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Edit July 11 by Wordcrafter: I've added here a list of words for which we already have limericks, so that you can easily access it whenever you come to this thread. It will be updated periodically.

a; a cappela; aa; Aaaron; Aachen; aah; aal; 'a'ali'i; aam; aardvark; aardwolf; Aaron; Aaron, Hank; aaronic; Aaron's rod; aasvogel

ab absurdo; ab ovo; aba; aba; abaca; abacination; abacist; aback; abaculo; abacus; Abaddon; abaft; abaiser; Abalard; Abalienation; abalone; abampere; abandon; abanet; abarcy; abase; abash; Abasia; abask; abask; abask; abate; abatis; abatis; Abatis; abattoir; abature; Abaxial; abb; abb; Abba; Abbevillian; abbey-lubber; abbot; abbozzo; abbreviation; ABC Powers; ABCs; abderian; abdest; abdication; abditory; Abdomen; abdominous; abducens; abducens; abduct; Abdul-Jabbar, Kareem; abeam; abecedarian; abed; abeigh; Abel; abelmosk; aberdevine; aberglaube; Abernethy; aberrant; aberration; Abet; abettor; abevacuation; abeyance; abherent; abhor; abhorrent; abide; ability; abiogenesis; abiotic; abjure; ablactation; ablation; ablative absolute; ablaut; ablaze; able-bodied seaman; ablome; ablution; ablutomania; abnegation; abnormal psychology; ABO system; abogado; abolish; abolitionist; abominabe snowman; abominable; aborigines; abortian; aboulia; abound; about; about-face; above; aboveboard; aboveground; abracadabra; abraction; abranciate; abranciate; abrasion; abraxas; Abraxas; abraxas; Abraxas; abrazitic; abreaction; abreast; abridged; abrim; abrin; abroach; abroad; abroad; abrogated; abrupt; abscess; abscissa; abscission; abscond; abseil; absence; absent without leave; absentee; absent-minded; absinthe; absolute alcohol; absolute zero; absolutely; absolution; absorbed; absquatulate; abstain; abstemious; abstention; absterge; absterge; abstergent; abstinence; abstinent; abstract; abstracted; abstraction; abstration; abstruse; absurd; Abu Dhabi; abubble; abubble; abubble; abulia; abulic; abumbral; abundance; abuse; abusive; abusive; abutment; abvolt; abwatt; abysmal; abyss; abyssal; Abyssinia

acacia; academic; Acadian; acajou; acalculia; acanaceous; acanthocephalan; acanthorcephalan; acapnia; acapnotic; Acapulco Gold; acaraphobia; acardiac; acarpous; acaudite; accede; accelerando; accelerator; accent; accept; acceptable; accident; accident-prone; accidie; Accipiter; accismus; acclaim; acclimate; acclimatization; acclivity; accolades; accolent; accommodate; accompany; accomplice; accomplish; accord; accordion; accost; account; accrescimento; accresense; accretion; accretion disc; accretious; accrue; accubation; acculturation; accuracy; accuse; accustomed; ace; acephalic; acequia; acerbate; acerbic; aceric; acescent; acetabuliferous; acetic; acetic acid; acetone; acetylene torch; acey-deucy; achaetous; acharnement; ache; achievable; Achilles; achromatic; achromic; acicular; acid rain; acid rock; acid-head; acinaciform; ack-ack; ackamarackus; acme; acne; acnestis; acolyte; acopic; acorn; acosmic; acouchy; acousticophobia; acousto-optics; acquaintance; acquiesce; acquire; acquital; acraein; acre; acrid; acridity; acrimonious; acrita; acrobatic; acrocephalic; acrochordon; acrolect; acroleutic; acrolith; acromegaly; acromion; acronychal; acronym; acropolis; across; acrostic; acroteria; Actaeon; acting; actinic; Actinomyosis; actinotherapy; action; active immunity; activity; acton; actor; actual; actuality; actuary; acuity; aculeate; acumen; acupuncture; acushla; acutely; acyanoblepsia; acyclic

