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Here is the poll. Please forgive if I've messed something up because there were so many! Whew!

(Got them all posted and then accidentally deleted them all and had to start all over. Ugh!)

Done. Rushing for plane!!! Forgive mistakes.

Question:
1. It's becoming increasingly clear
That the beautiful gal from Shopiere
Is not merely a looker.
She's a high-status hooker:
Her hobby became her career.

2. There once was a girl from Shopiere;
She was cute, but a little bit queer.
(By that I mean "odd;"
My meaning's not mod.)
She slept with her champion steer.

3. I wandered the streets of Shopiere
Feeling dread that deepened to fear
I wasn’t to wed
My pretty redhead
Her gun totin’ dad made that clear

4. The road to the White House is clear
As it runs through towns like Shopiere
For Clinton and Trump
Each town means a stump
With hopes of an answering cheer!

5. While walking the streets of Shopiere
A stranger said, “I’m Richard Gere.
I think you’re pretty”
And squeezed a titty
I gave him a blow to the ear!

6. A hippie that lived in Shopier
Said, “Our weed is better than beer!
Forget your troubles
Stop your struggles
Go with the flow, is that clear?”

7. I hear there's a hooker in Shopiere
Whose pimp is a chimp from a zoo near
The zoo keepers love her
For they did discover
She does it with dingos with no fear.

8. They're the "friends" any bride would so fear,
At her Hens night held in Shopiere -
What they did really sucks
Even worse than the Bucks,
They tied her up wearing no gear.

9. A daredevil out in Shopiere
Will never, not ever show fear
He will guzzle his fill
Of a foul-smelling swill
Then outa his ass he'll blow beer

10. Kalleh would bike up to Shopierre
And strip to the skin showing no fear
Though the water was icy
And her safety was dicey
She'd dive in head first from the low pier

11. If you happen to visit Shopiere
And you crave for a really good beer
Just stop at the Tap
You won't find no crap
You'll find only good ale and good cheer

12. I remember my childhood so dear
I was raised on a farm near Shopiere
I'd play in the creek
And swim every week
Any time that I could through the year

13. Turtle Creek in the place called Shopiere
Is the place where the kids never fear
They would play in the pond
And quite often they spawned
That is if the grown-ups weren't near

14. He was boinking his girl in Shopiere
In the glen, by the creek, by the weir
And when he was done
She said, "That was fun
But now do the rear, my dear."

15. There was once a young man in Shopiere
And he couldn't play music by ear
Though he tried and he tried
And he said to his bride
If they only were longer, my dear

16. A young boy who lived in Shopiere
Didn't know the meaning of fear
He played in the creek
And called others weak
If they wouldn't slide down the weir


17. In the village that's known as Shopiere
I looked for a good brand of beer
I looked all around
But all that I found
Was a glass full of watered Rainier

18. A young girl who once lived in Shopiere
Was known to wear clothing quite sheer
She'd show off her stuff
Then strip to the buff
And flash all the guys who were near

19. He was in a bar in Shopiere
And a drunk was bending his ear
He said to the dips
"Now read my lips
And just get the hell outa here!"

dips = dipsomaniac = alcoholic

20. There's a creek in the place called Shopiere
The young kids with no sense and no fear
Would slide down the dam
Then up they would scram
And go back to the weir in good cheer

21. A wide spot in the road is Shopiere
There is nothing that is very near
Except for a creek
Where all but the meek
Would swim in the nude every year

22. He was out in the hills of Shopiere
"I've run out of petrol, my dear"
"Well, go get some gas
But don't touch my ass"
She said, with a menacing sneer

23. A young gal who lived in Shopiere
And a man who came from Zaire
Were frolicking one day
In the usual way
When he slipped and entered her rear

24. There was once a young man from Shopiere
Who was known to seldom drink beer
But one night he got drunk
He was drunk as a skunk
And he wound up in bed with a queer

25. Good grammar, it soon became clear,
To a shop-girl who worked in Shopiere,
From the misspoken word
And poor language she heard,
Would be a life's passion, so dear.

26. When she'd shop in a shop in Shopiere
She learned that you cannot show fear.
You just snatch what you find,
Paying others no mind -
Grabbing bargains my wife has no peer!

27. There was an old man of Shopiere
Who said to his wife, “Well my dear,
Do you think it’s too risky
At our age to get frisky,
As long as it’s just once a year?”

