Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Pirated Words Login/Join
 
Member
posted
arnie states in Links for linguaphiles that:
quote:
A pirated word is one that has been twisted by a political or commercial group for their own selfish purposes. The hotel industry knew what it was doing (well, probably) when years ago it decided that it would call its patrons "guests." Sounds good, but it means the opposite


This is a great topic I don't want to have overlooked.

My personal dislike is the word "check" as in the waitress will bring my check when I am done eating. No.....she will bring a bill to me. Unless she is paying me for eating there, that is! Wink
 
Posts: 1412 | Location: Buffalo, NY, United StatesReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
You can no longer buy eggs that are "small, medium, or large." Instead, they are "large, extra large, or jumbo." And similarly with your choices of coffee-cup size at one of the coffee boutiques.
 
Posts: 2603 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by shufitz:
You can no longer buy eggs that are "small, medium, or large." Instead, they are "large, extra large, or jumbo." And similarly with your choices of coffee-cup size at one of the coffee boutiques.


That's a variation on something that has puzzled me for years. When I was a child sliced bread could be bought as thin sliced, medium sliced and thick sliced. That made perfect sense to me. Somewhere along the line the thin sliced vanished leaviving only medium and thick sliced. In what sense can the word "medium" describe something at the bottom end of a range?
If they want only two grades surely thin and thick would make much more sense.

Glaubt es mir - das Geheimnis, um die größte Fruchtbarkeit und den größten Genuß vom Dasein einzuernten, heisst: gefährlich leben.
- Friedrich Nietzsche

Read all about my travels around the world here.
Read even more of my travel writing and poems on my weblog.
 
Posts: 7863 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Richard English
posted Hide Post
I rank sliced bread alongside Budweiser and processed cheese slices in my catalogue of foodstuffs.

How can you make a serious sandwich with such fluffy flavourless and thoroughly unpleasant stuff as your usual sliced white loaf?

Richard English
 
Posts: 8037 | Location: Partridge Green, West Sussex, UKReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Richard English:
I rank sliced bread alongside Budweiser and processed cheese slices in my catalogue of foodstuffs.

How can you make a serious sandwich with such fluffy flavourless and thoroughly unpleasant stuff as your usual sliced white loaf?

Richard English


Doesn't alter my language point though, does it ?

Glaubt es mir - das Geheimnis, um die größte Fruchtbarkeit und den größten Genuß vom Dasein einzuernten, heisst: gefährlich leben.
- Friedrich Nietzsche

Read all about my travels around the world here.
Read even more of my travel writing and poems on my weblog.
 
Posts: 7863 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
"The hotel industry knew what it was doing (well, probably) when years ago it decided that it would call its patrons "guests."

And the health spa has its "clients".
 
Posts: 1184Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I posted this in Arnie's Linguaphile thread, but I have been fighting my profession for years for using the word "client" instead of "patient". Nurses think "patient" sounds too dependent, which I suppose is true. Yet, what the physicians and physical therapists call "patients", we call "clients". Just doesn't make sense to me.

Yes, Bob, I agree with you about 2 types of bread being labelled as "thick" and "thin." Now, in the U.S. thin bread is very popular because of kilocalories (since this is a word board I thought I should be accurate with the terminology. Calorie, of course, is technically wrong.)
 
Posts: 23298 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Hic et ubique
posted Hide Post
"Calorie, of course, is technically wrong."

It is? Howso?
(I learn something new every day here.)
 
Posts: 1204Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of C J Strolin
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by shufitz:
You can no longer buy eggs that are "small, medium, or large." Instead, they are "large, extra large, or jumbo." And similarly with your choices of coffee-cup size at one of the coffee boutiques.

You may not be able to buy those eggs but they still do exist. The powers-that-be have definite standards outlining the difference between, say, a "jumbo" and an "extra large." Consumer demand (or, more precisely, lack thereof) is why you rarely see "medium" eggs on the grocers' shelves.

Two sidenotes:

1.) The smallest sized egg is labled a "pee-wee" and is usually the result of a very young hen's first efforts in egg production. I'd love to see a restaurant somewhere offer "pee-wee fried eggs."

