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Picture of Kalleh
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I realized recently that I have never read "Invisible Man" and plan to start it tomorrow. On the cover it says that it's "...one of those rare novels that have changed the shape of American literature." (I thought about using sic, but didn't in deference to the descriptivists here. Wink)

Anyway, I do know that it is a very important piece of literature that I've missed reading. I know there's lots more, but I am wondering what books you've missed reading over the years? Will you read them at some point?
 
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Picture of zmježd
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it's "...one of those rare novels that have changed the shape of American literature."

I don't see why a sic might be needed. if is the phrase "those rare novels" which is being modified by "that have changed the shape of American literature". Or am I missing something?


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Ah well, it was late and I was tired. I thought it should be "has changed," but you have convinced me otherwise.
 
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The Invisible Man changed the shape of American literature? I just don't see it.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Picture of BobHale
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Before Invisible Man all the books were triangular.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
Ah well, it was late and I was tired. I thought it should be "has changed," but you have convinced me otherwise.


Both are fine.
 
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I would think that War of the Worlds was more influential than The Invisible Man.
 
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Picture of arnie
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War of the Worlds certainly changed the face of American radio.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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And the Selenites in The First Men in the Moon seem like the prototype for your standard bug-eyed alien.
 
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Picture of zmježd
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Publishing dates for some of H G Wells novels:

The Time Machine (1895)
The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896),
The Invisible Man (1897)
The War of the Worlds (1898)
The First Men in the Moon (1901)


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Picture of bethree5
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I've been browsing Time's 100 best noves, one of the lists on which Invisible Man appears (also looking at Modern Library & NYT's lists), to answer Kalleh's original question. I've put "Call It Sleep" by Henry Roth and "All the King's Men" by Robert Penn Warren on my to-read list.. and maybe Philip Roth's "American Pastoral"-- tho I don't see how he can do better than "The Plot Against America" (& I usually don't care for him). And MAYBE I'll take another few stabs at "Ulysses" (Joyce)... Where's Mailer on these lists?

Perusing a couple of these lists, I was at first taking umbrage that there weren't more women writers listed. It may be just that I've read every one listed already. (Where is Joyce Carol Oates? )

Yet there is something off about these lists.. a predominantly male voice in the selections: what do you think?
 
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quote:


(Where is Joyce Carol Oates? )


At a boxing match.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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Apparently all the women writers are involved in writing either romance novels or detective stories. Check the book shelves on newsstands.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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hm I need my umbrage again
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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quote:
Yet there is something off about these lists.. a predominantly male voice in the selections: what do you think?
I see your point, bethree. Yet, let's face it, men do have a predominant voice particularly in past literature. I can't believe that the whole woman debate is still taking place today ("She's never worked a day in her life!").
 
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("She's never worked a day in her life!").

I think the speaker misspoke. She meant Ann Romney never had a job outside the household in her life, while the speaker, in addition to being a mother, had a full-time career to support her kids.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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I agree. It just added fuel to the conservative fire.

On the other hand, it certainly is an emotional topic that hasn't calmed down for generations. I remember being a working mom while my kids were in elementary school. One mother and friend was complaining to me about "all these women who work and don't care for their kids." I reminded her that I was one of them. "No you're not," she said. "You are a university professor and have more flexible hours than these 9-5 moms." Geez!
 
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Picture of bethree5
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I see your point, bethree. Yet, let's face it, men do have a predominant voice particularly in past literature. I can't believe that the whole woman debate is still taking place today ("She's never worked a day in her life!").

Well,yuh,past literature but these lists go right up to a few yrs ago. Some issues: if "The Lord of the Rings" (meaning SciFi/Fantasy OK) why not Ursula K LeGuiin "The Left Hand of Darkness"? Why not rub out ASByatt's (female)ponderous academic "Possession" & replace it w/Toni Morrison's "The Bluest Eye", &/or "Sula" &or "Song of Solomon, & "The Color Purple" by Alice Walker?... A comment read at a blog re: the Modern Libe's 100: 'Also a serious omission: Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. (And whom should we delete to make room? Well, I see too much D.H. Lawrence, too much Nabokov, and how did Henry Miller and The Tropic of Cancer sneak in there?)'.. Also missing from that list: Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's "Heat and Dust"... &back to the "Time Best 100": surely the graphic novel "Watchman" could have been deleted in favor of "Member of the Wedding" by Carson McCullers or anything by Eudora Welty (who according to wiki was considered just prior to her death the greatest living American author, appears on neither list).
 
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I just realized......
There's a WAR on Women Writers!


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Picture of arnie
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It should also be mentioned that over the years several female authors have had to resort to a pen name or used their initials to avoid being typecast as "involved in writing either romance novels or detective stories" (George Eliot and JK Rowling are just two examples).


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Oh, yes, Bethree. I was only talking about past literature. I agree that more recently there has been some excellent women's literature. You've named some good ones. And how can we forget JK Rowling?
 
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Picture of Caterwauller
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I think that Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison has had a more profound influence on modern literature than has The Invisible Man by HG Wells, and looking at the All-Time list that B3 posted a link to, that is exactly the book being touted as important (Ellison).

I am also happy to see a children's book, well, when it came out it was classified for teens, on the list: Are You There God, It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume. Excellent book.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Caterwauller,


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Picture of Kalleh
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Ladies, have any of you read "Fifty Shades of Grey?"
 
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I won't fail to miss that one.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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My daughter told me, "Mom, I don't think you should read it!" So cute!
 
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