28. There once was man from Shopiere
Who asked his girlfriend to blow here
She felt like a ho
Though he said, “Hell, no!
With a mouth like that, go pro, dear!”

29. In summer she swam in Shopiere
The water was always so clear
Oh how she would slide
Till skin was rawhide
And her mother proclaimed, “Oh, dear!”

30. She lazed by the creek in Shopiere
With no care, no worry, no fear
Till this huge spider
Dropped down beside her
Bilbo came, but dwarf-less, how queer!

31. Peeping Tom, a man in Shopiere
Had stolen a lacy brassiere
Though he tried not to grin
As the cops took him in
The judge saw his sinister leer

32. The skill of the whore from Shopiere
At chiasmus is known far and near.
"It's a true business do-
-ing such pleasure to you!"
Is her motto. (Pre-pay the cashier.)

33. I leer at the girl from Shopiere
In her sweater of finest cashmere,
For its fit is so tight
That it's evident quite
She is going about sans brassiere.

Choices:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.

 

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Kalleh,
 
Posts: 23317 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Someone already alerted me to an error so please don't vote until I give you a go ahead. If you vote, and then I edit, all votes will be deleted. You probably need time to chew on these anyway. I think the number had to do with the story and also the easiness of the rhyme.
 
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No worries will suspend voting until you give the all clear, but this is insane. 33 limericks!! Surely we have never had that many before?


Regards Greg
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Greg S:
No worries will suspend voting until you give the all clear, but this is insane. 33 limericks!! Surely we have never had that many before?


I think when I led the one about Saint Joe, there were 22 entries. This tops it!


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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FYI Kalleh

Spotted an error or two in others' limericks, you might like to fix as well, in case the authors didn't report them:

Limerick 1: 2nd last word should be "her"
Limerick 14: Not sure about this one but maybe "boinking" should be "bonking"


Regards Greg
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Greg S:
FYI Kalleh

Spotted an error or two in others' limericks, you might like to fix as well, in case the authors didn't report them:

Limerick 1: 2nd last word should be "her"
Limerick 14: Not sure about this one but maybe "boinking" should be "bonking"


I didn't write #14, but I think boinking is a slang word in this country (USA) for sex.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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Okay - I fixed the mistakes people told me about, and Greg was right about my typo with "here." However, on #14, it the author wrote "boinking" so I am going to stick with it.

Some didn't have any punctuation marks. I started to punctuate and then thought better of it because in some cases I may have changed the intent. Had we just had our usual 8, I'd ask the authors if they wanted punctuations, but with 33 I was a bit overwhelmed. My suggestion to all of you - don't avoid a selection simply because there is no punctuation.

You have the green light - go ahead and vote!

With all of these, I still know which is my favorite, but I'll wait in case there's a tie.
 
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For amusement only. I'm merely taking a limerick I knew before, and changing the place-name.

A considerate king is Shopiere's.
He proclaimed to his harem, "My dears,
Though you may think it odd of me,
I'm tired of sodomy.
Tonight's for you ladies!" (Loud cheers)

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I see No. 9 has polled the first vote. It is one of several I am considering voting for, but I can tell you this for sure, I wouldn't be drinking any of that "shit".


Regards Greg
 
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The daredevil out in Shopiere
Who outa his ass could blow beer,
Was asked to show proof,
And he blew off the roof,
When he drank the "shit" showing no fear.


Regards Greg
 
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Although it wasn't funny to me, I voted for # 17, just because it brought back memories of the marvelous Rainier beer commercials of long ago, when it was still an independent brewery. Now it's just a part of "Big Beer."
https://www.youtube.com/user/rainierbeertv

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I took 27 for its charm, with 32 and 33 close behind. I guess I prefer understatement to being hit over the head...
 
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Oh my gosh, I was so surprised that the poll happened already-- & that there were so many entries!

Those who know me know that I think these things out the way others count sheep.

Here are the two too-late limericks I've been rehearsing in those late hours:


1.
There once was a man from Shopiere
With vices and habits so queer
He'd keep the shades drawn
From dusk until dawn
So as to elicit no jeer.

2.
The social life up in Shopiere
Is said to be rather low-gear:
There's swingers and pot-clubs
And threesomes in hot-tubs
But Sundays you can't buy no beer.
 
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Beth these are so good! Wish you had entered them!


