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Picture of arnie
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Names that are aptly suited to their owners.

http://www.m-w.com/lighter/name/aptronym.htm
 
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Aptonyms, I'd say. Let's give tinman his due here. Big Grin

[This message was edited by shufitz on Mon May 5th, 2003 at 20:33.]
 
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For many years there was a butcher in Truro called Mutton and an antique dealer in Plymouth called Robin Bastard; the Bastards (pronounced bus'tard) are an old Westcountry family.

We used to buy fish from a Mr Veal, too, though.

Stephen
 
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quote:
Originally posted by shufitz:
I'd say. Let's give tinman his due here. Big Grin



it could be a struggle. Richard Lederer presented 'aptronym' to the masses:

Date: Wed Dec 12 00:02:04 EST 2001
aptronym (AP-troh-NIM) noun

A name that is especially suited to the profession of its owner.

[This message was edited by tsuwm on Thu May 29th, 2003 at 9:03.]
 
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This is the reverse of what the New Scientist called nominative determinism, which is where your name dictates your actions. My favourite example is a case where nominative determinism has obviously gone slightly wrong. There is a company that manufactures lifts (elevators), that goes by the name of Schindler.

Schindler's Lift... Geddit? Roll Eyes
 
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aptonym vs. aptronym:

[QUOTE]Originally posted by tsuwm:
it could be a struggle. Richard Lederer presented 'aptronym' to the masses[QUOTE]

Lederer strikes me as a legend in his own mind. Perhaps his name is an inaptonym? Wink

In terms of actual usage the two are quite close, at least in terms of google-hits. And most of the differential is because, as tsuwm has noted, the makers of on-line dictionaries steal egregiously from one another. If, to elimimate that factor, you exclude sites that have the word "dictionary", you get

55 google-hits for aptonym -dictionary
65 google-hits for aptronym -dictionary

The numbers are close, and neither is massive. In terms of settled usage, the jury is still out.
 
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And, this brings me back to a question I have posed on this board from time to time--when is a word considered a word? The purists would say only when it is published in OED. But, then, what about words like "epicaricacy" that for some reason or another were dropped from dictionaries? Or what about new words that are being developed, such as Web or Internet? Then, if we don't just take OED as our source, what do we take? Certainly, we have all questioned the online Grandiloquent Dictionary, but should we? Should we, for example, accept Lederer but not Mrs. Byrnes? I don't have the answers, but it is an interesting word discussion.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
And, this brings me back to a question I have posed on this board from time to time--when is a word considered a word? The purists would say only when it is published in OED.


In my opinion (which counts for very little, coming from the 'worthless word' corner), the salient question may be: when can a word be considered worthful? You may well be enamored of a word such as 'epicaricacy' or 'phat', but if the word is unknown in your personal mileau (and not in The Dictionary) it can only be classified (or floccinaucinihilipilificated, as it were) as worthless. You may strive to introduce such a word to your environment, and if you are successful you and your peers can use it and be understood; but it's prolly still not in the dictionary. Now you're gonna have to be published, or strangers will say, "that's not a word!" <g>

BTW, 'phat' is in AHD4 (and OED online)
 
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Tsuwm... wow, you are so down wit it dawg... using "phat" jus like dat... Wink
 
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quote:
In my opinion (which counts for very little, coming from the 'worthless word' corner)
Your opinion means a lot; after all, you are somewhat of a celebrity here. Wink

I suppose you make a good point. However, isn't it a shame that certain really good words get lost? I am only picking on "epicaricacy" because we have discussed it lately....but we had to go to German to get a like word because of the disappearance of our perfectly good English word, which appears to have been cited before "schadenfreude."
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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The Federation Aeronautique Internationale, the world governing body for aviation competitions both full-scale and model, lists one Mr Shatalov as model rocketry co-director at Baikonur cosmodrome. I suspect when one of the huge rockets blew up he did just that!
 
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I was recently in contact with a woman named Callie who's a graphic designer. Her company name is CallieGraphics.
 
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Reviving a thread - more nominative determinism

A Jamaican who is wanted in the USA on drugs charges is known as Christopher 'Dudus' Coke.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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Quite appropriate, isn't it? Wink
 
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Not strictly aptronyms, but where else should I put this?

http://www.cnn.com/2010/LIVING...ws/index.html?hpt=C1


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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It's perfect here, Geoff.

I am Denmark rejected "Anus" for a name. Wink
 
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I also recently read a news piece about a Chinese geneticist who should have been a cowboy movie star: Jian Wang. http://www.labome.org/expert/u...ian-wang-845267.html


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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I guess I am dense because I don't get it.
 
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No, you're not dense. It's a pun: Jian Wang, John Wayne.
 
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Jackie Chan used a similar name in the movie, "Shanghai Knights." http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0300471/combined


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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quote:
No, you're not dense. It's a pun: Jian Wang, John Wayne.
Well, thank you, Tinman, but I was a little dense. I should have gotten the pun! Roll Eyes
 
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Tony Dungy is a name in the news of late here in the USA. He's being smeared by homosexuals who don't like his fundamentalist views - but how do you make a guy named Dungy look any worse? Oy!!!
http://mojo.radio.cbssports.co...t-act-like-a-leader/
 
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At school I used to have a Religious Education teacher called Miss Sharpe and a Music teacher called Miss Christian. Always thought they ought to swap jobs!


------------------------
If your rhubarb is forwards, bend it backwards.
 
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Given Bill Clinton's proclivities, this is most apt! http://www.airnav.com/airport/KLIT
 
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Well, perhaps you can clue me in, but I always thought it was mysterious that my 2 high school librarians names were Mrs Shoe & Miss Stocking.. ??
 
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OK here are some aptronyms gleaned from a UK site:
Chemistry teacher Mr Love
Orthopedic surgeon Mr Limb
Policemen - Constable Lawless, & Robin Banks
Psychiatrist Mr Nutt
Religious Ed teacher Mrs Moral
Timber yard co. owned by the Planck family
Dentist, Dr Dentith & Dr Chew
Phys Ed teacher Miss Boddy
Geometry teacher Mr Angle
Solicitors Argue & Phibbs
& my mother swears that a local funeral parlor in her childhood was Dye & Berry
 
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I've seen this one : http://www.dignitymemorial.com...ary/en-us/index.page

And this legal firm is probably lying: http://www.ckflaw.com/contact-us/
 
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Caleb Weatherbee, the official forecaster for the Farmers’ Almanac.
 
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Those are pretty funny, Bethree. I wonder if they are real. A few of them sound too perfect, like Solicitors Argue and Phibbs or Dr. Dentith & Dr. Chew.
 
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Here's another real one that sounds too good to be true. My antique mum often recalled back in the day that her Girl Scout meetings were held in a hall whose wooden fold-out chairs had been donated by a local funeral parlor. Across the back of each chair was stenciled their moniker, "Dye and Berry".
 
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Several years ago, one local funeral home's director was named Coffin. I think his favorite chemical was barium.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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