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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Regarding the UK/USA confusion as to what lemondade is, you might be interested to know that the Jap......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Although this is not a reply to a posted comment, it does seem to me to have to do with the general ......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
You would be corrrect in assuming that most Americans equate "compadre" with "companion", although i......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Yes, "neat" is still used in that way in the USA, although it dates the person using it!...
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
"Compadre" is sometimes heard in Spanish/Mexican-related films (often Westerns), but means something......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Regarding British/American uses of "keen": In the UK you would say "I'm keen on cooking" (meaning Am......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Sorry, but what does the word "cutsie" mean?...
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Bravo, Bob! I have had the same problem myself in similar situations here in Norway. Once I announce......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Just for the sake of comparison, I'd like to mention how it's done in Oslo, where I teach. For examp......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
I think you have to define what you mean by ranking. There's probably a lot more invisible ranking (......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
I believe the phrase was "Cheerio pip-pip" and it was common in British films shown in the States. P......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
I agree with you, Duncan, especially if the stress (when spoken) is on the "not"....
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
Like the US expression "I could care less" which makes no sense at all. It is actually "I couldn't c......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
It makes the problem of learning how to conjugate irregular verbs much easier. Just stay in the pres......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
I think it's interesting with the variations in spelling. What is really interesting is to see how E......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
I also like the way the Norman French influenced the "classy" layers of society (e.g. politics and d......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
It was difficult for the French to accept the demise of French as the prominent world language, so I......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
"Groundnut" is a common term (for what the Americans call peanut) all over Africa, where it is often......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri

Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
That was my point, although I perhaps didn't make it clear. In the end, the borrowing of Afro-Americ......
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Discussion Topic  RE: British vs. American English (in Potpourri) by markmywords48
That's why I didn't agree that it was an African-American phrase, myself being white and hearing it ......
Wordcraft Home Page > Wordcraft Community Home Page > Forums > Potpourri


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