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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Most people have had a chance to look at these and start thinking about which one they like best. So, I thought it wouldn't hurt to talk about my choosing process. I copied and pasted the list into a word document. I went through first and got rid of mine. Then I went through and highlighted in grey the ones I was pretty sure that I didn't think I liked enough to choose. I read them again before deleting the ones highlighted. This left me with 8 limericks.

Like haberdasher, I enjoyed 27 for its charm. Maybe, I should have voted for it just on that alone, but there was only a rhyme to the second syllable of Shopiere and not the the 1st. There was one limerick that rhymed well and flowed well, too. I voted for #9. I have to admit though, had Bethtree5 gotten her last limerick in I would have chosen it.

"The social life up in Shopiere
Is said to be rather low-gear:
There's swingers and pot-clubs
And threesomes in hot-tubs
But Sundays you can't buy no beer."

She rhymes the last two syllables in every line! It flows well. It has a twist at the end. This is really interesting to me, also, because she doesn't use the format of 5 syllables for the 3rd and 4th line. I have been trying to do so and am beginning to see that it doesn't always flow well in all cases. Perhaps, someone can understand and explain why.

One of the things I feel after reading all of these and writing mine is that I can enjoy all of them. They don't have to all be outstanding to be interesting. Part of the enjoyment is seeing where the mind can go with what is available.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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Point of correction from the author about boink:

OED Online
quote:
boink, v.
Etymology: < boink n. Compare bonk v.
Chiefly N. Amer.

2. trans. slang. To have sexual intercourse with. Also intr. Cf. bonk v. 2.
1985 Moonlighting (transcript of TV programme) 19 Mar. in www.davidandmaddie.com (O.E.D. Archive) You're mad because he boinked a couple of hausfraus?

1986 Re: Orphaned Response in net.singles (Usenet newsgroup) 5 Feb. When you and your honey boink away, you're doing what the doggies do.


1991 C. Hiaasen Native Tongue (1992) xiv. 163 It's no trick. He's trying to boink her.

2003 A. Sayle Overtaken 66 I'm not after a shag off you honest. Though I may boink your little friend.

boink, n. and int.
Etymology: Imitative. Compare bonk n. and boing int. Compare later boink v.
Chiefly N. Amer.

2. slang. An act of sexual intercourse. Cf. bonk n. 3.Recorded earliest in attributive use.

1989 St. Petersburg (Florida) Times 25 June 6 d/4 The mutant sexual excesses necessary to satisfy American boink-lust.

1990 J. L. Reynolds And leave her lay Dying 88 What are you saying, I took him in the back for a quick boink one night?

1994 Toronto Sun (Nexis) 1 July 77 At least if I've had a good boink I feel like something decent happened to me.

2002 Advocate 9 July 49/3 He offers the kid 300 bucks for a quick boink.
 
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The voting suggests another cause of divorce - a stale mate. I guess Kalleh's got to break the six-way tie.
 
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Let me think. Let me think! I've got it narrowed down to 7.
 
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Six piddly votes - with 33 limericks? I did my part and posted all these while rushing for a plane in the airport. It is now your turn, guys! I'll get Shu to weigh in at least.

[Little crabby here. Time for bed. Wink]
 
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33 from how many contributers? Even if you submit ten you still only get one vote.
 
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6 votes, from how many members? Each member gets a vote.
 
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I still haven't voted yet. I am very time poor, and it is much harder to decide when there are 33 to choose from and so many pretty good ones. I may well break the tie, as there are 2 that already have a vote that are in my short-list. Then again I am just as likely to make it a 7-way tie.


Regards Greg
 
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This is like the Republican presidential primary. Too many candidates, not enough voters to establish a winner. Suffest limits on number of submissions t tighte the outcome.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Oh damn it. Why beat around the bush (more Aussie slang)? Since it was good enough to prompt me to write a retort limerick about the daredevil being to prove it was beer coming out of his arse (note: I even did the right thing by the author and retained the US word "ass" in my retort), then it is good enough for my vote, so I am breaking the tie by voting for #9.


Regards Greg
 
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quote:
She rhymes the last two syllables in every line!

Well actually she doesn't! Although lots of people did that including me, the only real 2-syllable rhyme in this entire 33 limerick game is "no peer".

If you had decided that the last syllable is the emphasised (Aussie & English spelling) one then "by fear" is just as good a rhyme as "no fear".

