Wordcraft Community Home Page
vulcanology or volcanology

This topic can be found at:
http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/932607094/m/2780006886

October 11, 2017, 08:40
Geoff
vulcanology or volcanology
In my youth I saw vulcanology used to describe the study of volcanoes, but lately that spelling isn't recognized as proper. Do others use the "u" spelling, or am I the last one?
October 11, 2017, 11:46
Proofreader
You're the last of a dying breed.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
October 12, 2017, 19:33
Kalleh
I've not seen the "u," Geoff. It reminds me of Vulcans.
October 13, 2017, 07:44
Geoff
quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
It reminds me of Vulcans.
Is a vulcan a container made of heat-treated rubber?
October 17, 2017, 19:38
Kalleh
Yep.
October 18, 2017, 06:15
Proofreader
Take your pick here


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
October 18, 2017, 20:00
Kalleh
The Star Trek references win out for me.
November 22, 2017, 11:12
shufitz
quote:
Originally posted by Geoff:
In my youth I saw vulcanology used to describe the study of volcanoes, but lately that spelling isn't recognized as proper. Do others use the "u" spelling, or am I the last one?
How else could it possibly be spelled?
I’m with you, Geoff.
November 23, 2017, 08:52
Geoff
Whew! I'm pleased to know I'm not totally alone in this! Thanks, Shu!
November 25, 2017, 16:49
tinman
Vulcan (later vulcano) is an obsolete word for volcano (OED Online, attested from c1400), apparently named after Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and metalworking. The first known use of volcano was 1665 (M-W). Volcanology came out much later (attested from 1800) and vulcanology later still (attested from 1859). You’ll still see words like vulcano, vulcanic, and volcanology. Try not to let it upset you.
December 06, 2017, 20:40
Kalleh
quote:
Try not to let it upset you.


It is interesting how words and use of language can be upsetting, isn't it? I have a friend who always says "amendable" for "amenable," and it just grates on me.

What are some of yours?
December 07, 2017, 06:45
Geoff
I'm grateful when the sewer has a grate over it and I don't fall in.
December 08, 2017, 05:54
Proofreader
Apparently there's alanguage crisis
in Quebec.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
December 08, 2017, 06:27
Geoff
IMHO, "courriel" is a lot prettier than "email."

It's good to know that in Quebec, at least, there's something to cause outrage besides groping and nuclear war.
December 11, 2017, 07:41
bethree5
quote:
Originally posted by tinman:
Vulcan (later vulcano) is an obsolete word for volcano (OED Online, attested from c1400), apparently named after Vulcan, the Roman god of fire and metalworking. The first known use of volcano was 1665 (M-W). Volcanology came out much later (attested from 1800) and vulcanology later still (attested from 1859). You’ll still see words like vulcano, vulcanic, and volcanology. Try not to let it upset you.

Hi tinman, doing a driveby today. Interesting. I've noticed that in regional southern-Italian accents, u vowel is often sounded for o [official spelling] - e.g. "moh-tsa-reh-la" north, "MOO-tsa-REL south for mozzarella. Just follows the typical 'embouchure' for the area. I've noticed that in a number of languages' etymology, there have been u and o variants, like this one in English. Volcano is easier to say than vulcano in today's slack-jawed English. But vulcanology is easier than volcanology. Guess we just like to keep our spelling consistent.
December 11, 2017, 08:02
bethree5
quote:
Originally posted by Proofreader:
Apparently there's alanguage crisis
in Quebec.
Tempest in a teapot, eh? The French used to be so particular about this sort of thing. I've been reading mystery novels by Michel Bussi. He's very attuned to local lingo. The novels set near Le Havre show a shocking level of English words mixed routinely into daily dialog. But then the one I'm reading now is set in Réunion, & regular speech by French immigrants is sprinkled with Bantu, Tamil, et al words.

I'll wager you won't find Parisian shopkeepers grinning "Bonjour, Hi!" Big Grin.
December 11, 2017, 21:56
Kalleh
I don't know. When we were in Paris, the people were very friendly toward us and very willing to speak in either English or French - with the exception of one waiter who finally said, "Just order in English!"
December 13, 2017, 07:04
Geoff
I am reminded of a New Yorker cartoon of many years ago depicting a flummoxed diner in a French restaurant who is told by the waiter, "Now that you have told me to unsaddle the horses, the innkeeper has caught fire, would you care to order in English?"
December 13, 2017, 20:50
Kalleh
Big Grin I have only recently subscribed to the New Yorker, and I love it. Borowitz's cartoons are my absolute favorites.