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Picture of Kalleh
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I've been trying to bring up the Chicago Bears here, but Shu keeps telling me to "keep it about words!" Well, I have been saved!

The news is reporting on how popular the Chicago Bears have become around the world. In one question and answer period with our quarterback a Japanese reporter asked him, "What do you want to tell your fans in Japan?" Wink

The Tribune today reported on the word Bears in 9 languages:

Osos - Spanish
Medvede - Russian
Misie - Polish
Ours French
Xiong dui - Chinese
Gom - Korean
Arkoudes - Greek
Dubim - Hebrew
Kuma - Japanese

I find it a strange list. No German???

Anyway....GO BEARS!
 
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..... more BEARS translations .....


Simplified Chinese
Dutch - beren
German - Baren
Italian - orsi
Portuguese - ursos
Russian - медведи

Edited to correct the error in the Dutch, where my first attempt showed "bears" (English) as "draagt" (Dutch).

Double checking I found I had erroneously used the verb instead of the noun. (I should have known --- "draagt" is cognate of "drags."

This anecdote comes to mind ... In the little boy's stuffed-animal collection was a bear with crossed eyes. "I named him Gladly, the child explained, "Because in church they sing about him ------ Gladly, The Cross-Eyed Bear."

This message has been edited. Last edited by: jerry thomas,
 
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The Chicago Bears have achieved fame of a sort, now being mentioned on Snopes (or to be precise, the actions of one of their fans was). http://www.snopes.com/photos/signs/chicagobears.asp


Richard English
 
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Osos - Spanish
Medvede - Russian
Misie - Polish
Ours French
Xiong dui - Chinese
Gom - Korean
Arkoudes - Greek
Dubim - Hebrew
Kuma - Japanese


Sanskrit ऋक्ष r̥ks̥ā, Latin ursi (whence French ours, Italian orsi, Spanish osos) is related to (Classical) Greek αρκτοι (arktoi, whence our arctic), (cf. Middle Irish art, Welsh airt, related perhaps to the legendary name Arthur, these Celtic forms are not plurals).

The Russian is an interesting word: it's related to the PIE root *medhu- for honey, whence our mead 'honey wine'. The Polish looks more like the diminutive of the proper name Michael (Micky). The mascot for the 1980 Olympics in the Soviet Union was also called Миша (Misha).

[Corrected Greek and Latin forms to be plural, not singular.]

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Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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I love all these words; thanks z and Jerry.

I am a little irritated by Snopes, though. There aren't more important things to run down in the world today, except for a huge minority of Bears fans? Give me a break.

For the record, I hadn't heard about those signs, and I watched those games. I suspect others have, but I believe I keep on top of the news, so at least the media hasn't gone over the top on this one.

Too bad, though, Snopes didn't refer to this story in their rantings. There's almost always another side to everything.
 
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I am a little irritated by Snopes, though. There aren't more important things to run down in the world today, except for a huge minority of Bears fans? Give me a break.

Remember, Snopes is about confirming or denying urban legends. It seems that the story about the badly-behaved Bears fan(s) has been circulating and this is why Snopes decided to investigate it. Had the rumour been false then I am sure snopes would have debunked it as readily as they confirmed it.


Richard English
 
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Alright then. What if...I think that very nice story about Bears fans who wanted to help Katrina victims is wrong. If I write Snopes and ask them to verify it, will they? If they do, will they give it prominence? Very doubtful. That's an example of dog biting man; it won't sell newspapers or bring hits to Snopes. Your example, though? That's an example of man biting dog...very sexy!

I also doubt that those who don't live in the U.S. know the background of that sign. While I in no way condone it, and I find it tacky, the Bears had played that game in New Orleans. The reference to Katrina didn't come out of the blue, as it seemed to in that Snopes article. That sign had nothing to do with the Super Bowl game; it was about a game that had been played and that the Bears had won. It was meant to be funny, and I doubt they meant any more than that. They just had a lame sense of humor.
 
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If I write Snopes and ask them to verify it, will they?

The answer to that would probably be determined by whether it had yet reached the status of an urban legend - which I doubt it has. To become an urban legend it seems to me that the story must be capable of being preceded by the words, "...Did you know..." and ended "...It's amazing but it's quite true - I know someone who actually talked to someone who was there..."