But if you had decided the the 2nd last syllable was the emphasised one, then the only valid rhymes are ones where the last syllable is a homophone of the word you are rhyming with such as "no peer" or "low pier"

For example in the town Brighton (we had a game on this which was the first time I entered and I won), where the last syllable is a "schwa" the only valid rhymes must end in the -ighton sound.

As I said I did the same thing in one of my 2 entries, and it is probably still worth a "bonus" point, so I am not being critical of B35's excellent limerick, I am just trying to help you understand better what the technical requirements of a limerick are, so you can write better ones, that's all.


Regards Greg
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Greg S:
quote:
She rhymes the last two syllables in every line!

Well actually she doesn't! Although lots of people did that including me, the only real 2-syllable rhyme in this entire 33 limerick game is "no peer".

If you had decided that the last syllable is the emphasised (Aussie & English spelling) one then "by fear" is just as good a rhyme as "no fear".

But if you had decided the the 2nd last syllable was the emphasised one, then the only valid rhymes are ones where the last syllable is a homophone of the word you are rhyming with such as "no peer" or "low pier"

For example in the town Brighton (we had a game on this which was the first time I entered and I won), where the last syllable is a "schwa" the only valid rhymes must end in the -ighton sound.

As I said I did the same thing in one of my 2 entries, and it is probably still worth a "bonus" point, so I am not being critical of B35's excellent limerick, I am just trying to help you understand better what the technical requirements of a limerick are, so you can write better ones, that's all.


Maybe, I will have to read this a few times, but I really don't understand. The example you gave:

26. When she'd shop in a shop in Shopiere
She learned that you cannot show fear.
You just snatch what you find,
Paying others no mind -
Grabbing bargains my wife has no peer!

In my mind, "you find" and "no mind", only rhyme in the last word. What I meant (and I realize that I was using the word syllable when it wasn't correct), is that Bethree5 rhymed using two words "pot-clubs" and "hot-tubs". Maybe saying that Bethree5 rhymed using 2 beats at the end of each line would have been more accurate. I also thought it was really original. Thanks Greg, for your help and I will reread these and try to understand better what you are trying to teach me _/i\_

There were quite a few really good ones. I apologize for writing so many bad ones! I decided that since the only thing at this point going for me is being able to write many, I would try to beat tinman on the amount of entries in the last minute. The idea of limiting entries probably is a good thing. How many do your think it should be, 2 or 3? Perhaps, we could also post the ones we definitely don't think are up to snuff just for fun, but not in the poll. For myself, even the ones that I write that have a terrible flow or just aren't right, I can enjoy for the imagination. Do any of you also feel this way about any of your limericks?


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Greg S:
Oh damn it. Why beat around the bush (more Aussie slang)?

Beat around the bush comes from hunting. In medieval times men would beat the bush, or around the bush, to flush birds and other game out for the hunters. The phrase first appeared in print around 1440 in the poem Generydes – A Romance in Seven-line Stanzas by an anonymous author in the English Midlands:

quote:
Butt as it hath be sayde full long agoo,
Some bete the bussh and some the byrdes take


and in 1572 by the English poet, George Gascoigne:
quote:
He bet about the bush, whyles other caught the birds.

The OED Online says:

  b. Phr. to beat the bush: (lit.) in bat-fowling, to rouse the birds that they may fly into the net held by some one else; (fig.) to expend labour of which the fruit is not gained by oneself.
to beat (formerly also go, wend, seek) about the bush: to go indirectly and tentatively towards an object, to avoid coming to the point.

Note that bete the bussh in the earlier poem became bet about the bush in the latter poem. It's now most commonly beat around the bush, at least in the USA.

The Phrase Finder
Know Your Phrase
Idiomation
Wikipedia: Bat-fowling
Reader's digest: Batfowlling

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Let me take a crack at it, defining "rhyme" that is, as I've done it before.

A proper rhyme rhymes the last STRESSED syllable and has all the subsequent syllables identical (NOT simply rhymed.)

So with "Shopiere" (pronounced as "show peer") there are two possibilities.
The stressed syllable could be SHOW (SHOW peer) or it could be PEER (show PEER).

If it's the latter then the rhyme is easy, the last syllable of rhyming lines must rhyme with PEER - what comes before doesn't matter

so "go near" would rhyme, but so would "come near", "be near" or play near". Only the PEER needs to be rhymed.

