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Tim, you inspired my 'aestivation' limerick below, but it’s really not a definition. Perhaps we could put my limerick under 'estivation', with a cross-reference to yours?

aestivation (Hic)
Some say summer is for recreation,
But me? I prefer relaxation.
In my hammock I snore
And (to use metaphor)
I’m not lazy. It’s just aestivation.

aegrotat (Hic)
A student who misses a test, sir,
Is nevertheless no transgressor,
If he can produce
A doctor’s excuse
(Called an aegrotat) for his professor.
 
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aeolipyle (T. Alborn)

A tea-kettle's whistle, I'd deem
Sufficient for measuring steam.
Some others, meanwhile
Use an aeolipyle
If their taste for precision's extreme.

Eric: your limericks are truly excellent. Shouldn't the first letters in each line be capitalized, though? And (hic) is aestivation a "metaphor" (I write, procraestivating like crazy...)?

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Tim Alborn,
 
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Re "wordcraft limericks":

Please remove my (not the other) "adactylous" which, as Chris correctly noted at the time, unfortunately doesn't apply to cats. And you dropped one of my favorites, if I do say so (see below). Also, some of the edited limericks from this thread appear in their original unimproved form. I assume all this will be better once Chris's website is up, but in case it makes a difference I thought I'd go ahead and point these things out--it would be nice to avert too much getting lost in the transition.

adnoun

"The meek" and "the red, white, and blue"
Are adnouns, they are, through and through.
Adjectival at heart,
They'll lip-synch the part
Of a noun if politely asked to.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Tim Alborn,
 
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Tim - Given the quality of your own efforts, I really appreciate your appreciation! I'm especially fond of your "harrowing" tale of the helium balloon...

I've must confess to relative ignorance of the rules (or at least one of them). I've been capitalizing embedded sentences, but a quick perusal of the posts here suggests I ought to capitalize by line.

Abjudicate

To abjudicate means to deny
From the bench in the courtroom, on high.
You might find it grueling,
To appeal such a ruling,
But it certainly can't hurt to try.
 
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Tim wrote:
quote:
Please remove my (not the other) "adactylous" which, as Chris correctly noted at the time, unfortunately doesn't apply to cats. And you dropped one of my favorites, if I do say so (see below). Also, some of the edited limericks from this thread appear in their original unimproved form. I assume all this will be better once Chris's website is up, but in case it makes a difference I thought I'd go ahead and point these things out--it would be nice to avert too much getting lost in the transition.


There are lots of intermediate limericks in the collection. It also lacks the editorial notes. Don't worry too much. The new site will solve all.

As wordcrafter notes, CJS has access to the archived threads so we haven't lost information. I have a first-pass, rough database of the limericks, change history and notes from the threads (including your snappy adactylous limerick both pre- and post-workshopping) in preparation for exporting to the final database format.
 
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aedes / anopheles (Hic)
The aedes (that's Greek for "displease")
Mosquito spreads certain disease
(Dengue, yellow fever),
But flu spreads by either
A breath or a cough or a sneeze,
And malaria's anopheles.
 
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aetiological (T. Alborn)

The medical student lacked zest
On his aetiological test.
He proffered long pauses,
But not any causes,
Which made his professor distressed.

(I think I'll stick with the five-line limerick form...)
 
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Tim and I seem to be batting the ae- words back and forth like a shuttlecock. Big Grin

aegir / bore / abhorrent (Hic)
If an aegir, a huge wave that's tidal,
Is approaching when I am outside I'll
Run fast as I can.
As you should too, man,
Unless of course you’re suicidal.

Such a wave is called also a bore,
No less than an aegir, no more.
A bore is a torrent
Completely abhorrent,
Exactly as mentioned before.
 
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aeriform

(a short history of the internet bubble)

The aeriform companies' shares
Rose high, then ran into some snares.
The feds gave an order
Against clicks without mortar,
And soon dot-com bulls became bears.

Your serve, hic.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Tim Alborn,
 
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Tim,
Brilliant limerick!
I don't have access to the OED, but in other dictionaries I find aeriform, not aeroform.
 
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aerobatics
See the spins, rolls and loops of stunt-flying!
Gape at stalls; thrill to dives death-defying!
All such acrobatics
Are called aerobatics:
Entertaining and yet terrifying.
 
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aerie (Hic)
In his aerie, at high elevation,
Nests the eagle, the bird of our nation.
This word, one should mention,
Can mean by extension
"A strong and high fortification."
 
