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I love comparative linguistics and Jennifer's Language Page is a fascinating read Smile.
 
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I can think of some more interesting things one would need to say in every language...
 
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Originally posted by Seanahan:
I can think of some more interesting things one would need to say in every language...


So can I - and I learned some when I lived in Cyprus back in the early 60s Smile! We lived off-base and I played with the Greek kids next door who taught me some words which came in very useful when I was stationed out there with my husband 11 years later and was walking down the street with my baby son one day and was followed down the street by a group of youths who were commenting about me to each other. I turned round and reeled off all those words and they were so shocked that they just went away!
 
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Originally posted by Dianthus:
I love comparative linguistics and Jennifer's Language Page is a fascinating read Smile.


Thank you so much for this link! I am preparing for a 12-country tour of Europe next summer and my French, German, and (very bad) Spanish were not going to cut it in Norway, Finland, Estonia, Russia, or Greece. This will REALLY help me prepare.
 
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Have fun - I envy you Smile. I'm glad my link is useful as well as interesting Smile.
 
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wow, that's pretty comprehensive.

The problem with it is that it doesn't give the pronunciation. If it gave the pronunciation and incuded original orthography, that would be very awesome.
 
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Yes, in some languages pronunciation is fairly easy, such as Italian or Spanish. However, I am currently studying French and it's not so easy to even explain...that nasal part is getting me!
 
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I see it doesn't give Black Country English - so no help for those attending the Wordcraft Convention next month...


Richard English
 
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We'll have to ask Bob and/or Cat to produce a dictionary, or at least a phrasebook. Smile


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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By all means. I'll get right on it.

And the first lesson is "greetings"

Owamya - hello, how are you
 
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Black Country English

Interestingly enough, one of the great English poems, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, was written in the (North) West Midlands dialect of Middle English. JRR Tolkien edited this poem, and his edition is still used in universities today. At the time, there was no stigma attached to speaking or writing in one of the regional dialects of English. (This map shows some of the major dialect groupings in England.) The Black Country accent (aka Yam Yam) is called West Midlands dialect of English by linguists. Standard British English developed out of East Midlands dialects of Middle English.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Here is your first lesson. I want you all to practise at home.

Hello
Worrow (woh – roe)

Hello (to a friend)
Worrow, mate

Hello (to a family member)
Worrow, ahr kid (ahr is like a short version of the opening sound in "aaarrghh!")

Thank You
Ta (tar), Ta very much,
Note: for USians this is more like "tah", remember in the UK terminal Rs are rarely as prominently sounded as in the US

Goodbye
Tara (tuh-rah), Tara-a-bit (tuh-rah-uh-bit)

How are you?
Owamya? ( ow-am-yuh ow rhymes with now)

What's your name?
Wot yo called? (yo rhymes with go)

My name is…
Mi nerm's… (mih nermz)

I'm called…
Arm called…

Good morning
Mornin'

Good afternoon
Afternoon

Good evening
Evenin'

Good night
G'night

Please
Please (often plee-iz)

I don't understand
Ah doe know wot yo mean…

Do you speak English?
Joe spake Inglish?

I don't speak English
Ar doe spake Inglish?

Don't you speak English?
Doe yo spake Inglish or
Core yo spake Inglish

Yes
Are

No
Now


Very good
Bostin'

Isn't
Ay (pronounced like A when reciting the alphabet)

Aren't
Bay or Ay (more or less interchangeable but not always. I couldn't give you a rule but I know when one sounds wrong.)

We are
We am or Weem


A pint of your finest bitter, please
Pint uh bitta, plee-iz.

Do you have any bags of burnt pig skin that I may have as a snack?
Gorrenny scratchins? (goh ren-ee scratch-inns)

No, not those soft fluffy ones, I'd like the very hard crispy burnt pig skin
Now, are wanted th'ard uns. (Note want rhymes with pant not with pont)

Well what do you have to eat then, if you do not have any of them?
Well worav yo go' t'ate then. if yo air got them?


I'll add more as I think of them. If there is any particular phrase you feel you might need please ask and I'll translate for you.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: BobHale,
 
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If there is any particular phrase you feel you might need please ask and I'll translate for you.

A pint of beer and a packet of pork scratchings would seem to cover most needs already...


Richard English
 
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Big Grin Good one Bob!

I've got a Brummagem friend and she talks like that.

"You" is "yow" (which rhymes with "how"), all "a"s are pronounced as in "math", "oo" is pronounced as in "boo" (including in such words as "book" or "cook"). However, sometimes "a" is sometimes pronounced as "o" in such words as "called" (like "cold") in the areas surrounding Birmingham itself.

Practise the Brum accent by holding your nose and then trying to talk. That should position your voice in the right place Cool.

Apparently, the Brum accent landed at the bottom of a survey of the most- and least-liked accents in Britain. I don't mind it at all. The accent I hate most is what is known as "Estuary English" which an increasing number of people all over the country (especially young ones) are speaking Smile. It makes people sound "common", "thick" and uneducated (but I suppose that says more about me than them) Frown .

As for the term "Brummagem" for Birmingham, this is a very interesting article on the origin of the name.
 
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Oh dear Di. That's a mistake that means I have to cross you off my non-existant Christmas Card list. If you were a bloke and you were here I'd probably have to fight you. It's an honour thing, see. Muddling of the Birmingham and Black Country accents is a serious faux pas. Of course it's quite a compliment for the Brummies but a deadly insult in these parts.

I've seen bands playing in Bilston and Wolverhampton that have been booed off the stage for saying "Good evening Bimingham".
 
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And of course, if you happen to be in Dudloyee.. (which those coming to the Convention may have the pleasure of visiting)


Richard English
 
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quote:
Originally posted by BobHale:
Oh dear Di. That's a mistake that means I have to cross you off my non-existant Christmas Card list. If you were a bloke and you were here I'd probably have to fight you. It's an honour thing, see. Muddling of the Birmingham and Black Country accents is a serious faux pas. Of course it's quite a compliment for the Brummies but a deadly insult in these parts.

I've seen bands playing in Bilston and Wolverhampton that have been booed off the stage for saying "Good evening Bimingham".


{Shiver, shake, tremble} G-g-g-good j-j-job I'm n-n-not coming "oop north" in October!
 
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G-g-g-good j-j-job I'm n-n-not coming "oop north" in October!

That's mistake number 2. The West Midlands is only north to those of us who live south of the M25! Birmingham residents consider (with some justification) that they are south and west.

Birmingham is as far west as Bournemouth and as far south as Norwich.


Richard English
 
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Originally posted by Richard English:
quote:
G-g-g-good j-j-job I'm n-n-not coming "oop north" in October!

That's mistake number 2. The West Midlands is only north to those of us who live south of the M25! Birmingham residents consider (with some justification) that they are south and west.

Birmingham is as far west as Bournemouth and as far south as Norwich.


Well it's north to me Smile!

Actually, I've lived all over the UK - including Cosford near Wolverhampton where I did my WRAF trade training as a teleprinter operator and where I met my (now ex) husband - I'm teasing you Smile. The only part I've never been to is Ireland. I'd like to go there some day because my paternal grandfather was Irish and my maternal grandmother was Welsh (I like Wales, I've been to quite a few places there).
 
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Di,

No fighting... no Christmas cards. It's looking good for your side. Smile
 
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