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WC Gathering 2008

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http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/281603894/m/1531063294

February 23, 2008, 04:17
arnie
WC Gathering 2008
Good idea, Bob. I've done just that.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
February 23, 2008, 19:18
Kalleh
Thanks, arnie. I should have thought of that. Roll Eyes The fact is, I don't think like an administrator here.

Di has informed us that she is unable to come. Too bad. We'd love some more from England...or some other countries. Hey...how about you Canadians? There are places in the U.S. that are farther away than you are. Think about it!
February 24, 2008, 06:00
Richard English
And I shall be travelling from British Columbia all the way to Columbus without setting foot in an aeroplane! If I can do it...


Richard English
April 04, 2008, 09:44
Richard English
Just a reminder...

Although the Wordcraft gathering for 2008 seems a long way away it is actually only just over a month away as we will be meeting on 23 May. A month before that, on 23 April, I shall be jetting to Canada and will then travel by surface to Columbus via Chicago.

Which means that if anyone wants to chat to me about the gathering (or arrange to meet me for a pint in Vancouver or its environs) they need to do it before I leave, as the posting possibilities once I'm in the depths of the Canadian Rockies might be tricky.

Anyone who's not yet committed him or herself needs to make plans PDQ, since hotel beds are likely to be at a premium that weekend!

I am really looking forward to meeting everyone again and, of course, making the acquaintance of those for whom this will be their first Wordcraft gathering.


Richard English
April 04, 2008, 19:16
Caterwauller
Yay! It's almost here! I am very much looking forward to everyone visiting our fair city!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
April 06, 2008, 01:38
Richard English
It was a year ago almost to the day (09 April) that we went to Chicago for Wordcraft 2008!

Then it was really warm and sunny here and, by the 10th snowing hard in Chicago. Now it's snowing hard here and we are getting quite a covering - which is very unusual for Partridge Green as it's in the rain shadow of the South Downs.

But it certainly brings back memories of negotiating the snowdrifts on our way to one of the several Real Ale bars we visited during that memorable stay.


Richard English
April 06, 2008, 01:45
arnie
Yes, it's snowing in London, too. I think it's the first snow this winter to settle. That's in April!


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
April 06, 2008, 01:48
BobHale
Looked at another way it's a year ago since Kalleh and shu were kind enough to take me off to the House on the Rock. Richard, I believe arrived a year ago to the tomorrow - it was Monday wasn't it? (Depends, I suppose on how you define "to the day".)

The House on the Rock was, for me, the best day of a visit that only had good days. I;m sure that you'll all have just as good a time this year. I wish I could be there.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.

My current blog.
Photographs to accompany Anyone Can DO It available from www.lulu.com
My photoblog The World Through A lens
April 06, 2008, 01:49
BobHale
Oh yes. I nearly forgot. We're covered in snow in the West Midlands too although it's melting quickly now that the sun has come out.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.

My current blog.
Photographs to accompany Anyone Can DO It available from www.lulu.com
My photoblog The World Through A lens
April 06, 2008, 12:47
Caterwauller
We had over 20 inches of snow just a few weeks ago, but today it is sunny and lovely. Simon just took a little bike trip to the toy store - in shorts!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
April 06, 2008, 14:19
Richard English
quote:
We had over 20 inches of snow just a few weeks ago

Yes. We were treated to some footage from Columbus when the primaries were taking place in Ohio. It looked very gloomy then.


Richard English
April 06, 2008, 14:43
jerry thomas
Oh to be in Ohio, now that April's there !!
April 06, 2008, 16:33
Kalleh
We have similar weather in Chicago, and this weekend has been fabulous, with temperatures in the 60s and lots of sun. Remember last year at this time with the Wordcraft Gathering? We had 6 inches of snow and it was freezing. You never know about the midwest.
April 07, 2008, 02:05
Richard English
quote:
Oh to be in Ohio, now that April's there !!

It's a bit like that here in England right now. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/this-britain/sprin...-showers-805389.html


Richard English
May 04, 2008, 17:26
Caterwauller
For those of you coming to the Gathering, I thought I'd share the invite that I've sent out for the party we'll be having Saturday night that weekend:

hoot·en·an·ny [ ht'n ànnee ] (plural hoot·en·an·nies)

noun Definition:

1. performance by folk singers: an informal or impromptu performance by
folk singers, in which the audience often participates

2. unnamed object: an object or gadget for which the name is not known

[Early 20th century. Origin ?]


This is a fairly open invitation to any and all who like a real Hootenanny! Feel free to share this invitation with anyone you know who is fun and would enjoy a party like this!

We'll be at my house, (address given), starting at or around 6:00 pm on Saturday, May 24th.