ad infinitum; ad infinitum; ad libitum; adactylous; adactylous; adagio; Adam; Adam's apple; Adams, John; adaptation; adbuct; add; addax; adder; addict; addiction; addition; addle; address; adenosis; adept; adequacy; adespota; adhere; adiaphonetic; adiaphory; adieu; adios; adipocere; adipocyte; adipose; adipsy; adit; adjacent; adjective; adjoining; adjourn; adjudicate; adjuration; adjust; adjutant; ad-lib; admaxillary; Admetus; adminicula; administration; Admiralty; admire; admissable; admission; admit; admit; admittance; admonition; adobe; Adobo; adolescent; Adonis; adopt; adoption; adorable; adore; adorn; adrenal; adrenal gland; adrenocorticotropic; adroit; adstcititious; adulation; adult; adultery; adumbration; adumbrellar; advance; advantageous; Advent; adventists; adverb; adverse; adversifoliate; adversity; advertise; advertizing; advice; advisable; advocate; advowson; adze;

agility; agromegaly; anal; apocalyptic; apodytic; apostrophe; auld; epicaricacy



CJ's OEDILF project has been amazingly successful...beyond my wildest dreams, anyway, though I don't know about his! Wink

While CJ tries to set up his own site (which I surely will be a part of), I suggest that we keep up with the limericks. We have been on a roll. Everyday the excitement has increased. I would just hate to see any enthusiasm for this project dampen. What is the harm in people posting word limericks, with the letters aa, ab, ac, or ad? After all, if CJ doesn't like them, they can be deleted with a click of the key. While I don't want to be disrespectful to CJ, I feel it is a grave mistake to cut off those posts now.

How's about it guys....and CJ? Let's continue. Richard and I will continue to collect, alphabetize, and date all limericks.

The new ones can be put in this thread, at least until CJ gives us the go ahead with the rest of the threads. I will then cut and past them in the correct places.

Don't forget the check the word list to be sure that your word hasn't been used. I will get us started with a brand new word:


Aachen

Aachen's a city that's German,
Damaged in war by the vermin.
Belgium is near,
Pilsner their beer....
Too much...and they'll hear a long sermon!

Perfect it's not (have I ever claimed to be an expert on these?), but it is a start!

Let's post some more word limericks, please?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: wordcrafter,
 
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Okay, I'll bite. But if we're busted by the Wordcraft cops, it wasn't my idea!

Aberglaube's the predisposition
To believe obsolete superstition,
Even when your old wife
Tells you "not on your life!
This tale fills me with utmost suspicion!"

An Abernethy, so I've heard,
Is a biscuit, whose batter is stirred
Up with carraway seeds.
But for my snacking needs,
A jelly-filled donut's preferred.

There once was a friar named Xavier
Who engaged in aberrant behavior.
He was so out of line,
Other monks did decline
To pray for his soul to their Saviour.

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The Lone Ranger spent summers abask
In the sun, leading Tonto to ask:
"Kemosabe: skin cancer?"
To which he did answer,
"Don't worry--I'm wearing my mask!"

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Abet

To aid and abet's to support,
When criminals plan to cavort.
It's surely a crime,
Committed by slime.
Though...soon they'll be cases in court!
 
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I'm going to try for interesting words, but since this is for fun and not for Chris's project, I don't see any need for the aa/ab/ac/ad rule here.

The Fifth of July
Here is a fact apodytic:
With an oversized holiday picnic,
Too much fireworks and beer,
Tomorrow, I fear,
I am likely to be quite a sick hic.
(And my death will be apocalyptic.)
 
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PS: Perhaps that last line should be
. . . . . .And my belches are apocalyptic.

What do you think?
 
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If you're lost and you need to retrace
all your steps you should do it with grace.
Don't stumble unknowing.
Please watch where you're going.
It's easy: you must about-face.
 