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PS:
Virge, I agree with you: Tim is the best.
All I can hope is to put him to test.
As a tribute to you, my antipodean friend,
I wrote you a verse which I hope won't offend.
    Our Project
    If Virge is in on it [He should be!],
    But the project's ridiculous [Could be!],
    Then upon minor urging
    We'd say that it's "Virge-in
    On the ridiculous". [Would we? Wink]
 
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aerobics (T. Alborn)

If studying causes you pain,
Try oxygenating your brain.
Aerobics each day
All ills will allay,
But the music might drive you insane.
 
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There's no chance of petulant pique
When you offer your charming chic cheek.
When versin' on "Virge-in"
You ain't no verse virgin:
I see you've been hic et ubique.


FYI Here's a list of those with 10 or more limericks contributed or co-authored.
165 36.7% Chris J. Strolin
65 14.4% Tim Alborn
38 8.4% BobHale
18 4.0% Richard English
16 3.6% Hic et ubique
14 3.1% Virge
13 2.9% Kalleh
13 2.9% murlach
12 2.7% Eric L. Andersen
11 2.4% evinrude
10 2.2% jerry thomas

Now I'd better get back to writing some dictionary limericks.
 
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Wow, there's no place money for fourth - I'd better get cracking!


Richard English
 
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The word "act" has a lot of meanings. I've covered some of them.

An act can be something you do,
A pretense or behaviour untrue,
Or a part of a play,
Opera, circus, ballet,
Or variety show or review.

An act is a formal decision
Made by a lawmaking division
Of government. Its reading
Is fruitful for pleading
Despite its pedantic precision.

An act of God's like an excuse
For disasters we deem too abstruse
To predict. But we're shy
To confront the Big Guy
'Cause we know He'll just blame it on Zeus.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Virge,
 
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virge,

sorry for the mispost; especially since it was such a crappy limerick. Here's a slightly better version:

abuccinate (T. Alborn)

Perhaps I can help to elucidate
What it means for a man to abuccinate.
First a loud trumpet blast,
Then he shouts with bombast.
(There are quieter ways to communicate.)
 
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Abnormal

Abnormal means deviant or strange
Or out of the usual range
Such as leaves that are blue
Or a mauve Cockatoo
Or a cabbie who has the right change.


Richard English
 
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Abrade

Abrade means to wear off by rubbing
Or maybe by excessive scrubbing
At times this is fine
For creating a shine
Out of place though, you're in for a drubbing.


Richard English
 
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Absolve

Absolve is to set free from blame
To acquit (which is nearly the same)
One falsely accused
Or similarly ill-used
When there's no actual truth in the claim


Richard English
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Tim Alborn:
A thermodynamically static
Container is _adiabatic_.
Its walls are impassable;
Heat's not amassable.
The same can't be said for my attic.

When the final site is up and running, I would like the initial welcoming page to include the proviso that all contributors will agree that they will be open to the aspect of constructive critique and workshopping BUT that if only the most minor of changes are needed that the contributor gives permission for them to be made by the OEDILF staff without the usual give-and-take communication that would make up a more substantial workshopping effort.

I bring up this point here since it seems to me that this piece is near perfect and in need of only the slightest tweaking. For lines 3 & 4, I would go with:

Its walls are impassable
So heat's not amassable.

making the stress of both . X . . X . .
and, at the same time, doing away with the semi-colon. I'm not anti-semi-colon per se but like to avoid them if other punctuation or sentence structure will suffice.

Comments?
 
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Let me catch up on some editing. I'm mildly ecstatic regarding the quantity and, far more important, the quality of the stuff we're seeing!


jo - "Ad infinitum" is a peach and while "adjure / abjure" doesn't completely clear up the confusion between the two words, it certainly helps. And, yes, absolutely no problem with the "adjure / be sure / aver" rhyme and, while I'm thinking of it, I owe you an apology regarding our previous "tedious / abstemious" discussion. Your rhyme was not as off as I had thought since I was mispronouncing "abstemious" with a short E (as one would assume from its appearance) and not the same long E as in "tedious" which would make this a case of assonance. Still not a perfect rhyme since the consonants differ but a near rhyme and, as such, perfectly acceptable. I apologize for the error.


Virge - I guess we'll wait for rbarenblat to decide between our renderings of his "abubble" piece. One minor glitch with your last line is that "admiring," correctly pronounced with 3 syllables, is often mispronounced with 4 since this seems like the logical result of adding the one-syllable "-ing" to the 3-syllable "admire."


