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Last week we looked at words from Spanish describing land-formations. Here are some more-general words English has acquired form Spanish.

camarilla – a body of secret intriguers
[Spanish, literally, 'small room']

Although many dictionaries define the term as a body of scheming advisors, it is not limited to 'advisors' (see second quotation).
    Finally, in order to ensure the stability of his regime and of the presidential succession, by 1940 Cardenas reached an understanding with the official camarilla that controlled Yucatecan machine politics.
    – Paul K. Eiss, Journal of Social History, Summer, 2003

    The shift of power from parliament to the army and the court camarilla was completed in Yugoslavia, whose parliament functioned either as a mere talking shop or not at all.
    – Bosnian Institute News, UK, May 31, 2006
 
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Today's word traces back to Latin salvus safe; salvare make safe (as in 'salvage').

A king's food was pre-tasted to assure it was 'safe' – not poisoned – and thus 'saving' the king. After this testing (pregustation) the food was presented to the king on a special, identifying tray. In Spanish the pre-tasting, and the tray itself, were named salva from the Latin. When the word passed into English (perhaps through French), an -er ending was attached, akin to platter.

salver – a tray, usually silver, for formal serving of food or drink
    Nat, Tommy, and Demi left the room, and speedily returned with a little red morocco box set forth in state on Mrs. Jo's best silver salver.
    – Louisa May Alcott, Little Men

    It's fitting that Venus Williams keeps winning the gilded, silver salver that has been awarded to the ladies' singles champ at Wimbledon since 1886. Like Williams, the Venus Rosewater Dish is named for a goddess.
    – Philadelphia Inquirer, May 28, 2006
Bonus word:
morocco
– fine flexible leather made (originally in Morocco) from goatskins tanned with sumac
 
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vaquero – a cowboy; a cattle-driver [esp. used in Texas] [from Spanish vaca cow]
buckaroo – a cowboy; a cattle-driver [an Anglicized version of vaquero, from California]

The second quote uses buckaroo as a verb, a usage I have not found in the dictionaries.
    Rock-cowboys rode the range in Spanish Mexico. They called themselves vaqueros, or cowherders, from vaca, the Spanish word for cow.
    – Russell Freedman, In the Days of the Vaqueros: America's First True Cowboys

    He left home at age 15 to buckaroo for a number of large open range outfits in Nevada and southern Idaho.
    – obituary for Wayne Hage, Eldrige (Iowa) North Scott Press, June 14, 2006

    Now hold on, partner. I'm not the young buckaroo that I once was, but I have been on MySpace.
    – Motley Fool, May 26, 2006

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The dictionaries define today's word as "inspiration, magic, fire" (OED) or as "power to attract by personal magnetism and charm" (AHD; MW). I believe these definitions are too broad (the latter would apply to Bill Clinton). Rather, the term is for a performer.

duende – a performer's fiery intensity that sweeps away the audience
[think of a powerful flamenco dancer] [Sp. dialect, from Sp. for 'ghost; goblin]
    His own dancing was polished but lacking in what Spaniards call duende – the demoniacal intensity which sweeps audiences off their feet.
    – Daily Telegraph, Mar. 31, 1970 (credit OED)

    It was genuine flamenco too, none of your tourists' stuff. But there was no duende. The majority of our group were far too caught up in their own class, culture and language to appreciate the efforts of a couple of stamping gypsies, and we just sat there like a row of gargoyles. Most of us didn't even clap.
    – Jeremy Clarke, The Spectator, June 10, 2000
 
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vamooseinformal: to depart suddenly and hurriedly
[from Spanish vamos let's go]
    Henry walks around to the side of the car and opens the door. "Clare, let's vamoose. This is pointless."
    – Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife
 
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sympatico – likeable; congenial 2. of like mind or temperament; compatible
[Spanish simpático or Italian simpatico]

Note that this word can describe either a person, or a relationship between people. The latter sense implies, I would think, a close mental harmony; see last two quotes.
    Prosecutor Paolo Ferri called Hecht, "smart and simpatico," but also said the damage he has done to Italy's cultural heritage is immense. – UPI, June 21, 2006

    He liked being put to work, feeling useful, and my grandmother liked to use him. They were a simpatico team. – Alice Sebold, The Lovely Bones: A Novel

    It was like an ultimate simpatico, being two people at once: not telepathy, but mutual awareness. – Frank Herbert, Dune
 
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quinella – a bet where the bettor must name the top two finishers
perfecta – a bet where the bettor must name the top two finishers, in order (also called exacta)
trifecta – a bet where the bettor must name the top three finishers, in order
[Am. Spanish quiniela. Spanish, a 'perfect' or 'exact' quinella.]

Trifecta is much more interesting when used figuratively, as in our example quote. It was claimed that a candidate will do well by adopting the issue-positions of the winner of a recent election.
    But all that election really proved is that a GOP [representative] could keep a seat in a 60% Republican district so long as he outspent an opponent who committted [a] final-week gaffe. Replicate that trifecta around the country …, and Republicans wouldn't need to campaign.
    – Wall Street Journal, June 23, 2006
 
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