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Anybody know why is turkey tangle fogfruit is so called
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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I had no idea there was such a thing! I have seen the aftermath of a truckload of turkeys tangled in the fog, but that's a bit different, I suspect. There are poultry farms in Southern Oregon, and very dense fog settles down on Interstate 5 at times, with dire results for man and beast.
 
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Asa, I'm sure you're on the right track. I can understand "tangle" as the undergrowth is indeed tangled; yet not "turkey"

This topic is of vital importance and so I invite further speculation even if not definitive--thanks all

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quote:
This topic is of vital mportance

The mind boggles. Eek


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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The boggled mind googles. ... Roll Eyes
 
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I was totally stumped as well! Thanks for the link Super Sleuth Jerry. Mystery solved!
 
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Jerry, Sci: Forgive an old fart on the brink of senility but my PC skills are somewhat limited, and I can't find a sublink in Sci's link that explains it, help me
 
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I believe the link was in Jerry's post. I didn't google. I just clicked on the underlined words in Jerry's post and there was a beautiful explination of it. Smile

Em
 
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While, there was not much in the way of an etymological explanation, there was a nice picture on the linked-to site.

[Addendum: pretty fanciful, but this page has a suggestion, and this one some other common names of the plant. Some more common names (from a Puertorican PhD dissertation: common fog fruit, common fiddlewood, northern fogfruit, cape-turkeytangle, capeweed, Turkey tangle fogfruit, Turkey-tangle, fog fruit, weed; cidrón, yerba de Sapo; hierba de la Virgen María. ]

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Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Dale I am farther beyond the brink of senility than you are, and I must now invoke my personal statute of limitations.

