Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Foreign Words    Que tiene usted?
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Que tiene usted? Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted
Are there any Spanish scholars here? I took Spanish in high school, but that was about it. My daughter brought up on Facebook that my mom used to say "Que tiene usted" to mean "What's the matter with you?" Literally it means, "What do you have?", though could this be a saying in Spanish that really means "What's the matter with you?" For example, and I wrote this on her facebook page, we have a lot of sayings that wouldn't make sense when literally translated - like "apple of your eye."
 
Posts: 23290 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
There are a lot of idioms using tener in Spanish. See a good dictionary entry on same.

All languages m as far as I know, have idioms.

If you google que tiene Usted what's the matter you get a bunch of explanations about this idiom in Spanish: one here.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5085 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
The French, "Ca va?" can be answered with the same phrase; only the intonation and punctuation changes.
 
Posts: 4432 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
Yes, that's what I thought. I do remember one from my Spanish class - el codo meaning " stingey ."
 
Posts: 23290 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of bethree5
posted Hide Post
Sorry I missed this in Feb, Kalleh. Not that I am a 'scholar' in Spanish, but I teach it to PreK, & read it regularly. Just love that use of 'codo', esp as a gesture! That one I'd never encountered (but I don't feel bad-- your link says it's used 'in some regions of Spain'; I am more experienced in LatAmer usage).

I would have responded: to me, '¿Qué tiene usted?' is more easily grasped by an English speaker [What do you have? (I'm not holding anything, but I have a long face or am walking stiffly): I have a problem, I have a backache.] than 'What's the matter with you?' which strikes me as idiomatic. A novice at English might translate 'matter' as substance or topic, & be puzzled by our expression.
 
Posts: 2049 | Location: As they say at 101.5FM: Not New York... Not Philadelphia... PROUD TO BE NEW JERSEY!Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Foreign Words    Que tiene usted?

Copyright © 2002-12