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Hi. Just wondered what everyone is reading right now? I mostly do audio books because they are easier on my eyes. My most recent books have been:
MWF Seeking BFF
It's about a 27 year-old woman who moves from NY to Chicago and realizes after two years there that she has no new close friends in the Chicago area. She spends the year learning all about making new friends and works on doing that. She includes research on how we make friends and the benefits of friendships.

Einstein
This is way over my head, but still interesting.

End of Your Life Book Club
This is an excellent book. It's about a son and his mother as she goes through treatment for pancreatic cancer. Books have always played an important role in their family. So, it's natural that as they wait for doctor visits and while she gets her chemo treatments that they discuss books. They decide to form a two-person book club where they share and discuss books all through her illness. His mother is/was a truly remarkable woman. This book isn't just about dying, but about how to live.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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I read One Moment, One Morning by Sarah Rayner 2 or 3 months ago, then reread it recently because I liked it so well.

The book chronicles a week in the life of three women. Here's what Amazon says about it:

quote:
The 07.44 am train from Brighton to London: The carriages are packed with commuters. One woman occupies her time observing the people around her. Opposite, a girl applies her make-up. Across the aisle, a husband strokes his wife's hand. Further along, a woman flicks through a glossy magazine. Then, abruptly, everything changes: A man collapses, the train is stopped, an ambulance called. And for three passengers that particular morning, life will never be the same again.
 
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My latest: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...Warmth_of_Other_Suns

I think I'll tackle Goofy's latest myself. It's sometimes handy being married to a librarian! Big Grin
 
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All of your books sound interesting! I should say that mine were non-fiction. Tinman, yours looked like fiction. Was it? I do read fiction, too, not necessarily good fiction! I am going to probably read(actually listen to) something very light next. It's a hilarious short fictional work called Visions of Sugar Plums by Janet Evanovich. I have listened to it more than once. Sometimes, I have more than one book going at a time. Do any of you also do this?


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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Dear Leader:My Escape from North Korea by Jang Jin-Sung
Halfway to Hollywood by Michael Plain

(both autobiographical)

The Black Country by Alex Grecian

(A murder mystery set in 1890)
 
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Sorry, I missed this post. I finished Kristin Hannah's "The Nightingale," and am reading Anthony Doerr's "All the Light We Cannot See." I love WWII historical novels. I've never read Anne Fadiman's "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," so that's up next.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
Sorry, I missed this post. I finished Kristin Hannah's "The Nightingale," and am reading Anthony Doerr's "All the Light We Cannot See." I love WWII historical novels. I've never read Anne Fadiman's "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," so that's up next.


I have been thinking of reading, All the Light We Cannot See . It was one of the books mentioned in The End of Your Life Book Club . I recently finished Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land . It is one of my son's all time favorite books and I had never read it.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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Are you enjoying "All the Light We Cannot See?" I am. My husband loves Heinlein so I am sure he has read your second one.
 
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"All the Light We Cannot See

The electric company's revenge?


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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I just finished "The Less You Know, The Better You Sleep" by David Satter. It's an account of the fall of Russian communism and the rise of the criminal state under Putin. This nonfiction work's title is accurate - don't read it if you're worried about who has his finger on the launch buttons.
 
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I just finished Senator Elizabeth Warren's book, A Fighting Chance and started on a book that my son really liked by Dean Koontz titled, Seize the Night. It actually has another book before it in the series, but my son said he had read the second one first. He actually felt that he enjoyed the first book more by reading it in reverse order. I am not sure how much I am going to like it, as it seems pretty spooky to me at this point.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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The English Heritage Book of Tintagel: Arthur and Archaeology by Charles Thomas and Energy Flash: A Journey Through Rave Music and Dance Culture by Simon Reynolds. (Also, slowly working my way through The Elements of Hittite (English and Hittite Edition) by Theo van den Hout (of Univ of Chicago).)


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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It looks like many of us are into a few books at the same time. I've often wondered if that is wise or not. Does it work for the rest of you?
 
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Kalleh, I was thinking, isn't this just like school? We studied multiple subjects at the same time. I think when it is fiction, often, we can't put a book down. I tend to read a lot of non-fiction and so, I have multiple books going at the same time. Recently, I have been reading (actually, listening to) a book on decluttering, one on a boy who has autism and is a genius (from Indiana, no less), and one on a mine disaster in Chile.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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a book on decluttering,

I started reading one, but it disappeared in the mess.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Originally posted by Proofreader:
quote:
a book on decluttering,

I started reading one, but it disappeared in the mess.


LOL
I am trying to follow this book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japansese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo. She has a more in-depth book on the subject, but there is a waiting list for it. I am working on this though while I wait for the other one to become available. It definitely feels partly more spaceious and messier at the same time as I go through this process.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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My favorite is a good historical fiction, but I do make myself read non-fiction because it seems so much more character building.
 
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Aug vacation reading:Hubby & I put in a couple of notches on our read-Jack-Reacher-books-in-order project; restricted Scandinavian noir to 2 (plus a Faroes Isles setting by a Brit), & started on a Nelson DeMille cop series (1st 2 John Corey's).

