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American Dialects

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February 25, 2012, 07:10
Caterwauller
American Dialects
Has anyone posted this map of American dialects before? I find it interesting.


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
February 25, 2012, 07:50
zmježd
I hadn't seen it before. Great find!


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
February 25, 2012, 08:24
Proofreader
Many years ago BTV (Before Television), there was a radio show featuring a man who would give audience members a short speech to speak. Based on their pronunciation of the words, he could pretty well nail down both where they lived and where they had come from originally. I don't think he could do that stunt easily today since many accents are less pronounced than they were when I was youngerl, due to the influence of mass communication (supposedly).


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
February 25, 2012, 17:48
Geoff
Around here you can spot the folks from Kentucky, since they have a very distinctive Southern accent and different speech patterns than the Northerners.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
February 26, 2012, 15:41
bethree5
I forget where you live, Geoff? I lived in Michigan for a few yrs in the '70's. The Michigander accent was similar to Chicago's (with a few distinctive locutions-- which I get now from this dialect map-- North Midland!). There were lots of Ky people who'd been there more than a generation, having come up for auto work. Their accent really made for a contrast. Unlike mine, tho I'd come from further away. This article/map clarifies all that. Thanks, cw!
February 26, 2012, 20:46
Kalleh
We in "Chicago Urban" do not call any sweet roll a "doughnut." Very strange comment.
August 27, 2012, 22:44
WhiskeyRiver
Personally,I think we in the US dont really speak true English anymore.We speak American.We dont say 'boot' or 'bonnet',..nor do we say 'lorre'. We dont say'she had to go to Hospital".
We say 'trunk','hood',truck,and that she had to go to the Hospital. There are many other differences between the English and the American languages.Lol. It's fun to pick out the differences too. Just for fun though.
Hey,..know what I just found out(that makes me feel like a genuine idiot)? That our numerical characters arent Latin in original,but Arabic.Floored me.I had no clue.


The English had hit upon a splendid joke. They intended to catch me or to bring me down.
(Manfred von Richthofen-The Red Baron)
August 27, 2012, 23:28
Richard English
quote:
Personally,I think we in the US dont really speak true English anymore.We speak American.We dont say 'boot' or 'bonnet',..nor do we say 'lorre'.

Nor do we in the UK - unless we are speaking of Peter Lorre, that US film actor.

Did you perchance mean "lorry" - another name for a truck?Wink


Richard English
August 28, 2012, 01:01
neveu
quote:
We dont say 'boot' or 'bonnet'

Canadian French, which began diverging from continental French in the 17th or 18th century, similarly has different words for parts of an automobile. They are the American names pronounced with a French accent.
August 28, 2012, 05:30
Proofreader
I once worked with a guy (a native American) who persisted in using UK terms for his car (bnnet, boot, spannr). Of course he also rebuilt his engine in his living room and once shot out a glass sliding door trying to kill a yowling cat outside, but I don't know if there's any connection.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
August 29, 2012, 21:00
Kalleh
quote:
We speak American.
Unless of course you are z, and then you say, "in hospital" and "in university." Wink

I find the east coast closer to English-English than American English, at least according to accent.