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Ah, Jane Austen! It was tremendous fun preparing this theme of words from her Emma, Pride and Prejudice, and Sense and Sensibility, and was a true embarrassment of riches, for there were enough fine words for three themes. So we can look forward to revisiting this theme twice in the near future.

verdure – lush green vegetation
    It was a sweet view--sweet to the eye and the mind. English verdure, English culture, English comfort, seen under a sun bright, without being oppressive.
    – Jane Austin, Emma, ch. 6
 
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Austen uses today's word in a sense other than the familiar meaning.

collation – a light, informal meal (also, the act of collating)
    In the country, an unpremeditated dance was very allowable; but in London, where the reputation of elegance was more important and less easily attained, it was risking too much for the gratification of a few girls, to have it known that Lady Middleton had given a small dance of eight or nine couple, with two violins, and a mere side-board collation.
    - Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, ch. 27
 
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repine – 1. to feel or express discontent 2. to long for something

from Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, chapters 24 and 41:
    "Oh, that my dear mother had more command over herself! She can have no idea of the pain she gives me by her continual reflections on him. But I will not repine. It cannot last long. He will be forgot, and we shall all be as we were before.

    Wholly inattentive to her sister's feelings, Lydia flew about the house in restless ecstasy, calling for everyone's congratulations, and laughing and talking with more violence than ever; whilst the luckless Kitty continued in the parlour repine at her fate in terms as unreasonable as her accent was peevish.
 
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Time to catch up a bit on words-of-the-day. My apologies.

WC

raillery – good-humored banter or teasing repartee; jesting language.

moiety – one of two roughly-equal parts; a half. Typically use of a deceased's estate.

What a fine description of Mrs. Jennings here!
    Mrs. Jennings was a good-humoured, merry, fat, elderly woman, who talked a great deal, seemed very happy, and rather vulgar. She was full of jokes and laughter, and before dinner was over had said many witty things on the subject of lovers and husbands; hoped they had not left their hearts behind them in Sussex, and pretended to see them blush whether they did or not. Marianne was vexed at it for her sister's sake, and turned her eyes towards Elinor to see how she bore these attacks, with an earnestness which gave Elinor far more pain than could arise from such common-place raillery as Mrs. Jennings's.

    Their mother had nothing, and their father only seven thousand pounds in his own disposal; for the remaining moiety of his first wife's fortune was also secured to her child, and he had only a life-interest in it.
    – Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility, ch. 7 and 1
 
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outré – conspicuously unconventional, eccentric, or bizarre
[pronounce the vowel sounds and accent as in 'today']

Ms. Austen uses a different spelling in Mr. Frank Churchill's catty description.
    "I believe I have been very rude; but really Miss Fairfax has done her hair in so odd a way–so very odd a way–that I cannot keep my eyes from her. I never saw any thing so outrée!– Those curls!– This must be a fancy of her own. I see nobody else looking like her!– I must go and ask her whether it is an Irish fashion. Shall I?– Yes, I will–I declare I will–and you shall see how she takes it;– whether she colours."
    – Jane Austen, Emma, ch. 8
 
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obtrude(of a thought or a person: ) to thrust itself (or himself), unwelcome, upon a person's company or attention.
    She [Queen Elizabeth] has an exceptional memory and her constitutional right to advise, to be consulted and to warn is one of which Commonwealth leaders may avail themselves or not as they wish. Her personal feelings on any question are, as she might say, neither here nor there. They are never allowed to obtrude.
    – Allan Ramsay, British diplomacy in the Queen's reign: 1952-2002, Contemporary Review, August, 2002

    "How you can bear such recollections, is astonishing to me!– They will sometimes obtrude– but how you can court them!"
    – Jane Austen, Emma, ch. 54

    All connection between us seemed now dissolved. I thought too ill of him to invite him to Pemberley, or admit his society in town. ... How he lived I know not. But last summer he was again most painfully obtruded on my notice.

    ... she began, as they met, to admire the beauty of the place; ... when some unlucky recollections obtruded, and she fancied that praise of Pemberley from her might be mischievously construed. Her colour changed, and she said no more.
    – Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, ch. 35 and 43
Note: the definition here is merely one that I have composed. The dictionaries seem to me incorrect in that they speak only of an obtruding person, but not the obtruding thought – which is the more frequent usage. Also, many dictionaries give a further meaning ("to thrust out; to push out.") for which I can find no example in use. It would be odd if a word meaning "to thrust into (one's attention)" would also mean "to thrust out".]

Webster's Unabridged distinguishes obtrude from intrude: "To intrude is to thrust one's self into a place, society, etc., without right, or uninvited; to obtrude is to force one's self, remarks, opinions, etc., into society or upon persons with whom one has no such intimacy as to justify such boldness."

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