However, if the stressed syllable is SHOW it's a whole new ballgame because the penultimate syllable of rhymed lines should rhyme with SHOW but the final syllable must not just rhyme with PEER - it must BE PEER.

So "GO peer", "LOW peer" and "NO peer" would be proper rhymes but "NO beer" "SOW cheer" and "LOW gear" wouldn't.

Now most people (including everyone here) would accept those examples as rhyme because a slightly more relaxed definition is that the last stressed syllable must rhyme and that any subsequent unstressed syllables must also rhyme, but technically that kind of rhyme is less perfect than the one described above.

It goes without saying, I hope, that the stress patterns have to match so that "NO peer" doesn't rhyme with "show PEER".
 
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Thanks, Bob! Even though I do understand much better from your explanation, I think I will still struggle with it to some degree because I don't always hear the stressed syllable. I will have to practice.
Kind regards,
sattva


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Greg S:
Well actually she doesn't! Although lots of people did that including me, the only real 2-syllable rhyme in this entire 33 limerick game is "no peer".


I don't understand. It seems to me that there are several 2-syllable rhymes in those 33 limericks:
show fear, no fear, no gear, blow beer, low pier, so dear, no peer, blow here, pro dear, so clear, Oh dear rhyme with Shopiere, and looker, hooker; was done, was fun rhyme with each other.

quote:
Originally posted by Greg S: If you had decided that the last syllable is the emphasised (Aussie & English spelling) one then "by fear" is just as good a rhyme as "no fear".

Yes, but they're not 2-syllable rhymes.
quote:
Originally posted by Greg S:
But if you had decided the the 2nd last syllable was the emphasised one, then the only valid rhymes are ones where the last syllable is a homophone of the word you are rhyming with such as "no peer" or "low pier"

I don't see that it makes any difference which word you stress, they still rhyme.

I agree with Sattva that there are 2-syllable rhymes in each line of B3's second poem: Shopiere in line 1 rhymes with low-gear and no beer in lines 2 and 5, and pot-clubs and hot-tubs of lines 3 and 4 rhyme with each other. In her first poem, Shopiere, so queer, and no jeer of lines 1,2, and 5 all rhyme. And, according to my count, they all have 2 syllables.
 
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quote:
but the final syllable must not just rhyme with PEER - it must BE PEER

Strictly speaking "it must BE a homophone of PEER. Without that extra qualification "low pier" and "no peer" wouldn't be rhymes.


Regards Greg
 
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quote:
Originally posted by BobHale:
It goes without saying, I hope, that the stress patterns have to match so that "NO peer" doesn't rhyme with "show PEER".

In #26 I read the words as Sho PIERE and no PEER. To my mind they are 2-syllable rhymes.

Wikipedia has an article on perfect rhyme . Is that what you're talking about? It also has an article on rhyme.
 
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quote:
I agree with Sattva that there are 2-syllable rhymes in each line of B3's second poem

Well for want of whatever the technical term is, I'd call the first of each of those syllable pairs a "psuedo-rhyme" and as I said it is worth bonus points, but a limerick that only rhymes the last stressed syllable should not really be considered the lesser limerick.

For example in a previous game in the A-rhyme position where the town was the 4-syllable "Yackandandah", I pseudo-rhymed the last 5 syllables (as in including the one that preceded the name of the town) but technically really only the last 2 syllables properly rhymed, it was:

In the town born of Gold, Yackandandah,
There's a beautiful old Jacaranda,
That grew from a sprig
To be so bloody big
It uprooted a whole back veranda.


Regards Greg
 
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Wow. I have just gone from thinking I was understanding some of this to being totally confused again. I think I will just enter the ones that I like the most and are the most fun. Even though, I received no votes, several of the ones I liked and had a lot of fun writing. I will aim for smiles, at least from myself.
Smile Smile Smile Smile

If you smile too, I will consider it a good limerick.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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And actually when I look back at it now (having been educated in the art of limerick writing over the years by the likes of Bob and Kalleh, who really know their stuff), I realise my Yackandandah limerick doesn't actually meet the primary A-rhyme requirement at all, and despite me thinking it was pretty clever at the time, it probably shouldn't have received any votes.

The 2nd-last is the stressed syllable in YackanDANdah meaning you have to rhyme with DANdah.