You will surely go down in history as one to whom this question was vitally important.

~~~~~ jerry
 
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Our attention is drawn to Cannabis sativa (Hemp), which is one of the hundreds of listed plants that are native to Illinois.

As far as we know that's the only listed plant whose cultivation, possession, sale, purchase, or use is seen as criminal activity that is currently fueling the vast Law Enforcement and Prison Industries.

In parts of California that were not burnt in recent wildfires, Law Enforcers are finding and destroying farms run by people who are allegedly trashier than normal folks.

It's easy to see that when other weeds are added to the Criminal List, the USA's huge prison population (now more than two million) has a potential for growing to unimaginable dimensions.

What next? Sassafras?

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English hemp < Old English hænep is related to Greek κανναβις (kannabis). My favorite quotation concerning hemp is from Herodotus:
quote:
1. The Scythians then take the seed of this hemp and, crawling in under the mats, throw it on the red-hot stones, where it smoulders and sends forth such fumes that no Greek vapor-bath could surpass it. 2. The Scythians howl in their joy at the vapor-bath. This serves them instead of bathing, for they never wash their bodies with water. 3. But their women pound cypress and cedar and frankincense wood on a rough stone, adding water also, and with the thick stuff thus pounded they anoint their bodies and faces, as a result of which not only does a fragrant scent come from them, but when on the second day they take off the ointment, their skin becomes clear and shining. (The Histories IV.lxxv.1–3.)


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Jerry thank you for your patience and good works. As Sci asserts, clearly the link to which I had reference was yours--though still I fail to find the ety link--and thanks much also to zm
 
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It is a beautiful flower, isn't it?

What did they mean by this comment:

"This Species is not native to and does not escape in Illinois."

Does not escape in Illinois? Does that mean it doesn't grow outside the borders of Illinois?
 
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I think they mean that it won't survive and become invasive if it escapes from the garden or greenhouse. Maybe it's not frost tolerant.


Richard English
 
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Originally posted by zmježd:
My favorite quotation concerning hemp is from Herodotus:
quote:
... The Scythians howl in their joy at the vapor-bath...


The tribal men were using a therapy for bodily filth quite like that employed by my dear mom, who took blackberry brandy for certain stomach ailments. "I'm not sure that it works," she would pronounce, "but after a dose or two, I don't care!"
 
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Kalleh, Rich: It is indeed a beautiful flower but the growth is invasive, while the undergrowth is truly a tangle. Good cover, however, to keep your mulch pile from blowing away, so long as you keep watering it
 
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So the Turkey Tangle Fogfruit is just a pretty Kudzu?
 
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Kudzu repeat that? Wink
 
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Kalleh, Rich: It is indeed a beautiful flower but the growth is invasive, while the undergrowth is truly a tangle.

Then I have no idea what that phrase means.


Richard English
 
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Kudzu repeat that?


Weed better knot.
 
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Then I have no idea what that phrase means.

I think it means what you think it means. It also means dalehileman doesn't live in Illinois.
 
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nev: Oh but I did, I was born in Galesburg and lived in Chicago. Why would you think not

Kalleh, Rich: It (the fogfruit) is (has, bears) indeed a beautiful flower but the growth is invasive (that is, it will go anywhere it finds a little water, in addition sending out exploratory shoots in every direction), while the undergrowth (meaning the runners, usu not visible under the foliage) is truly a tangle.
 
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nev: Oh but I did, I was born in Galesburg and lived in Chicago. Why would you think not

I said you don't live in Illinois. Present tense. Why? Because you are complaining that L. nodiflora is invasive, and apparently it is not invasive in Illinois or in the northern states in general, according to various online descriptions, presumably because it doesn't tolerate winter well.
 
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Nev: Aha now I get it, thanks
 
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Originally posted by jerry thomas:
quote:
Kudzu repeat that?


Weed better knot.


You guys are too much.

Here's a pic of Kudzu growing on the trees in Atlanta. It takes over. Someone thought it a good idea to bring it over from Japan to use as ground cover in the south. Kudzu takes over wherever it is planted down here. YUCK!

Here's a close-up and pretty good blog post about how horrible it is. Not nearly as pretty at the turkey tangle fogfruit!

Not only are we learning about words but vegetation as well!

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Yecch, it actually looks familiar! I'll bet we have it sneaking around here in NJ, too, which is not called the Garden State for nothing. Our mild climate is illustrated by an enormous tulip tree (no, not a magnolia-- a real, Southern tulip tree) on a corner near my house.

In my little patch for 5 yrs or so I have been fighting another lobe-leaved interloper--this one native to China-- which I eventually identified as a white mulberry. You can digto China and you won't dislodge its parsnippy taproot. I chop it to the ground several times each summer; if you turn your back it grows 6 feet. Now I've got another one attaching itself to a deck support! Nerts!
 
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Yes, you do have it in New Jersey. The Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station reports it in 58 locations, though it says only one was a serious infestation. The USDA plant profile for kudzu shows a distribution map. Scroll down a ways and you'll find a list of states where it's a noxious weed.

New Jersey Governor McGreevey issued a Policy Directive in 2004:
quote:
On February 27, 2004 Governor James E. McGreevey signed Executive Order #97 mandating the formation of the New Jersey Invasive Species Council and requiring, among others, the development of a comprehensive New Jersey Invasive Species Management Plan.

The appendix lists invasive plants. I don't know if that plan has been completed.

Kudzu was first found west of Texas in 2002 in Oregon (note that it's been found in Nova Scotia), and the following year it was found in Washington. Though the infestations were small and isolated, both states moved fast to declare it a noxious weed. The weather up here is mild, despite what many people think, and we don't want it to get a foothold.

Here are more photos of kudzu taken by Jack Anthony of Yahoolavista Publishing in Dahlonega, Georgia. Click on the various links to find pictures of houses, barns, road signs, road equipment, etc. covered with kudzu. But don't stay in any one place too long or it might cover you, too.

By the way, there is a Yahoola Creek Falls in Lumpkin County, Georgia.
 
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I came across an article about kudzu (Vine that ate the South is creeping northward) on the UBC Botanical Garden forum.

Researchers from the University of Toronto are concerned that Kudzu may invade Canada (It's already in Nova Scotia, according to an article I posted earlier). A PhD student reported seeing a 10- to 15-year-old plant in Albany New York, where it survived -28 degree F. weather. Kalleh may be interested in the last sentence:

"In Illinois it is being spread by seed," Blossey says

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