Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Word of the day Login/Join
 
Junior Member
posted
I am looking for a word. It refers to a person who is given a small amount of power over some menial task or item and lets that authority become an overwhelming and unreasonable dictatorial type pattern of behavior.

"You can't have pens from the supply closet without filling out a requisition form, asking and receiving verbal permission, and describing your exact activity with such company resources." Smile

It was included in a "word of the day" calendar I saw years ago and I'm drawing a blank.
 
Posts: 2Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
Great question.
 
Posts: 2600 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I can't remember either, but I seem to recall a name rather than a single word. Is there a dictionary of eponyms on line? I can't find one.
 
Posts: 4431 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Martinet?
 
Posts: 2369Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
Welcome, Robert. It is always nice to have new people here.

There certainly should be a word like that. Goofy's word is interesting ("strict disciplinarian), but I am not sure it is what you mean. Arnie, any ideas? Bob? Bethree? Sattva?
 
Posts: 23282 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I don't know of a word that fits either, I thought maybe someone else would know. Maybe, it is a new word that needs to be created.


"Wishing in gladness and in safety, may all beings be at ease." ~from the Metta Sutta
 
Posts: 442Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Prig gets half of it, but not all. Still cogitating...
 
Posts: 4431 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
The decidedly offensive and non-pc phrase in common use where I come from is "Little Hitler" but nowadays people are rightly wary of comparing everything to Nazis.
 
Posts: 7858 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
The best I could come up with was
    lordling
    princeling
    petty potentate,
but I think Bob's is far better.
 
Posts: 2600 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Geoff:
Is there a dictionary of eponyms on line?
I'd forgotten about this one.
 
Posts: 2600 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
OK, Shufitz! Didn't you put it together?

How about "bumbledom" for the word we can't recall? https://en.oxforddictionaries....definition/bumbledom
 
Posts: 4431 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of bethree5
posted Hide Post
Oh my gosh Robert, your post immediately put me in mind of a certain bureaucrat, back when I worked in purchasing depts for big arch-constr firms. Purchasing was the lowest-prestige dept in a world where engrs were once free to name their fave bidders based on eqpt design, but got reined in mid-20thC so as to promote more competition & eliminate corruption. W/n 20 yrs this firm segregated bidder's list to a dept w/n the dept, staffed by paper-passing form-filling bean-counters. This mini-tyrant had graduated from mail-room thro office-supplies to a position of tail wags dog, & he loved wagging that dog!

If there is a word for such a creature, I want to know it!
 
Posts: 2049 | Location: As they say at 101.5FM: Not New York... Not Philadelphia... PROUD TO BE NEW JERSEY!Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
"Little Napoleon" is all I can come up with.

And more recently we have Nurse Ratched and The Trunchbull.

But all of these are people with the trait, not the trait itself.
 
Posts: 5586 | Location: Worcester, MA, USReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by haberdasher:
"Little Napoleon" is all I can come up with.

Napoleon WAS little. As was Alexander The Great. So why didn't Danny DiVito conquer the world?
 
Posts: 4431 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I think Geoff's word is it: bumbledon. Great find, Geoff!
 
Posts: 23282 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
If it is British, it's probably jobsworth.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10927 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
I'd forgotten "jobsworth". That would definitely be right in the UK.
 
Posts: 7858 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
That one looks perfect, too. Somehow I knew our British counterparts would come up with something.
 
Posts: 23282 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Junior Member
posted Hide Post
You guys are great!! I think Jobsworth is the exact right word. I've struggled for so long to find this expressed so succinctly and I appreciate your help!
 
Posts: 2Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of bethree5
posted Hide Post
Just caught up on this thread thro robert's post. Love this word "jobsworth"!
 
Posts: 2049 | Location: As they say at 101.5FM: Not New York... Not Philadelphia... PROUD TO BE NEW JERSEY!Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Proofreader
posted Hide Post
The American version wuld be "Trumpsworth."


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
Posts: 5991 | Location: Rhode IslandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
Presumably the Apple version would be a Wozniakworth.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10927 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Doesn't "Jobsworth" work for Apple also?
 
Posts: 4431 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I love the word, too, Bethree!
 
Posts: 23282 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


Copyright © 2002-12