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Monk words

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July 10, 2007, 18:41
wordcrafter
Monk words
Last week we had religion-words. This week, just for grins, we'll look at a subset of religion-words: those that somehow involve monks. Starting with the obvious one.

monkish – inclined to disciplinary self-denial
July 11, 2007, 16:35
wordcrafter
Today's familiar word illustrates how a word can develop a sense far from its original meaning.

A certain order of friars, who wore a cloak with a pointed capuche, or hood, was named after the Italian word of 'hood' (cappuccio,). English using the French version of that name, calls them the Capuchin friars.

Whoever named this order could not have foreseen the friars' name would become a monkey! The capuchin monkey was so named because it looks somewhat as if it were wearing the hood of a friar's habit.

Nor could he have imagined that the friars would become a drink, so named because it has the light-brown color of the Capuchin friars' habit. (Again, the habit. The order's name seems to be 'habit-forming'. [groan]) The drink's name is the Italian name for that order of friars, tracing back to the original 'hood'.

cappuccino – coffee with milk; white coffee, esp. as served in espresso coffee-bars, topped with white foam
July 12, 2007, 14:59
wordcrafter
lubber – a big, clumsy, stupid fellow; esp. a lazy one; a lout
(abbey-lubber was once a common term of reproach for a lazy monk.)
July 13, 2007, 02:53
BobHale
I'm wondering how that reconciles with landlubber, a poor or inexperienced sailor.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.

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July 13, 2007, 13:55
wordcrafter
banoffi pie – a flan filled with bananas, toffee, and cream
[from banana + coffee/toffee]

Why is this a monk word? Because it was invented, in 1972, at the Hungry Monk restaurant in Jevington, Sussex. Its creator, Ian Dowding, tells the story here. "The owner of this restaurant … joined up some of the syllables and came up with 'banoffi'. We thought it was incredibly silly."Recipe here. Does it look good to you? I solicit your feedback.
July 14, 2007, 01:24
Richard English
quote:
Recipe here. Does it look good to you? I solicit your feedback.

Are you saying it's not known in the USA? It's pretty common here in West Sussex - even though it was invented all that way away in East SussexWink


Richard English
July 14, 2007, 12:21
wordcrafter
chartreuse – a pale yellowish apple-green color
[from a liqueur (also named chartreuse), of this color, made by the monks of La Grande-Chartreuse]
July 14, 2007, 12:36
BobHale
The recipe link doesn't work, but this one might.

Recipe

I know it doesn't sound great but believe me it is. It's one of my favourite desserts.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.

My current blog.
Photographs to accompany Anyone Can DO It available from www.lulu.com
My photoblog The World Through A lens
July 14, 2007, 13:26
jerry thomas
A decade or two ago I labelled myself Expert-Amateur Pastry Chef.

Expert because I'm quite good at it (he said, modestly) and Amateur because I do it for love, not for money.

The recipe for banoffi pie caught my eye. I read it carefully and decided to try it some time in the near future, so it's now on my List of Things To Do; but the part about boiling unopened cans of condensed milk startled me. I would expect the cans to explode.

I read the recipe again and thought the filling sounded a lot like Dulce de Leche, a very popular sauce in Argentina. So I sought a recipe ...... and found one. Notice that the recipe writer recommends punching holes in the cans' tops before boiling. Good idea !!

Dulce de Leche ... ... Read more ...
July 14, 2007, 13:52
neveu
quote:
but the part about boiling unopened cans of condensed milk startled me. I would expect the cans to explode

Yes, that sounds like a Very Bad Idea.
July 15, 2007, 12:36
wordcrafter
Many quotes today, for we have two words, each probably from the surname Mulligan. The surname is a double diminutive of Gaelic/Old-Irish mael 'bald', and so means "the little bald (or shaven) one," probably referring to a monk. Hence our two ‘mulligan’ words are indirectly monk-words.

mulligan – a second chance to play a golf shot; a "do-over"mulligan stew or mulligan – a stew made with whatever's available (also fig: a mixture, jumble, hotchpotch) [hobo slang]
July 16, 2007, 11:01
wordcrafter
A dervish is a Muslim friar who has taken vows of poverty. One order is called the whirling dervishes, after their ritual of wild, frenzied dancing. The dictionaries give no further meaning for ‘whirling dervish’, but in actual usage the term is also used figuratively, as below.

whirling dervish – one in constant frenzied activity