Bring: musical instruments, snacks/side dish to share, your own alcoholic beverages, lawn chairs, friends and family (but only if you
feel like it!) Out-of-town guests do not need to bring any food or alcohol - we are just glad you'll be here!

We'll provide: pop, hot dogs, fire in the fire pit, more musical instruments, visitors from out of town (including word-lovers from the discussion board, Wordcraft - http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/ )


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
May 04, 2008, 19:59
wordmatic
On top of old Smokey,
All covered with snow....

Lemme warm up them pipes--sounds like fun, and I can hardly wait to see whether we'll be asked to identify unidentified grounded objects or sing!

Wordmatic
May 04, 2008, 20:14
Kalleh
Sounds fun, though it would be hard to fit our piano in the car, so we'll probably come without instruments. We'll look around the house, though!

BTW, I did hear from TrossL, and unfortunately she won't be able to make it. We'll all have fun, though!
May 09, 2008, 11:09
Richard English
Well, at least I'm now in the right continent - although a few thousand miles too far west! On 18 May I catch the train for Chicago - just a shame I have to drive around 400 miles to get the the railway station;(


Richard English
May 19, 2008, 20:12
Kalleh
Richard and Margaret are coming to Chicago tomorrow, and we will leave on Thursday for Columbus to meet up with Wordmatic and CW. As is usual for Wordcraft Chicago Gatherings, it's cold and rainy. Such is Chicago's unpredicatable springs (and falls and winters and summers).
May 20, 2008, 20:18
wordmatic
Looks like we'll have cold and rainy in Columbus until Saturday also. It's the same weather here. I heard on the news that it was a rare Arctic cyclone! The cold, wind and rain comes around like the spoke of a bike and each time the spoke hits, it dumps on you!

WM
May 20, 2008, 20:40
jerry thomas
For up-to-date news of the weather in Columbus, Ohio please click here.
May 21, 2008, 15:39
Caterwauller
The 4 day forecast is looking pretty nice, actually. Click here for local news' take on it. I think Saturday is going to be perfect for the Zoo and an outdoor party!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
May 22, 2008, 18:18
Caterwauller
Wordmatic arrived this afternoon at the airport, where I picked her up around 2:30. We got a bite to eat (actually, I ate, she just had coffee), and then hung out at my house for a bit while we waited for the Chicago travelers. We met them at a Brewhouse around 7ish, and had a fun dinner with great beer (yes, of course, I know all about cask-conditioning!).

It's great to see folks!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
May 22, 2008, 19:06
wordmatic
CW drove up to the passenger pickup area waving a sign from her car window that said "WORDS!" How could I miss? And how lovely to meet all of these Wordcrafters in person after two years of online chats! Tomorrow, a tour of Ohio State University, courtesy of Mike, CW's husband, and then of the James Thurber house, with Simon as our docent.

If I can figure it out, I will post some photos on the photo forum.

Wordmatic
May 22, 2008, 20:31
Kalleh
Even though our GPS made a few mistakes (while the hotel was right in front of my face, I followed the wrong directions of the GPS Roll Eyes), we made it safely, and we're ready to roll! We already had a nice discussion of the difference between nerd, dweeb, geek, dufus, twerp, and I believe there were a few others. We also agreed that gloating is more like bragging than it is like epicaricacy. And, yes, Richard, we know about that noun/verb difference.

I am sure the waitress thought we were a bunch of geeks!
May 24, 2008, 14:38
wordmatic
And the blast continues. Some People are out drinking beer, while others are resting up for the Saturday night "do" at CW's. I've posted a few photos over on the photo forum and will post still more when I get home tomorrow night.

Wordmatic
May 26, 2008, 15:06
Richard English
Hee! Hee! Hee! This is really Kalleh, as Richard was using my computer and left himself logged in. The things I could say! Budweiser is my favorite beer! The Americans have invented everything; we poor Brits just tag along after them. How I love the "Unmade Bed." And limericks that have long authors' notes and go on and on, without really defining the word, are my favorites. Those damn old apostrophe's. Who needs them anyway?

But I won't tease Richard. I am just too nice of a person. Wink


Richard English
May 26, 2008, 16:50
Caterwauller
Hahaha! I gather from this that you're all safely back in Chicago. Glad to know it! Hope your travel was fine today. We hardly got any rain, although the forecasts were really gloom and doom-ish.


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
May 27, 2008, 06:19
arnie
quote:
I am just too nice of a person

Although we all know that, Kalleh, I am curious about your use of the above phrase. In the UK we would say I am just too nice a person (without the use of of). Is that a standard construction in the US?