Wordnerd - Your "ahimsa" piece? My daughter loves you! On the rare occasions she finds ants in her kitchen (She's a meticulous housekeeper) she'll carefully corral them and then release them back into the wild. Can I assume that "ahims" is pronounced with the stress on the 2nd syllable? And with "invective," I have to ask Why did you jump way ahead to the I's? It's a fine piece (I'd close it with an exclamation mark; you're angry after all) but I do very much want to keep this project on track and in order alphabetically.


E.L.A. - Great stuff on "abirritant," "abject," and "adjudicate" and, yes, we're capitalizing the first word of each line as is the case with pretty much 99% of the limericks I've ever seen. Just a case of standardization, you see. (A sidenote: In looking up "attrition" to make sure I understood the word correctly in your "abject" piece, I discovered that one definition for this word is "repentance for sin motivated by fear of punishment rather than love of God." Interesting! We'll have to keep that in mind when we get up to the "at-" words.)


T.A. - I see by the list that you're now our second-most prolific writer and, as always, the quality of all your most recent contributions remains high. I especially liked "Aeolian harp" for reasons you could find by searching for that term on the Wordcraft site overall. I forget what the thread was called but it had to do with a contest and one of my many English language fetishes.


Hic - Don't sweat the occasion duplication. It only serves to make the OEDILF stronger overall. Great definition there on "aegrotat" and the discussion about metaphors was continued in the Questions & Answers About Words forum elsewhere. With "aedes / anopheles" I'd say the first 5 lines provide a fine definition for "aedes" but I think you should give "anopheles" its own limerick. The sixth line of a limerick is like the 18th word of a haiku. Perfect definition on "aerie."

Also, writing your limericks in pairs may be difficult to put into the OEDILF. If a second limerick continues the thought of a first, notes following each can direct the reader's attention to the pairing but the standard for recording all verses will of course have to be alphabetical.

With "aegir / bore / aborrent" I'd say the first verse defines "aegir" very well but the second we'll save for "bore" since it hardly describes "aborrent" at all. For "aerobatics" see discussion on the semi-colon in the Q & A forum.

Virge - Great definitions for "act" (two in one limerick in one case) and "act of God" is another winner. Like you, I also need to get my butt back to writing these things instead of just working with them in other ways. Thanks again for all your efforts website-wise and otherwise.


R.E. - Ba-BOOM!! After a short absence, R.E. steps up to the plate (Sorry for the sports metaphor, R.E.; I assure you it's favorable.) and slams the first pitch well over the centerfield wall with "abnormal"! The slightest glitch of the 3-syllable "deviant" being compressed into the 2-syllable "dee-vyant" is perfectly acceptable especially with a piece which defines its word so well and with such a strong last line. Very well done, R.E.! "Abrade" and "absolve" also work well despite having to slightly mispronunce "excessive" with the stress on the 1st syllable to make the meter work. You may be in fourth place, as you say, but it's an extremely strong fourth.


Thanks again one and all!
 
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Apologies that I posted accommodation(s) in the wrong thread. I won't change it now.


Richard English
 
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I think eventually we should have a section of the OEDILF for limericks which don't specifically define a word. Hic's "Virge in on the ridiculous" piece would be a prime example.

Excellent piece, Hic, but isn't the last line short a few syllables? May I suggest an edit (meaning not a co-authorship) such as:
quote:
Originally posted by Hic et ubique:
If Virge is _in on it_ [He should be!],
But the project's ridiculous [Could be!],
Then upon minor urging
We'd say that it's "Virge-in
On the ridiculous". [But then again would we? Wink]
 
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Re: adding the spare preposition, removing the maligned semicolon: fine by me. It will make Chris's job much easier, certainly, if this sort of thing can go straight onto the "finished" page.
 
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If in autumn, one evening, by gosh,
You should find yourself wanting a nosh:
Baked with butter and spice
There is nothing so nice
As a seasonal-fresh acorn squash!
 
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I'm not thrilled with the rhyme in line 2, so any suggestions are welcome!

To usurp royal power’s to poach,
In a manner surpassingly gauche,
The crown, riches, and wine
That aren’t rightfully thine
(Another term, natch, is accroach.)
 
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Two attempts on the same word, again. The first might be too ribald...

If a gentleman’s trigger’s acock
On an evening of drinking and talk
He’d best focus on his goal
Lest he lose his control
Which his ladyfriends surely would mock!