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If you want your shortcomings ignored
And your public approval restored:
If you smoke, don't inhale;
Keep your eyes off her tail;
And your finances all aboveboard.


You remember that pain in your head
After last night's consumption of red?
And you're still seeing double
But your brats are abubble
Squealing, "Come on, dad! Get out of bed!"
 
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I heard of your fabulous plan,
To make the Oxford Dictionary Scan,
It appeals to me,
As it's so loony,
So I'll help you as much as I can Smile
 
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Some forms of Poetry are Just Too Difficult
Have you ever attempted the lost trick
Of composing a double-acrostic?
The task is so knotty
That my speech becomes naughty,
Abusively vulgar and caustic.

(Well, the 3rd and 4th lines rhyme where I come from. Smile)
 
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Welcome to Karl McNaughton!
Your excellent poem first-begotten.
Gives me predisposition
For your composition,
So give us one more. Have you got'un?

Edit: Please also see second post in this thread.

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The clumsy chef at the IHOP
Lost his grip, and his omelette went plop.
So he took up his pan,
Cracked three eggs and began
Ab ovo, i.e., from the top.
 
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Chris...

We simply can't stop posting limericks
Once started, we're addicts, NEED our FIX!
We can't go cold turkey,
We'll get twitchy and jerky,
Get that site up! (to avoid future conflicts)
 
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I'll try eating away at the early parts of the list (time and my impatient offspring permitting):

While ink will resist the eraser
Here's somthing perhaps even baser
When ivory's burned
and its charcoal's returned
That substance is known as abaiser
 
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Thanks all for contributing! Wink

ABO System
The ABO system of blood tells
The classification of cells.
A's reject B's,
O's to O please.
AB? It receives, but repels!
 
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Tim, Smile
Your Ab ovo limerick is delicious.

Kalleh,
Your ABO System limerick is good but I couldn't quite get the rhythm in the first line to match the rest of the limerick.

If I spell out A-B-O I get the end rhyme of L1 falling on a weak beat i.e. the A-b-o SYStem of BLOOD tells, which mismatches the rhythm of the second line. If I pronounce the acronym as a two-syllable word, then I have to place a weird stress onto the second syllable of system i.e. the Abo sysTEM of blood TELLS.

May I suggest a minor change to the first two lines?

The ABO system excels:
It classifies human blood cells.
A's reject B's,
O's to O please.
AB? It receives, but repels!
 
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The bartender, to his chagrin,
Could find no more drink in his inn.
A guest said with reproach:
"Your casks are abroach!
They were punctured. and lost all their gin!"
 
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Beautifully reconfigured, Virge. Thank you! I had meant it as being read this way, but yours definitely is better:

The AB O system of blood tells
I have always been told that a weak beat before or after the strong ones is okay in a limerick, though not in a double dactyl. However, I know that CJ and the other expert limerists (if not a word, it should be!) say that if you include those weak beats, the rest of the lines should match them. I didn't do that.

I just don't find limericks very easy!
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
CJ's OEDILF project has been amazingly successful...beyond my wildest dreams, anyway, though I don't know about his! I tend to dream bigly. We're not a hundredth of the way there yet!

While CJ tries to set up his own site (which I surely will be a part of), I suggest that we keep up with the limericks. We have been on a roll. Everyday the excitement has increased. I would just hate to see any enthusiasm for this project dampen.

I suppose an explanation is in order. When I posted the request for you all to hang on to your limericks for just a bit, I was responding to what I perceived were the wishes of the administration of this site. The goals of the OEDILF and those of the Wordcraft site, while dovetailing in many places, are not identical. My feeling was that there was a desire for the OEDILF to take wing at its earliest possiblity rather than at a leisurely pace. In a way, I felt like a college graduate who was still living at home with his parents, lounging on the family couch watching TV in the afternoons with Mom & Dad looking down and saying "Well, what now?"