This Fall's book club books so far: Re Jane by Patricia Park (millenial Korean-Amer protag in 'Flushing & Seoul 2001), The Sweet Hereafter by Russell Banks (aftermath of tragedy, Adirondacks), & Euphoria by Lily King (imagining Margaret Mead & friends in '30's New Guinea), all short & interesting reads.

Bedside table books for me always include Fr & Sp lit, which help me maintain fluency. Cien Años de Soledad by Gabriel Garcia Márquez is going a lot faster than when I tried it a decade ago. Funny & delightful. I'm sticking to Simenon for the moment in French, regular & detective (Maigret) both set on barge canals in the '30's. I get a kick out of them for similar reasons-- back when I was a recent grad of Fr & Sp lit I found Simenon annoyingly difficult, full of arcane vocab & outdated expressions. It's gratifying that 15 yrs of teaching for-lang to tots in later life has improved my reading ability.

I read several books at once. I think this depends entirely on the person. As long as it's a narrative, I'm able to pick up where I left off. That doesn't work for me with non-fiction, though.

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I just finished The Gratitude Diaries by Janice Kaplan.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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Bill Bryson - The Road To Little Dribbling (It's another travel book about England, similar to Notes From A Small Island)
 
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As always, I am enjoying his writing style and easy going anecdotal prose but questioning some of his "facts".
For example it surely can't be true that across the nation as a whole one in five Americans can't locate America on a map. Can it?
 
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Sadly, it might be true. I don't considered myself a very knowledgeable person, but I am continually amazed at how little some people know about politics (When asked, they can't tell you who Joe Biden is.), history (They can't tell you who we fought in the revolution.), and countless other things. They CAN tell you who the quarterback is for a team and what is happening with the Kardashians, but anything of substance, nope.

ps. Just for the record, I can locate America and many other places, too. Wink


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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https://www.amazon.com/Cultura...-Needs/dp/0394758439

https://www.amazon.com/Closing...rished/dp/1451683200

These are not new books expressing new observations.

http://www.cnsnews.com/comment...dumb-american-youth#. (CNS is a right-wing outfit, but I think the figures are accurate despite my disagreeing with the article's premise)

The MSN site recently had a quiz that supposedly could guess your level of education. According to that quiz I have a doctorate. It's sad that they set the bar so low that a brain-damaged ADD-addled tree-hugging chainsaw mechanic can score so high.

Currently reading "Hitler: Ascent 1889-1939" Comparisons between conditions in Germany then that allowed for Hitler's rise and the USA now are frighteningly similar.

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I am reading "Pregnancy: It's Cause and Cure" by Dr. Vera Condom.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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A long time ago now, when I wrote my book "Anyone Can Do It", my brother proof-read it and declared that I needed to lose a few of the drinking anecdotes as it made it sound as if my entire travels around the Americas had been done in a drunken stupor.
I have now finished Bryson's "The Road To Little Dribbling" and while it hardly gives an impression of excessive alcohol consumption there are enough references to going to the pub that it really ought to be subtitled "The Great British Pub Crawl".

A pleasant read that that made me rather nostalgic for the better qualities of my homeland.
 
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How long have you been away, Bob?


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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I've been living and working in China for five and a half years now.
 
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Are there permanently?
 
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Who can say? Next renewal of the visa is when it gets tricky. Official Chinese policy is that ex-pats can't work past sixty (which I will be by then) but I have had repeated assurances that this is not the case and I have known people work into their eighties so it's possible but over here we just shrug and say "T.I.C." (This Is China) because the rules change so often that nobody ever has a clue what will happen tomorrow.
 
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Should your presence no longer be desired will you become a pensioner in the UK? Could you bring the girlfriend with you?
 
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My UK State pension age is 66.
I would be required to get a UK job for those six extra years.
 
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I would be required to get a UK job for those six extra years.
With your experience that should be easy, right? I imagine it would be harder to bring your girlfriend.
 
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We have talked about this before. Obtaining the documentation from China that I would need to legally allowed to work again as a teacher in the UK would be problematic. I would have to have the Chinese equivalent of what is in Britain now called a Disclosure and Barring Service Check (previously called a Criminal Records Bureau Check). This is a piece of paper that certifies that you have commited no criminal offenses that would prevent you working with children or vulnerable adults. As there is no such standard check in China getting one would be difficult.Getting one AFTER I returned to the UK would be next to impossible. I'm sure there are ways round it but who would go to all that trouble to hire someone past sixty when for much less effort and money they could hire someone younger who has never left the UK?
 
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And of course work as a teacher in the UK is much (MUCH) harder and more stressful than life over here. I'm not sure I would want to do the job there now.
 
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Well, I give you credit. While I hate a lot about the U.S. (particularly the politics), I don't think I could leave for that long. I'd miss it here.
 
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I almost forgot about this thread.