In perceiving a trigger acock
Any pigeon might righteously squawk
Both in warning and fear
Of the bullet coming near
And in hopes that the rifle will lock.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by rbarenblat:
I'm not thrilled with the rhyme in line 2, so any suggestions are welcome!

To usurp royal power’s to poach,
In a manner surpassingly gauche,
The crown, riches, and wine
That aren’t rightfully thine
(Another term, natch, is _accroach_.)

Maybe:

To usurp royal power's to poach
A king's throne and his crown and his coach,
His riches and wine,
Things not rightfully mine,
The term for which, natch, is "accroach."

If you like it, call it a "heavy edit." There's not enough new stuff there of mine to consider co-authorship status.

In line 4 I don't know why I like "mine" over "thine" unless it's because I myself end up on the throne. As some of the other older Wordcrafters might tell you, when it comes to royalty and such, I have a bit of an ermine fetish.

"Acorn squash" sounds great (I'm from New England; they have acorn squash ice cream up there!) with that last line sounding especially sharp.

Ref "acock," ribald is fine but smutty is not and this piece (the first one) clearly makes the grade. For the sake of trimming an extra syllable, I might go with "fix on his goal" rather than "focus on his goal" and, likewise with the second piece, I might opt for "bullet" over "shot."

What did you decide about your NASA abubble piece? (see above)
 
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CJ says, "Hic, but isn't the last line short a few syllables?"
Nope. It has just as many (8) as the last line of your own "advance" limerick here.

CJ says, "May I suggest an edit?"
No, thank you; I’m here to enjoy writing and reading limericks, not critiques. Take a look here, at the 2nd and 4th bullet-points. Much appreciated.
 
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AEROGRAM

There once was a fellow named Sam
Who proposed via short aerogram.
Said his girl, "That's quite nice
But if you want rice,
You'll bend knee here by me, not by *ham.


*ham radio to send a radiogram

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AERONOMY

Aeronomy goes up in the air
To study the chemistry there.
And phenomena physical
For those who are quizzical.
As for me, I am sure I don't care.
 
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abkari

In India the excise, or duty
On liquor and similar booty
Is known as abkari,
So pay, or be sorry
In prison they'll throw your patootie!
 
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aequorin (T. Alborn)

A protein called aequorin, which is
Extracted from some jellyfishes,
Turns blue upon contact
With calcium. This fact
Biologists deem quite propitious.
 
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I can't believe nobody's done "accountant" yet.

accountant (T. Alborn)

Accountants we trust as reliable;
Hence for their mistakes they're held liable.
So when they're in error,
Their hearts cringe in terror:
In sum, they become certifiable.
 
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CJ says, "Hic, but isn't the last line short a few syllables?"
Nope. It has just as many (8) as the last line of your own "advance" limerick here.

CJ says, "May I suggest an edit?"
No, thank you; I’m here to enjoy writing and reading limericks, not critiques. Take a look here, at the 2nd and 4th bullet-points. Much appreciated.


I was a novice professor, doing some consultation with the Lung Association as the chair of their research committee. We had asked a very renowned professor to speak on her research. Our protocol was to have the researchers present, followed by a critique. She refused the critique. I remember thinking that she was just plain arrogant. We begged her...she wouldn't budge. We finally allowed her to present with no critique. I could never understand her position.....until now.

She was stellar. Tops in her field. She went on to become the Provost of a very prestigious university. She wasn't arrogant. She knew that our research critics, generally novice faculty members, just weren't prepared to critic her complex and high-level research.

That, I believe, is the case with Hic. Having posted here for a long time with Hic, I have found Hic's limericks the absolute best of the best.

The limericks are great. I think we need to rethink the critiques. They are fine for a site dedicated to this project, and I hear that will be up soon. Until then though, let's just post limericks. A few comments here and there are of course fine. But, I would hate to turn this board into a "limerick workshop." Thanks!
 
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acetate / acetic acid

"Making acid acetic dissociate
To its conjugate base, known as acetate,
Can be done with hydroxide,"
So the tutor-postdoc sighed
And yawned, "Pay attention. I'll demonstrate."

This was a struggle. I'm still not happy with the word inversion on acetic acid. I didn't even want to include acetic acid (since it's already been done). When I tried to define acetate, the acetic acid appeared as a byproduct.

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ABTA

Now ABTA's the travel trade body
(Whose principles all should embody)
By good regulations
It saves Britons' vacations
From shysters who sell what is shoddy.