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
May 27, 2008, 07:19
jerry thomas
My dialect is General American, and I do it as you do, Arnie. (With due respect to Kalleh's midwest way of speaking.)

But ... on the other hand ... I'm too much of a perfectionist to do it otherwise.
May 27, 2008, 08:45
arnie
quote:
Originally posted by jerry thomas:
... I'm too much of a perfectionist to do it otherwise.
Hmm ... I might use either construction there: I'm too much of a perfectionist to do it otherwise or I'm too much a perfectionist to do it otherwise.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
May 27, 2008, 15:53
Richard English
quote:
Hee! Hee! Hee! This is really Kalleh, as Richard was using my computer and left himself logged in.

Nobody would have been fooled! I'd not have used the Webster spelling of favourite and, even if I had changed my mind about Emins's work (unlikely, even if she offered to share her unmade bed with me) I would never have apostrophised the plural of apostrophe!

And as for that eccentric "...too nice of a person...", the mind does more than simply boggle!


Richard English
May 27, 2008, 16:24
wordmatic
And truth be told, Richard's too nice [of a] person to criticize...right, Richard?

In informal speech my Midwestern "of a" might pop out, but if I write it, it's "I'm too nice a person."

It's nice we're all so nice, I think!

WM
May 27, 2008, 21:21
Kalleh
quote:
I'm too much of a perfectionist to do it otherwise.
quote:
In informal speech my Midwestern "of a" might pop out, but if I write it, it's "I'm too nice a person."
Isn't that presumptuous? The use of "of" is wrong in that context? We shall see. I don't buy it.
quote:
Nobody would have been fooled!
Had I wanted to "fool" people, I'd have written that comment differently. It was quite clear that I was writing the comment, I believe.

At any rate, regardless (perhaps I should further irritate everyone and say "irregardless") of the of, we had a fine time. Richard and Margaret are still here with us, and we've had lots of fun and lots of beer. We spent today at the Garfield Park Conservatory, along with a few side trips to pubs and book stores. Shu and Richard have had a few "spirited" conversations about the BBC or the difference between "taps" and "drafts." The temperature yesterday was 83, and it was quite humid. I had contemplated putting on the air conditioning. Today it is in the 40s. I have the heat on. Such is Chicago. Roll Eyes
May 28, 2008, 04:09
arnie
Kalleh,

I am certainly not saying that your use of of was 'wrong'. I was simply curious as to whether its use in that way was common in the US as I'd never come across that construction before.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
May 28, 2008, 05:23
BobHale
I have heard it before, but only from American TV and occasionally from Americans I've met. It isn't simply uncommon over here, it's non-existent. We would never use "of" in that construction in England.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.

My current blog.
Photographs to accompany Anyone Can DO It available from www.lulu.com
My photoblog The World Through A lens
May 28, 2008, 07:53
neveu
I think it's a Midwestern thing. Maybe it's from German.
May 28, 2008, 10:20
Kalleh
quote:
I am certainly not saying that your use of of was 'wrong'.
No, I know you didn't, arnie. You were merely asking if it were an Americanism. However, some of the Americans seemed to indicate that it was a wrong usage, and I just wondered. I have asked Nathan Bierma because I just don't know how to look it up. Of course it's all over Google, but then Google is hardly a reliable source. I couldn't find it in my CMS, but perhaps I didn't look in the right place.

If I am told it's wrong, then I won't use it anymore. Perhaps as WM says, it's merely informal and not to be written. I'll report back!
May 28, 2008, 10:55
wordmatic
MOI???? Presumptuous?

I should be proofreading the course catalog but I'm too lazy of a person to do it in a timely fashion! Big Grin

Actually, I'm not so sure that it is "wrong" so much as it is redundant, and when you work in writing and editing you are taught to avoid redundancies always.

Why say "I'm too nice of a person to do that," when "I'm too nice a person to do that," or even "I'm too nice to do that" would suffice?

But it might be wrong; it feels like slang to me, but I can't tell you why. If it's incorrect grammatically it might have something to do with the fact that it should be an adverbial phrase instead of a prepositional phrase--and I know the moment I say that that I will be skewered from all sides by the real linguists and grammarians. "I am too nice as a person to do that" sounds equally awkward to me, but somehow more correct. This expresses that I am personally too nice, whereas the "of a" construction expresses something that makes no sense, that I am too nice and of one person. The of has nothing to be part of, or something.

Back to my proofreading. It's much less confusing and far more tedious.