JacaRANda is fine, perfect in fact, but "back veRANda is a homophone of Jacaranda in the last two syllables and therefore not strictly speaking a rhyme at all. It is in fact no better than those "boring" Edward Lear limericks that repeat the Line 1 A-rhyme place name identically in Line 5.

All that technical stuff having being said about the rhymes, as Kalleh would tell you, the meter (scansion/rhythm) of the limerick is equally, if not, more important, but that's another whole lesson, involving metrical terms like iamb and anapest.


Regards Greg
 
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I'm confused too. Psuedo-rhymes? They sound like real rhymes to me. Are you sure you're not just nitpicking?
 
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quote:
Psuedo-rhymes? They sound like real rhymes to me. Are you sure you're not just nitpicking?

Almost certainly, nitpicking, and boy have I done more than my share of that (couldn't completely get the nits out of my daughter's bum-length hair till she was 16, so many hours upon hours, with so many treatments that didn't work).

As I said, Kalleh actually thinks it is the meter and rhythm of the piece, that is more important than the rhyme, anyway, and I tend to agree.


Regards Greg
 
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quote:

As I said, Kalleh actually thinks it is the meter and rhythm of the piece, that is more important than the rhyme, anyway, and I tend to agree.


With that said, any recommendations on a good source to learn about meter and rhythm, especially for limericks?


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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iamb and anapest


I know Anepest is in Hungary, but where's Iamb? Greece, perhaps? Roll Eyes
 
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Here's a site that expands on some of the subjects we're invoking:

http://www.billkirkwrites.com/rhyminghistory.html
 
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With that said, any recommendations on a good source to learn about meter and rhythm, especially for limericks?

This thread from this site, started by Bob Hale, at Kalleh's request Limerick metre and rhyme, is a good start.


Regards Greg
 
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I don't see that it makes any difference which word you stress, they still rhyme.


By that reasoning these two lines rhyme

The was a young fellow of Lundy
Who came on a fast train from Dundee

but they don't because "Lundy" is pronounced "LUN-dee" while "Dundee" is pronounced "dun DEE". To make it rhyme you would need to pronounce Dundee as DUN-dee. Stress matters.

Lundy

Dundee

This message has been edited. Last edited by: BobHale,
 
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Thanks for the links. Smile


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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quote:
Originally posted by BobHale:
quote:
I don't see that it makes any difference which word you stress, they still rhyme.


By that reasoning these two lines rhyme

The was a young fellow of Lundy
Who came on a fast train from Dundee

I was talking about the no peer or low pier Greg had mentioned. I misread his post and thought he was saying they didn't rhyme. I meant that it didn't matter if you stressed the first or second syllable in those couplets, as long as you were consistent. In that case you could stress whichever you wanted, but you could only make Lundy and Dundee rhyme by mispronouncing one of them, which isn't kosher in my book, though I've seen some limericks that do just that.
 
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And I, in turn, misunderstood your post. I thought you were saying that stress patterns didn't matter in rhyming.
Glad that's cleared up.

Big Grin
 
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quote:
the no peer or low pier Greg had mentioned

These only rhyme if the 2nd-last syllable is stressed. If the last syllable is the stressed/emphasised one, then they are homophones, not rhymes.

If you said they rhymed, then so would lines 1, 2 and 5 in this, which they do not.

There once was a Bishop named Tutu,
Who was asked to compare one to two,
But the Bishop was praying
And ended up saying,
"Two to one is as one is to two, too."


Regards Greg
 
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Which reminds me:

1 1 was a racehorse,
2 2 was 1 2,
1 1 1 1 race -
2 2 1 1 2.


Regards Greg
 
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quote:
1 1 was a racehorse,
2 2 was 1 2,
1 1 1 1 race -
2 2 1 1 2.

For the confused, read as:

"One-Won" was a racehorse
"Tutu" was one too,
"One-Won" won one race -
"Tutu" won one too.


Regards Greg
 
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And sattva, don't be put off by all this gobbledegook.

I used to win this game reasonably frequently, when I just wrote limericks off the top of my head that sounded okay to me, but now that I am well "versed" in how to write them properly, I hardly ever get a vote, let alone win the Poll.


Regards Greg
 
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Here's one for you.

12 + 144 + 20 + 3√4
——————————— + (5 × 11) = 92 + 0
7

That 92 is supposed to be 9 squared.

Give up? Go to Math Mayhem for translation.

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