Last weekend and a few days more, I had a very bad case of the flu on top of a few other things. So, with not much to do, I listened to audio books. I actually started one before I became ill. So, I listened to The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, Leaving Time by Jodi Picoult, and Once Upon a Time, There was You by Elizabeth Berg. I was really surprised that I didn't like TTTW a little better, but it was way too long and not very believable. LT was different and perhaps more than you want to learn about elephants in a work of fiction. You could also say it wasn't believable. I didn't catch the twist early and I usually do. I am unsure if that was because I wasn't feeling well and not altogether there or whether it was just written that well. My vote has to go with Berg's book and there were problems with that as well. She does manage to capture some of the mixed feelings one has in relationships. I have read a few books of hers and have liked them.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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As is typical of me I'm reading nonfiction. The latest is "This Is Your Brain on Parasites" by Kathleen McAuliffe. It explores the ways that microbes invade, reside, destroy, or enhance more complex organisms. Call me weird, but I find it fascinating. "I didn't do it, Yeronner, it's them T. gondii in me brain wot done it!"
 
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Geoff, I would find this interesting, too, but I don't think I could get past the "YIKES!" factor. Bugs of any kind, spook me, also, anything like snakes or crocks. I know they exist, but don't let me see or think of them.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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That issue is covered in the book. Some of us have a higher "yuck!" factor than others, and it may be a genetic predisposition based on survival issues, according to the author. Give it a try. If you don't like it, you don't have to read it all!
 
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Just read a memoir of a black ornithologist who grew up in rural South Carolina. "The Home Place" by J. Drew Lanham is often delightfully descriptive, sometimes funny, sometimes scary, and overall a good read. "The Warmth of Other Suns" it's not, but it does touch on a theme in "Other Suns" of how sense of place defines a family's cohesiveness.
 
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I just checked and Maryland's Digital Library doesn't have any of Lanham's books, Geoff. Right now, I am on hold for five books through our digital library. They are as follows:
Sweet Tomorrows by Debbie Macomber
The Book of Joy by the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu
Seven Brief Lessons on Physics by Carlo Rovelli
Turbo Twenty-Three by Janet Evanovich
A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar

It is really interesting watching how these holds progress. The one with the most holds in front of me is Turbo Twenty-Three Right now, I am number 160 on 26 copies. When I got on the hold list I was well over 300, but it is moving fast. These are all audio books. I was on the list for a Christmas book from November and that hold list moved slow. This one is not. I think this book which is 23 in a series, is a book that people don't like to put down until finished. Because of that and the number of copies, the hold list in front of me dwindles each day. With other types of books, it seems that people take their time reading or listening to them, perhaps, mulling over the information before moving on to another section or chapter.

Have any of you read any of the books that are on my hold list? If so, did you find them interesting?
Kind regards,
sattva


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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I haven't read any of them. "The Book of Joy" and "Seven Brief Lessons on Physics" sound excellent. I am reading (finally!) "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down."
 
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I am interested to know how you like the book. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Kalleh. I added, Hidden Agendas to my hold list. I saw the movie, and since learned they took quite a lot of liberties with it. So, I want to read the book which hadn't been released yet when they made the movie. They had access to all of her notes though.

While waiting for some of my books on hold to come in, I am re-listening to Physics of the Future by Michio Kaku and Brian Greene's The Hidden Reality. I could probably read or listen to these books a hundred times and still not fully understand it all. I keep hoping repetition will help. Sometimes, just becoming familiar with the terminology is a big help in ultimately understanding something.

A friend of mine who has a doctorate degree in mathematics has me reading a book by Ivan Nixon titled, Irrational Numbers. I was lost at the first paragraph. Part of me wants to give up, but I promised him that I would try to study and learn this. I actually asked him to recommend a book for me to read and this is the one he chose. I so admire people who are good in science and mathematics, and humbled by how difficult I find the material.

You know, we could have a reading club here, but perhaps most of you already belong to one. It would also be kind of interesting to each come up with a list of say 1-5 favorite books that we have read in our lives, and then for others to read a book from our list. Just thinking aloud here....


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
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I'm with you, sattva.

My late brother-in-law was a university lecturer in pure mathematics. Nice chap, but if his subject came up (which was quite often with him) I was hardly able to understand a word he said.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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I used to regularly read maths books for fun. Can't get hold of them so easily now though. Frown
 
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I'm reading On the Dot, a history of the period. My wife bought it thinking it a gynocological textbook and gae it to me once she realized her mistake. Big Grin


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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I'm a bit late in reading Guns, Germs, and Steel, but I've begun it. An amazing synthesis of many disciplines.
 
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My late brother-in-law was a university lecturer in pure mathematics. Nice chap, but if his subject came up (which was quite often with him) I was hardly able to understand a word he said.
Big Grin
quote:
I used to regularly read maths books for fun.
So interesting that you say "maths book" when we'd say'd "math book" here in the U.S. However, we would say "mathematics book," so maybe that's where it's from?
 
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http://www.etymonline.com/inde...h&allowed_in_frame=0 Also, "math" implies a single discipline rather than the several that mathematics contains.
 
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