2.) Grocers originally got that name because they sold things by the gross.
 
Posts: 1517 | Location: Illinois, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
quote:
It is? Howso?


A calorie is the amount of energy to raise the temperature of 1 mL of water, at 15 degrees C, by 1 degree C. However, the amount of energy involved in the metabolism of food is fairly large. Therefore, a kilocalorie, or 1000 calories, is used. Scientfic books, for example, will call this a Calorie (capital "c") or a kilocalorie. However, in the lay literature, we still call it a calorie, which is technically wrong.

I used to drive my students to distraction by insisting that they use the correct terminology.
 
Posts: 23298 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of LoriL
posted Hide Post
How about Starbucks, and THEIR sizes?

small = tall
grande = medium
venti = large

Marketing, marketing.....
 
Posts: 51 | Location: Seattle, WA USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Lori, so wonderful to see you posting again!

How about the restaurants that sell drinks in large and supersize only?
 
Posts: 1412 | Location: Buffalo, NY, United StatesReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
We have a cafe in Buffalo that instead of having orders be "for here" or"to go", they are either "parked" or "on wheels".:P
 
Posts: 26 | Location: buffalo, nyReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Salespeople are no longer salesmen or saleswomen or even salesclerks. They are now "sales associates" or just "associates."

Tinman
 
Posts: 2769 | Location: Shoreline, WA, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of LoriL
posted Hide Post
or "account managers".
 
Posts: 51 | Location: Seattle, WA USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Hic et ubique
posted Hide Post
My garbage is collected weekly by "sanitation engineers."

And the erstwhile housewife is now promoted to "domestic engineer," in much the same way that high school classes in cooking and sewing have long been termed "home economics."
 
Posts: 1204Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
When i was in school, i had "technology" class instead of woodshop.
 
Posts: 26 | Location: buffalo, nyReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of WinterBranch
posted Hide Post
quote:
Salespeople are no longer salesmen or saleswomen or even salesclerks. They are now "sales associates" or just "associates."




And let's not forget that there are no longer 'customers', they're referred as to as 'guests'.
 
Posts: 222 | Location: TexasReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
... and in medicine those receiving care have [d]evolved from "patients" to "members" (of an insurance plan) to "covered lives" in an HMO. Shudder.

That's even worse than someone in the social service/counseling field dealing with not "patients" but "clients." But not very much.
 
Posts: 5588 | Location: Worcester, MA, USReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I have never heard of "covered lives", thank heavens! I have always fought the nursing use of "client" (losing battle, I'm afraid), but "covered lives" I couldn't live with!

WinterBranch, I don't know how you feel about it, but I hate it when the department store clerk (yes, I say "clerk"!) calls me his/her guest. I am the customer--not a guest
 
Posts: 23298 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
We have a cafe in Buffalo that instead of having orders be "for here" or"to go", they
are either "parked" or "on wheels".:P
------------------------------------------
When someone asks me, "For here or to go?" and I'm eating the garbage on-premises, I reply, "Both. You wouldn't want me to eat it here, then leave it here, would you?"

As for that assinine Starbucks B.S., on the rare occasion that I patronize one of those places, I say, "small, or medium, or large," refusing adamantly to buy into their silly size mis-description.

Asa the curmudgeon
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of C J Strolin
posted Hide Post
Does anyone remember Godfrey Cambridge? My God, he was funny. He comes to mind here because it was he who introduced me to the word and the concept of euphemism. At the age of 12 or 14 or so, I heard the following on one of his comedy LP's (and LP's - remember them?) and had to hit the dictionary to get the joke:


I was on a flight coming in from New York when the pilot came on the intercom and said, "Ladies and gentlemen, it seems we have lost the service of our second power plant. Please keep your seats."

I stood up and screamed, "'Second power plant'?! Don't be euphemistic, dammit, that's an engine! We May Die!!
 
Posts: 1517 | Location: Illinois, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


Copyright © 2002-12