One reason for the delay was that I wanted to get all my coordination with the Oxford University press (legal office and others) straight before starting the new site BUT it is also a truism that if you wait for all the lights to be green before making a trip, you'll never leave your driveway. My post requesting a suspension of input was only a notice that my full efforts would now be devoted to establishing the new site and not, as had been the case in the past few weeks, in workshopping the limericks.


In no way, shape, or form was this intended to imply that I was requesting that people not post to the Wordcraft site as a whole, as was misunderstood by at least one individual, but that I was temporarily (very) closing the door to limerick submissions so that I could attend to other matters. This is now being done. No estimated start-up date yet for the new site but it is on the front burner.

How's about it guys....and CJ? Let's post some more word limericks, please? I've got no problem with this. Also, I'm pleased to see that other contributors are joining in with the workshopping process. Considering the size and the scope of the project overall, it was never my intention to do it all on my own. Thanks again for all help past, present, and future.
 
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A postscript:

Work continues on the new site and the largest part of the delay is caused by none other than yours truly for two reasons. First, I am regretfully behind the power curve when it comes to computer smarst and, second, the scope of this project is both ambitious (some would say overly so) ("some"?? Who am I kidding - "Most"!) and growing almost daily.

Did want to take a moment to welcome two more contributors Karl Macnaughton and Crelm. (And, by the way, do I earn any points for spotting the very early and somewhat obscure Monty Python reference??)

I'll be back up editing again asap, time permiting but, in the meantime, feel free to massage each other's work. Workshopping will always be a primary aspect of the OEDILF.
 
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What's hairy and musky and round,
And typically can be found
Near a Tripoli pub?
It's the abelmosk shrub
Either that, or a Libyan hound.

Go website!
 
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Acrita, as you might know,
Are, among phyla, so low,
They've no nervous tissue;
Their one pressing issue
Is whether to swim to or fro.
 
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CJ remarked, "In a way, I felt like a college graduate who was still living at home with his parents, lounging on the family couch watching TV in the afternoons with Mom & Dad looking down and saying 'Well, what now?' "

Sounds familiar, CJ. I got me one of those.

[Hey people! Don't jump on the bad grammar; CJ knows it's intentional!]
 
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Continuing on my serial romp through the as yet unlimericized words, I humbly submit:

An insatiable maiden named Marcy
with an interesting form of abarcy
was compelled to consume
any form of legume
to be found in the ground in Canarsie.

If there's someone you wish to abase
thus to sever completely from grace
Then perhaps you should run
once your victim's undone
So to vanish with nary a trace

The bacteria gently abask
in the medium here in my flask
from their genial world
are most brutally hurled
Once my bunsen has warmed to its task

A shepherd whose garments were drab
Said "they're woven from only the abb"
"I must sell all the best
of the wool, and the rest
has of quality, only a dab"

I'll try to do justice to "Abbey-laird" in my next outing. I fear it won't be pretty...
 
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My first try

Acropolis

A greek acropolis was the best
For it looked down upon all the rest
Fortified it was safe
And Spartan generals did chafe
As they retreated at thier soldiers request

Adept(its been done many times before, but I needed something to warm up on)

There was a thief named Ned
Who wanted to hang onto his head
Adept he was
At evading the fuzz
So he died of old age in his bed
 
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Welcome, welcome, Ian! Smile Big Grin Wink Cool

Did want to take a moment to welcome two more contributors Karl Macnaughton and Crelm. (And, by the way, do I earn any points for spotting the very early and somewhat obscure Monty Python reference??)
I am getting all behind on my welcomes of people...and I am forgetting whom I have welcomed and whom I haven't! So, I have decided if new posters post above the equator, I will give them a proper welcome. It they stay here in the OEDILF, well, I might not get everyone!