Wordmatic
May 28, 2008, 11:30
zmježd
"wrong"

I'd say it was a grammatical feature of a regional dialect, probably Midwestern as neveu suggested. For me, slang (aka jargon, cant, argot) is different from regional dialects, in that the former usually is more concerned with the speech patterns (mainly lexical items, or word choice) of different social groups within a dialect region. So, nerds in the South may share much the same slang vocabulary with nerds in other dialect regions, and still display dialect differences such as pronunciation: e.g., the word char meaning a type (in the programming language sense) is usually pronounced /'tʃar/ here on the West Coast of the USA, but /'kær/ back East. (Although, I don't really thinking of char as a slang term.) Probably a better example would be the pronunciation of the vowel in bit in the jargon term bit bucket (link) in different regions or beta in US and UK varieties of English.

Also, I realize I'm a bit of a stickler, but for me something is grammatical in a lectal variety of a language if some significant portion of the speakers use it. So, for me, when speaking or writing formally, ain't is ungrammatical, but not in certain informal settings. All varieties of language are rule-based. I've suggested a Gedankenexperiment for those who doubt this. Pick a non-standard variety of English and try speaking it with a native speaker. Many people, even good mimics, usually think that they can do this, but almost always some tiny variation from what is normal or grammatical in the variety under consdieration clues the native speaker in.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
May 29, 2008, 20:57
Kalleh
quote:
If it's incorrect grammatically it might have something to do with the fact that it should be an adverbial phrase instead of a prepositional phrase
I suppose.

z, I tried to look up "lectal" and couldn't find it anywhere. What does it mean?
May 30, 2008, 00:34
BobHale
quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:


z, I tried to look up "lectal" and couldn't find it anywhere. What does it mean?


It's a bit of linguistics jargon. It means relating to the different types of language variety (e.g. dialect, idiolect, acrolect).

It's the adjective from lect .


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.

My current blog.
Photographs to accompany Anyone Can DO It available from www.lulu.com
My photoblog The World Through A lens
May 31, 2008, 20:02
Kalleh
Interestingly, I just looked up in Google "too nice of a person" and "too nice a person."

I got 3,450 for the latter and 6,220 for the former. I realize that's hardly scientifically reliable, but it does give you and idea of how language is used.
June 01, 2008, 00:41
Richard English
I suspect this construction might be more common in US English; I have never heard it used in the UK. Would you, incidentally, use that same construction in other phrases? For example:

"It's too small of a car". "It's too expensive of a meal". "It's too long of a drive".

I would certainly never do so as I consider the "of" to be redundant in these examples. I would, though, use it in phrases such as:

"It's too much of an effort". "There are too many of them".


Richard English
June 01, 2008, 02:50
arnie
quote:
I would, though, use it in phrases such as:"It's too much of an effort". "There are too many of them".
There's a slight differemce in my eyes between "It's too much of an effort" and "It's too much effort". The former means this particular task is not worth doing and the latter is more general, implying that things in general aren't worth bothering about.

"It's too much an effort" is also possible, although for some reason it sounds rather old-fashioned.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
June 01, 2008, 05:56
Richard English
quote:
There's a slight differemce in my eyes between "It's too much of an effort" and "It's too much effort".

Oh I agree. But both are grammatically correct.


Richard English
June 01, 2008, 19:34
Kalleh
Well, you can all rest easy. I've decided not to use the phrase again.
June 02, 2008, 03:40
Caterwauller
I, however, will still use it. If I feel like it, I might use extra "of"s in all kinds of ways . . . and you can't stop me!!!!

I'm just that kind of a woman!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
June 02, 2008, 21:01
Kalleh
Well, I might not use it, but I've surely complained about this discussion on my blog. I am beginning to see the beauty of blogs. They allow you lots of freedom. Cool

And, bottom line, I haven't been convinced that there is anything wrong with the phrase, whether said informally or written formally.
June 04, 2008, 11:26
bethree5
Sounds like Wordcraft Gathering '08 was a roaring success and left you all energized!

I loved "your" post, Richard, & was almost convinced that the warm, fuzzy occasion caused you to reconsider all sorts of principles heretofore cast in concrete! (not!) What was your favorite beer of the weekend?

Kalleh I agree, you're much too nice "of" a person to do such a thing! That is definitely midwestern slang & especially Chicagoan if I'm not mistaken. I think of it as a "Scandinavian" thing or a "Germanic" thing. Help me out, true linguists? (is it ablative or what?) Can't help thinking a Germanic tongue would insert their version of "of", or the equivalent case?

Around good old NYC we have lots of the opposite-- phrases where prepositions are strangely missing (as in "shut the light." I think of them as "Italianisms", as they were practiced by my in-laws, whose native verbs were not post-scripted with up down in out off on & what have you.

Back to the end-of-the-school-year rush...