Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  The Vocabulary Forum    Local colloquialisms
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Local colloquialisms Login/Join
 
Junior Member
posted
I have previously only belonged to one Word forum. Colloquialism or slang was looked upon with disdain and they had rules about it that were difficult for me to understand. And frankly given the trouble those rules caused, it was obvious that others didn't get them either. hehe, and did you notice what I just said? 'didn't get them'. Well OK, I've set the scene.

Here's the thing... Aussies would be lost without slang. Especially this rather 'ocker' Aussie. I don't know how we'd communicate without colloquialisms.

So, given I'm new to this forum, I need to understand where I stand. Is it acceptable in this forum to discuss colloquialisms? And if so, is there some special place I'm supposed to go? Polite answers only accepted...
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Blue Mountains, AustraliaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I am an administrator here, and I can say, without hesitation, that it's fine to discuss colloquialisms. There is no special place for it.

When you registered, you saw that our terms of service ask that any poster be polite in his or her posts, and that we respect our fellow posters. But that's a given.

We have a great community here, and we are very excited to have an Aussie!
 
Posts: 23304 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
quote:
Is it acceptable in this forum to discuss colloquialisms?
AbsoFriggn'Lutely fine, Peta. No wuckers Wink.

We tend to use this particular forum for the words of the day, and bring other word-questions and the like to the "Questions and Answers" section. But you'll find this place is pretty much free of hard and fast rules, other than the rules of politeness.

Welcome aboard, sheila. Where are the Blue Mountains? Inland from Sydney?
 
Posts: 2603 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Who is sheila
 
Posts: 657Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
Who is sheila

It's an Aussie term for 'woman'. YCLIU.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5085 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
I stand to be corrected here, but I don't think "sheila" is used as a term of address in Oz, any more than you'd say "Welcome aboard, woman". Smile


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10930 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Richard English
posted Hide Post
quote:
Here's the thing... Aussies would be lost without slang. Especially this rather 'ocker' Aussie. I don't know how we'd communicate without colloquialisms.

I feel sure that all languages use slang and colloquialisms; we tend to be sparing in their use on this site simply to help avoid misunderstandings. However, nobody gets upset if a colloquialism is used - although some may seek clarification.


Richard English
 
Posts: 8037 | Location: Partridge Green, West Sussex, UKReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
In fact, slang and colloquialisms often give rise to some of the most interesting discussions on this site. Often the British posters here will use a particular word or phrase without knowing that it's not in common use in the US. Subsequent explanations can lead to some fascinating digressions.

It doesn't seem to work the other way round very often, probably because the ubiquity of US books, films, and TV mean that we are exposed to US slang so even if we don't use a word or phrase ourselves we understand it.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10930 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  The Vocabulary Forum    Local colloquialisms

Copyright © 2002-12