I had sent QT (who writes a regular column about words and language), from the Chicago Sun Times, a note about CJ's project, and I got a call from him today. He is going to contact CJ about an article. I suspect in the not-to-distant future CJ will be appearing on the Today Show and Jay Leno! Wink
 
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This project, though not unambitious,
Remains, at its heart, adscititious
To the real OED;
They'll permit, hopefully,
Our efforts without being officious.
 
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Two attempts on the same word, again. I'm not one hundred percent satisfied with either, so suggestions for improvement are welcome...


The telescope NASA calls Hubble
Examines interstellar rubble.
The photos it sends,
Proof the universe has ends,
Render astronomers abubble!

Sensitive skin chafes at stubble;
Razorburn’s its own kind of trouble.
A brush and a cake
Too much effort take;
Thank heaven for aerosols, abubble.
 
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Mary Jane to the manor was born.
She frequently chose to adorn
Herself with gold rings,
But her sumptuous things,
Often filled her detractors with scorn.

re: abubble. I don't understand the second one (last line, anyway); the first needs work on lines 2 and 5, I think. How about "Investigates stars and their rubble" for line 2?

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Maybe I'm stepping out of line here, but I'd like to suggest we go back to placing new limericks in the threads set up for them. There are excellent limericks being posted and quite a few with the potential for excellence with the help of a little workshopping.

I've noticed some more word duplications lately. I think this is inevitable as a few of us try to finish off the ab- words. Before starting a word from the list of ab- words it's worth doing a search using the Find function. If the word you are about to versify only shows up in the "OEDILF words still needing limericks" thread, then it's a good target. (Of course, don't hold back a brilliant inspiration just because a word has already been done.)
 
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Virge, what you've said merits discussion, and I've started a new thread for it, titled Organizational thoughts and suggestions.
 
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I agree with wordcrafter (see his new thread); hence:

admaxillary

The pugilist never foresaw
The punch he took from the southpaw.
The damage was scary,
And admaxillary:
It fractured, severely, his jaw.

admission

It doesn't take much erudition
To know that "entree," in addition
To "acknowledgment,"
Are both excellent
Words for defining admission.
 
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ADIPOSE

The body that's quite adipose
Can cause a response lachrymose
From most teenage girls
When trying their twirls
Wearing clothing revealing and close.
 
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First off, a big thanks to Tim Alborn who is rapidly becoming one of our more prolific limericists. Your meter, the primary problem it seems for most limerick writers, is almost always dead on and I very much enjoy your sense of humor. A few notes:

"Aberglaube" and "Abernethy" were both great meter- and definition-wise and I assume they're actual words, right? My library has the 1933 edition of the OED and neither were in it and Dictionary.com wasn't aware of either one either. (That's to be pronounced "EE-ther one EYE-ther" to avoid repetition.)

Let me add my accolades for your "ab ovo" as well. Great meter, perfect definition, snappy last line and with a pun - a winner!

quote:
Originally posted by Tim Alborn:
The Lone Ranger spent summers _abask_
In the sun, leading Tonto to ask:
"Kemosabe: skin cancer?"
To which he did answer,
"Don't you worry--I'm wearing my mask!"


This one I wouldn't edit but let me use it to workshop with if I may. Using an "X" for a stressed syllable and a "." for an unstressed, this one comes out:

. . X . . X . . X
. . X . . X . . X
. . X . . X .
. X . . X .
. . X . . X . . X .

You notice that lines 3 & 4 aren't identical. Some limerick "experts" will say that this makes the meter less than perfect but I disagree. The meter is great since the stresses all fall where they should when the piece is spoken as if it were natural conversation. In fact, the last line could lose a syllable by changing "Don't you worry..." to "Don't worry..." without harming the piece at all if you had wanted it that way.

When anyone finds themself struggling over meter, mapping it out this way is often helpful. I use my X's and .'s all the time.

With "abroach," does gin come in casks? I suppose... It is an inn after all. Just a quibble - It's a fine piece!

