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Picture of arnie
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An excellent site with discussion of all sorts of worthless words! The definition of 'worthless' is pretty elastic.

http://home.mn.rr.com/wwftd/Frame1.html
 
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that's just about the nicest thing anyone has ever said about my use of the word worthless

worthless word for the day
 
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Picture of jerry thomas
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quote:
The definition of 'worthless' is pretty elastic



arnie, does this mean worthless words are closely related to lingerie?? Red Face



Welcome to the community, tsuwm! It's fun!

~~~~ jerry
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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I receive the word of the day from this site, and I do like it. Big Grin

Welcome to Wordcraft, tsuwm! Wink Big Grin Smile Cool Razz

[This message was edited by Kalleh on Sat Mar 15th, 2003 at 9:38.]
 
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Picture of shufitz
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An excellent site. When the author titled it "Worthless" Word of the Day, he was speaking with litotes.

(P.S. Checking that word, I found that though the full scope of 'litotes' encompasses that author's modesty, the term is more typically given a narrower meaning.)
 
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Picture of shufitz
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Welcome to the mad-house, tsuwm. Roll Eyes Big Grin
 
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Picture of arnie
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From the site:
quote:
use of the term worthless should be considered to be either smart aleck or ironic, depending on your level of involvement and sophistication.
 
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Welcome tsuwm! I enjoyed looking over your site and hope you can bring some of your obscure words here for us to play with!
 
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Picture of arnie
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Originally posted by tsuwm:
quote:
that's just about the nicest thing anyone has ever said about my use of the word worthless
Hmm... That statement is certainly not an example of litotes; more a classic illustration of hyperbole!
 
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Picture of shufitz
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'Hyperbole' has to be related etymologically to the geometric curve the hyperbola. The sources say they come from the same root, but I can't see how that root relates to the curve. Can anyone help, or is this more mathematical than linguistic?
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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Well, let's see - since "bole" means a tree trunk, then "hyperbole" must be a REALLY big tree trunk. So what's that got to do with all this? Confused
 
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Picture of jerry thomas
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I've spent countless ages wondering about the real meaning of hyperbole !!
 
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Picture of Richard English
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As I understand it, the two words have totally different meanings because "hyperbola" comes (confusingly) from the Greek "huperbole", whereas "hyperbole" comes (again confusingly) from the Latin "hyperbola".

Hyperbole simply means an exaggerated statement that is not meant to be taken literally. (And there have been many eaxmples of such statements on this board!).

I tend to avoid the use of hyperbole as it will usually lead to trouble if the recipient of the hyperbolism doesn't realise that this is what it is!

For example, although I know a lot about beer, you will never see me claiming to be "The greatest living expert" or using Anheuser Busch's hyperbolical statement "King of Beers" (although maybe they expect people to believe it, in which case it is just a lie - not hyperbole)

Richard English
 
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I'm really surprised y'all (especially you UKns) didn't recognize irony when you saw it.
-ron (po-faced) obvious
 
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Picture of arnie
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Wink
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Having read this thread, I am now at a conference in DC where a nationally-recognized expert used hyperbole completely wrong, and I had to chuckle a bit as I listened. She was referring to confusion as she said, "There is a certain "hyperbole" that surrounds this conversation". When I got to my room, I checked this discussion and went to onelook, finding that "hyperbole" was the word-of-the-day on dictionary.com.

I am right that there is no way this word can mean "confusion", right? Or--should she be chuckling at me?
 
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Picture of arnie
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It certainly sounds like she used the wrong word, or misused it. I've been trying to think of similar-sounding words that would fit, but without success. Hyperbole can certainly cause confusion, if the listener takes what is said literally.

Hyperbole is a rhetorical device and means "exaggeration for effect". She might have meant that data was suspect because of exaggeration.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Arnie, I suppose she could have meant taking an exaggeration literally (after all, I am a literalist!)--good point! However, she was talking about the confusion between the roles of clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners. So, the "confusion" didn't really include any exaggeration. I think she just didn't understand the definition. If that's the case, it is strange because she is a major international healthcare leader.

Perhaps I should refer her to this board??? Big Grin
 
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We neglected to rate this "Worthless Word" site.
Excellent. And it's title gives is straightforward, so if you're looking for something so you won't go there and be disappointed.
 
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Picture of Richard English
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Excuse me?

Richard English
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Poor, wordnerd. Here you are with a bunch of apostrophe policemen! (Plus, I assume you neglected to do your due diligence with editing.)Razz

[This message was edited by Kalleh on Sat Apr 26th, 2003 at 17:24.]
 
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Frown Confused Abashed and ashamed. Confused Frown
I trust you know that the errors were in editing, not in understanding.
 
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I couldn't spot a place on your links page to report an address change, so I'm reduced to bubbling this up in a seemingly self-serving manner.

the new wwftd address is:
http://home.comcast.net/~wwftd/

(I know, I know.. I should get my own domain!)
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Oh, thanks, tsuwm! We do like your site, especially when we play our bluffing game Wink.
 
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Picture of arnie
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Thanks, tsuwm! I'd already changed my own bookmarks but didn't think to post here. It's always good to resurrect mentions of good sites every now and then so that the more recent comers to the board don't miss them!


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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We started this thread a long time ago when the board first began. We have posted a lot of links for linguaphiles...most (all?) of the best so this thread has died down a bit. Tsuwm has asked me why we don't update our links. That's a good question. If any of you know of links that have changed, please post the new address. I will begin to look, starting from the beginning, to make sure links are current. I'd love a little help from some of you on this.

Also...if there are links that we don't have, please post them!

Thanks.
 
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far be it from me to be self-deprecating (or self-depreciating, for that matter), so I'll just say that the wwftd site recently surpassed one million (1,000,000) page visits.

just thought you'd like to know.. : )
 
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Picture of arnie
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That's an important milestone, tsuwm! Congratulations!


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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