Note. ABTA (or Abta) is now considered a word in the UK and appears in the later editions of the OED.


Richard English
 
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Quote "...The slightest glitch of the 3-syllable "deviant" being compressed into the 2-syllable "dee-vyant" ..."

This is the UK/US pronunciation thing again. In the UK deviant is usually pronounced with just two syllables - just as you have suggested.

It would probably be OK to pronounce it with three but I suspect most UK English speakers wouldn't bother too much either way.


Richard English
 
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Abut

Of a building it's "lean on" or "touch"
With projection, or point, or some such.
But if countries abut
It mean different but
Touching (like the Belgians and Dutch)


Richard English
 
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Aboard

Aboard means to be on a train
Or a ship and in these days a 'plane
And the cry "all aboard"
Should not be ignored
Else it's home where you'll surely remain.


Richard English
 
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Aboral

A function or thing that is oral
Relates to the mouth (unlike aural)
Which means "of the ear"
or something you hear
But far from the mouth that's aboral.


Richard English
 
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achalasia (T. Alborn)

If your food-pipe is feeling constricted,
And you wonder with what you're afflicted,
It's time to face facts:
Tell your sphincter "relax!"
Achalasia's how doctors depict it.
 
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OK, this will be my last non-limerick post on this thread.

First off, I didn't realize until Hic pointed it out to me that we weren't supposed to be critiquing limericks in this thread. One of the primary aspects of the OEDILF Project deals with critiquing and workshopping (and, moreover, the fun involved with doing so) but in setting up the Wordcraft site two years ago, this was not something that was included in the overall game plan. As site administrator, Wordcrafter sets the rules and all of us are obliged to follow them.

Regarding the rule against critiquing, however, as unlikely as it may sound I have to plead ignorance. There were three Wordcrafter posts on July 11th in the "Message to Posters" thread and I know I didn't see the third one or I would have responded to it. I recall reading the first one (and wondering, frankly, why it was there; I certainly hadn't requested it) but possibly because the others had the same date, I missed some of the information. I regret this since I have apparently been giving the impression that I was ignoring Wordcrafter's rules and this wasn't the case.

In my defense, I had been lead to believe that I was in charge of the OEDILF forum. I would never in a million years try to make decisions for the Wordcraft site - Why would I? It's not my site! - but Wordcrafter has taken it upon himself to make decisions about the OEDILF. Is this fair? Yes, actually, it is. The OEDILF forum is part of the Wordcraft site overall and, bottom line, he is the head of the Wordcraft site.

I have appreciated all the assistance I've received over the past couple of months with this project and have expressed this appreciation in a dozen different ways. I had originally turned down the Sun-Times request for a story since our new website was not yet up but changed my mind when it was pointed out that this would be an excellent bit of publicity for the Wordcraft site. Many of this site's recent avalanche of new posters have stuck to just the OEDILF without venturing into the rest of the board but even they would tell you that I have repeatedly invited them to explore other forums.

A few of you have contacted me to express confusion as to what is going on and I hope this clarifies things. All I can say is hang in there and give the new site a look when it comes up which, by the way, shouldn't be too much longer. When it is up, I intend to continue posting here since, as I have always stated, this is an excellent forum for the exchange of ideas and opinions and just all-around talk about the English language.


Well, that's about it. One last time, I do sincerely apologize for any heartburn I've caused. It certainly wasn't intentional.

CJS
 
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No problem, Chris. The inherent difficulty is that your site is focused on a particular goal (a publishable limerick dictionary), while I have to make sure that this site remains consistent with its broader function.

You're completely right to clarify possible confusion. To keep the clarity handy, rather than deep in a thread, I'm closing this thread but starting another one for the same use, with a note on top.

One thing on which I've been woefully remiss. Chris, a thousand thank-you's for the influx of wonderful people you've brought, and beyond that for your fascinating postings for almost two years.

loop for i=1 to 1000: print THANK YOU!: end loop Big Grin
 
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Hello all, I just read about this yesterday, and I thought I would try my hand at some limericks. I decided to start with an easy one that was mentioned as not being done yet in another thread.

Acid:

With a PH of seven of less
Chemists like acid the best
The opposite of base
don't spill it on your face
Or else you'll be left quite a mess
 
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Thread closed, and restarted as a new thread. Nice writing, all!
 
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Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  The OEDILF (closed)    (closed; see new thread) Let's continue with the limericks now...

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