"Abelmosk" (which, as a sidenote, comes from the Arabic for "father of musk" which I find poetic in of itself) makes for a nice piece but I don't get the last line. I couldn't find any reference to this word being a breed of dog. Am I missing something?

Your "acrita" piece works fine only when it's known that the accent in on the first syllable. Especially when words are obscure, the correct pronunciation will precede the verse in the OEDILF.

"Adscititious," "admaxillary," and "admission" are all fine but "adorn" doesn't hit the same bulls-eye. The third line "HerSELF with diamond RINGS" seems to have too many syllables especially since some people pronounce "diamond" with three syllables. Wouldn't a one-syllable word work better? "Gold," maybe, or "huge"? Plus if you wanted to change the 4th line "All" to "But" you could downgrade the 3rd line semi-colon to a simple comma and make it a tad easier on the reader (some of the dimmer ones, anyway) but this last is the most minor of matters.

Great stuff! Keep it comin'.
 
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A few more notes -

Kalleh, your "Aachen," "abet" and the revised "ABO System" are all first rate. Your limericks are better than you give them credit for even if they do present a struggle for you.

A couple of questions, though. Were vermin actually a problem in Aachen during WW2? If this were the case, this is exactly the kind of thing that I would include as a little sidenote to the piece so that it wouldn't look as though you were referring to the Allied forces as vermin. I know you weren't but this is just the kind of thing that inspires some idiots to write outraged letters. Same with identifying people who abet criminals as slime themselves but, Hey, if we catch grief from some criminally abetting slime out there, I won't sweat it!

Also, I had a suggestion for the first part of your "ABO System" piece but I like Virge's better. Nice workshopping!


Speaking of Virge, very well done on "about-face," "aboveboard," and "abubble." You're another Contributing Editor who has a firm handle on meter.


And to Eric L. A., similar kudos, meter-wise, especially for "abase" but all your stuff scans well. Your "abb" piece hit the mark as far as defining the word was concerned which was why I had left that term up in the "not covered" list. The first piece (Jerry T.'s) was a good one but was based on the 1933 OED definition which, frankly, didn't make any sense.

Note to all - Eric's use of "Marcy" as a rhyme for "abarcy" is well within the rules. You are certainly welcome to use proper names unless it gets to the point of ridiculousness such as:
There once was a Mr. Breebandonment
Who suffered, when young, from abandonment.

Like Popeye used to say, "Enough is too much!"


Hic, your welcoming limericks are especially sharp. Feel free to take on welcoming duties full time if you like. And regarding the "naughty/knotty" rhyme, this is fine by me, especially when you point out that it's a regional thing. Just don't try to sell me on the idea that, where you come from, they both rhyme with "prawn."


Last but defintely not least, excellent piece on "adipose," Jo. If anyone out there is unfamiliar with Double Dactyls, I highly recommend her work on that thread where she was recently named Empress. Congrats all around, Jo!
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Ian:
My first try

Acropolis

A greek acropolis was the best
For it looked down upon all the rest
Fortified it was safe
And Spartan generals did chafe
As they retreated at thier soldiers request

Adept(its been done many times before, but I needed something to warm up on)

There was a thief named Ned
Who wanted to hang onto his head
Adept he was
At evading the fuzz
So he died of old age in his bed

Excellent first tries and welcome aboard, Ian.

For "Acropolis," could I suggest the first line "The Acropolis, in Greece, was the best" since it was one particular place (hence the capital "A") and saying it this way presents the stresses more naturally. Actually, "the aCROPilis, GREECE, was the BEST" would work better meter-wise but this way it looks like an address ("Acropolis, Greece" as if they get mail that way) where the extra syllable "in" can be spoken quickly enough for you to get by with it.

Having said that, though, were there multiple acropolises ("acropoli"??) back then as your piece seems to suggest? Ancient Greek history is not my strong suit. Ditto the soldiers requesting to retreat - did that actually happen? Doesn't seem very Spartan of them.

