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Your challenge: to figure out what theme underlies our words of this week.

Parnassus
1. the world of poetry or poets: a rhymester striving to enter Parnassus;
2. a center of poetry or artistic activity: Greenwich Village was once the Parnassus of the U.S.
3. a collection of poems or of elegant literature
 
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My graduate school was on Parnassus Avenue in San Francisco....no, I am sure you're not referring to nursing graduate schools! Wink
 
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uranic - of the heavens; celestial; astronomical

A further definition is "pertaining to uranium," but that is outside of this week's theme. Also outside the theme is this contrast word:

chthonic - of the underworld; of the earth; dwelling in or under the earth
quote:
The goddess sometimes appears with doves, as uranic, at others with snakes, as chthonic.
-- Wikipedia: General features of Aegean civilization
 
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Hmmm. Well, Mount Parnassus, of course, which is Greek, and both uranic and chthonic are Greek words, but that seems a bit tenuous!

Confused
 
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cliometrics - the study of history using economic models and advanced mathematical methods of data processing and analysis

Nobel Committee's announcement of the 1993 the Nobel Prize in Economics, shared by Robert W. Fogel and Douglass C. North:
quote:
Economic historians often consider far reaching problems, the estimation of which demand an integration of economics, sociology, statistics and history. Robert Fogel and Douglass North ... were pioneers in the branch of economic history that has been called the "new economic history", or cliometrics, i. e. research that combines economic theory, quantitative methods, hypothesis testing, counterfactual alternatives and traditional techniques of economic history, to explain economic growth and decline.
 
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Having trouble with the theme? Let's try this one.

terpsichorean - noun a dancer. adj. relating to dancing
quote:
Part of The Citizen's continuing programme to develop the city's dancing skills - keen floorburners will remember our sizzling salsa extravaganza and our foray into Morris dancing - Scottish dancing is the latest port of call in the continuing quest for the ultimate terpsichorean experience.
- Matthew Ford in The Citizen, as quoted elsewhere on-line 12.10.00

Wodehouse's A Damsel in Distress [1937] ... is a rich film, containing beautiful songs and some of the greatest dance footage ever filmed (the "Fun House" sequence won its choreographer an Academy Award®, but there are other terpsichorean gems besides) ...
- Michael Skupin, speaking to a convention of The Wodehouse Society, October 1999

Marvin and Marita, impoverished exponents of the dance, introduce the Clampetts to the art of terpsichorean.
- Plus's TV listing for an episode of The Beverly Hillbillies
 
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Ah! Got it! Good one wordcrafter!
 
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I'd guessed that terpsichorean would do it for you. It is the only word in this week's theme that was known to me before preparing the theme.

euterpean - pertaining to music
quote:
When those we love love music, gift giving can become complicated. Sure, it seems easy enough at first. We can indulge in one of those big glossy boxed sets that always seem to come out around now. Too often, however, the tunester in our hearts has gotten there before us, and in these days of CD burning and Napster, that Euterpean fiend may already have all the rarities we can think of.
--Clea Simon, Boston Globe Magazine, November 26, 2000


And I couldn't resist a quotation where the writer, by showing off, gives us two bonus words:

quote:
we present our semi-regular CD blowout, in which we get to the point and step off, giving you a look at the current and vast cornucopia of Euterpean concinnity, the diapason of, uh... what were we saying?
-- ColoradoDaily.com, April 22, 2000


concinnity - 1. harmony in the arrangement of parts with respect to a whole; 2. studied elegance and facility in style of expression

diapason - a full, rich outpouring of harmonious sound
 
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"If I'd thought about it a little longer I bet I would have been able to figure it out," mused Tom.
 
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Always the smart alec, haberdasher! Razz Wink
 
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So glad you're amused. Notice the title of the thread?

calliopean - piercingly loud: a calliopean voice.
(that is, resembling a calliope in sound)

I like this word, but must admit that I cannot find a decent one-line example of its use. Mostly you'll find it in proper names ("Calliopean Society") or pre-1900 items.
 
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This week's theme has been words from the Muses. In Greek mythology's final development the nine Muses, living on Mount Parnassus (our first word), were Urania, Clio, Terpsichore, Euterpe, Calliope, Thalia (our other words), Melpomene, Polyhymnia, and Erato. You can find a good deal of information about the Muses here, with links to each individual Muse, but I can't vouch for its accuracy.

thalian - pertaining to comedy; comic

Another rarely-used word. Although the Star Wars TV show had an alien race called the Thalians. The writers there must have had a sense of the comic.
 
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I most assuredly believe this particular word should be used more often! Wink Just trips off your tongue, dont' you think?
 
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jheem, muse, this follows up on our chat yesterday.

We mentioned in passing several words that derive frome muse. As I recall, we named museum, amuse and mosiac. Any others come to mind?
 
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