In the second, the meter of the first line "there WAS a THIEF named NED" is, sorry, totally off. A limerick requires an anapest meter ("da da DUM, da da DUM, da da DUM" or slight variations thereof) which is easily fixed here by making it "there ONCE was a THIEF name of NED." Limericks very often begin this way as in "There once was a (two-syllable word with the stress on the first syllable) named (name of the same number of syllables as the ending words in lines 2 & 5). Your last line, on the other hand, is in perfect anapest meter: "so he DIED of old AGE in his BED."

Line 3 is short just one unstressed syllable but this is also easily remedied as "aDEPT though he WAS."

Good stuff. Keep em' comin'!
 
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quote:
Originally posted by rbarenblat:
The telescope NASA calls Hubble
Examines interstellar rubble.
The photos it sends,
Proof the universe has ends,
Render astronomers _abubble_!


I like Tim's suggestion for a 2nd line. How about:

The telescope NASA calls Hubble
Investigates stars and their rubble.
The photos it sends
Proves the universe ends
Which renders that crew (or "those folks") all abubble.

With the second one, Jeeze, I dunno. The following story may or may not be applicable.

Back in the days when department stores closed by the dinner hour, the owner of Bloomingdale's invested heavily in a Broadway play that was simply not coming together. An outside writer was brought in to see the play in rehearsal so that maybe he could offer advice on how to fix it up. After a full viewing, he went to the store owner, put his hand on his shoulder and said, "If I were you, I'd close the show and keep the store open later."

Now, does this mean I think your second piece is unsalvagable? Not in the least. I just don't know what to do with it...
 
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Thanks as usual, Chris, for the feedback. I'll make the changes to adorn, which I also has misgivings about; and I think I will drop the "you" in the L.R.'s reply.

Re: dictionaries, I've been mainly using "The Concise Oxford Dictionary" (OUP, 1964), which suspiciously lacks "English" in its title, and hence may be guilty of superfluous Germanisms. I found "admaxillary" on my electronic OED via my college library's website, but it was also in the "Shorter OED" in my living room downstairs. I'm just surrounded by dictionaries, I guess.

Re: "casks"; probably not. I could change "gin" to vin, but that would be kind of pretentious.

Re: the dog in "abelmosk." The idea was, this was an alternate answer to the riddle, not an alternate definition of abelmosk.
 
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Here's one for Bob Hale:

The toddler received as a gift
A present which gave her a lift:
A helium balloon!
By mid-afternoon,
She was floating past Harrow, adrift.
 
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On searching for "Abbey-laird" online, I discovered that it seems to appear mainly in word lists used to obfuscate spam messages. Additional definitions failed to abound, so I'll go rather slavishly with Chris's from the unfulfilled word list: "an insolvent debtor sheltering in the precincts of Holyrood Abbey"

When once to a beggar compared,
he sneered through his teeth, which he bared,
"Though I'm near Holyrood
I can buy my own food
I am certainly no Abbey-laird!"

Apologies for duplication of this next one, but I was just having too much fun with it. I can't guarantee I won't submit another, as I can't seem to stop thinking about rhyming "fainting" and "underpainting"...

On seeing the artist's abbozzo,
the buyer became overwrought, so
the painter, that wretch
had to throw out the sketch,
because he and his patron had fought so!

I'd also be interested in views on the legality of blurring the second and third lines. Interestingly, it seems to work equally well with the longer pause before or after the word 'so'.
My original intent was to force the otherwise straightforward prose into limerick form through the odd line break, but one could also argue that "overwrought so" is an acceptable substitution for "so overwrought". In this case I'd remove the comma after overwrought, and add "that" to the start of the third line to preserve the meter.
 
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T.A.: I agree that the L.R.'s reply sounds more natural without the "you" and that "gin" is better than "vin," regardless of the actual sense this minor point may or may not make. Yes, whatever dictionaries you use to get words from will be fine since the new OED, if reports I've heard are correct, will incorporate them ALL. And the dog in "abelmosk"? ... Well, let me put it this way. In the new site there will be a feature with which each contributor will be allowed to select the top 10% of his or her own work to be "showcased." I would suggest you not pick this one. "Adrift" is excellent, though. Great meter as always.


E.L.A.: The definition for "abbey-laird" came from the 1933 edition of the OED though I assume it's still in the newer one - those people never throw anything out. And do not be afraid to duplicate previously written words! Your "abbozzo" is excellent.

Regarding the "legality" of the blurring of lines, it's perfectly fine by me. In making any decision regarding the quality of a limerick, my first concern is how well does it scan when it is read as if it were being spoken in a normal conversational voice. Others prefer a distinct separation between lines, but I don't. As long as the "blurring" (as you call it and for lack of a better term at the moment) doesn't throw the meter off, I say it's fine. Your "abbozzo" piece is an excellent example of this being successfully pulled off.
 
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A thermodynamically static
Container is adiabatic.
Its walls are impassable;
Heat's not amassable.
The same can't be said for my attic.
 
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AD INFINITUM

When asked, Jo, how long can you write 'em?
I replied, Maybe ad infinitum.
It seems there's no end
As my wrist I do bend
To compose little poems to delight 'em.

Note: I was tempted to write "pomes" rather than "poems" both for the rhythm and as a nod to the idea that pomes are a sort of born out of wedlock child (with a bow to our English friend) form of poetry.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: jo,
 
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ABJURE & ADJURE

When using abjure and adjure
The speaker must really be sure
Of which one means oath;
Is either or both?
Ab's away and ad's toward I aver.

adjure, be sure, and aver... dicey but they do rhyme.
 
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Please see the note I added at the top of this this thread. Kalleh, sorry to disturb your post there.
 
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quote:
rbarenblat:
The telescope NASA calls Hubble
Examines interstellar rubble.
The photos it sends,
Proof the universe has ends,
Render astronomers _abubble_!

quote:
CJS:
I like Tim's suggestion for a 2nd line. How about:

The telescope NASA calls Hubble
Investigates stars and their rubble.
The photos it sends
Proves the universe ends
Which renders that crew (or "those folks") all abubble.


I suggest:

The telescope NASA calls Hubble
Investigates stars and their rubble.
The photos it sends
(Proof the cosmos has ends)
Leave admiring astronomers abubble!
 
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ahimsa (wordnerd)
Here's a far-eastern doctrine worth seeing:
Ahimsa: "harm no living being"
(from ahims, non-injure).
Be not an infringer
Upon any creature’s well-being.

invective (wordnerd)
When you’ve purchased a product defective,
Cursing’s a useful corrective.
Do not speak lightly
And very politely.
Indulge in a little invective.
 
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abirritant

I suffered from great disappointment,
when I went to my doctor's appointment.
He could not cure the itch
that was making me twitch,
for he had no abirritant ointment.
 
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The limerick list is truly extraordinary. (No such word as "abherent" though (qv).)

So are we free to plunge into the aether?

Apollo's Aeolian harp
Always sounded, he thought, rather sharp.
Then a gust rose, whereat
It now sounded quite flat!
To the wind-god he hastened to carp.

Aeolus ruled over the wind.
The Greeks knew against him they had sinned,
When the javelins they tossed
Either ended up lost
Or 'twixt ground and their garments got pinned

When your penny takes on a green hue,
It''s not because Abe's sick of you.
Its copper has rusted;
Your coin is encrusted
With aeruginous-pigmented goo.

Most beasts settle down on the flooring
In the winter, to do their deep snoring.
But a few aestivate:
They spend their torpid state
In the summer, when TV is boring.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Tim Alborn,
 
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Ah - lucky post #13:

abject

When everything's hopelessly wrecked,
I might say that my suffering's abject.
It describes the condition
brought on by attrition
of all that might earn me respect.
 
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