I doubt that the Bears' good news story would qualify.


Richard English
 
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SO, just for argumment's sake, if that photograph had turned out to be a phoney made by a disgruntled Saints fan who wanted to make out that Bears fans are crude and insensitive, circulated widely on the internet, and Snopes had investigated and reported that the picture was a phoney - would you still say that they shouldn't use the story? After all it would be only one Saints fan with an axe to grind, not all of them.

Snopes just investigated a widely circulated photo (which I for one had already seen, and I live in England, remember) and said yes it's true. They can't influence the outcome of their investigation, they just report it.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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The answer to that would probably be determined by whether it had yet reached the status of an urban legend - which I doubt it has. To become an urban legend it seems to me that the story must be capable of being preceded by the words, "...Did you know..." and ended "...It's amazing but it's quite true - I know someone who actually talked to someone who was there..."
Therein lies my point. You see, urban legends don't often develop when something is positive or normal, like that people actually help Katrina victims.
quote:
SO, just for argumment's sake, if that photograph had turned out to be a phoney made by a disgruntled Saints fan who wanted to make out that Bears fans are crude and insensitive, circulated widely on the internet, and Snopes had investigated and reported that the picture was a phoney - would you still say that they shouldn't use the story? After all it would be only one Saints fan with an axe to grind, not all of them.
No, Bob. I am saying they wouldn't have. It would have been quietly forgotten.

Look at what that story did to the Bears internationally. I post about some Bears words, and the one response from those who don't live in the U.S. is how awful that picture was. The power of the media is amazing to me.

By the way, GO BEARS! (We're not all insensitive slobs; Snopes, look into that! Wink)
 
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I don't believe for one moment that Snopes has an axe to grind against the Bears or Chicago. Someone, probably more than one person, has asked if that picture is true, they've investigated and said that it is (which isn't in dispute). They would have reported just as surely had it been false. Somewhere on Snopes is a message board where they print mail they have received. They are accused simultaneously of being pro-democrat and pro-republican, pro-christian and anti-christian, pro-gun and anti-gun and I'll bet, if you search, pro-Chicago and anti-Chicago.

I've read quite a lot of it and it seems that whenever someone is upset by the result of one of Snopes investigations they get accused of bias.

As for the picture, what it shows is that one guy is a jackass. It doesn't show anything about anyone other than that one guy.

I'm rather baffled at why this one thing seems to be upsetting you. They checked it out. It's true. So what?


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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Oh, let's forget it. It isn't Snopes that irritates me, really. They just did what they were asked to do...look into that sign. And of course I know they don't have an axe to grind against the Bears. If that's the way you read my posts, I feel very silly. My only point was, and it's getting weaker by the moment, I find it exasperating that it's that Chicago Bears story that the international crowd hears about Chicago and our Bears. The problem isn't with Snopes, but with what people find interesting, I guess...similar to what I said above: it's the man-bites-dog stories that are sexy.

I guess I haven't been that articulate if you actually believe that I think Snopes has an axe to grind against the Bears! Sorry.
quote:
As for the picture, what it shows is that one guy is a jackass. It doesn't show anything about anyone other than that one guy.
Yeah, but you know better than that, Bob. That's how generalizations and stereotypes develop, especially when the information is broadcast around the world.
 
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To show that the world's media (or at least the UK's) is even-handed about it all, the Chicago Bears match against the Indianapolis Colts is being broadcast live on ITV tonight - at 2245 our time (I assume the Dolphin Stadium wasn't affected by the savage storms in Florida a couple of days ago).

Although I have no interest in any sport of any kind, I am always amazed at how much coverage our mainstream media give to minority sports (and American football is certainly that in the UK). Out of interest, was our own football cup final broadcast on US mainstream TV? (ITV 1 is probably the the most popular TV channel we have - although it vies with the BBC for that honour).


Richard English
 
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I would add that Sky Sports is also broadcasting the game live. Sky is a satellite broadcaster that tends to buy up exclusive rights to sports. It's rare that they would share live coverage.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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To show that the world's media (or at least the UK's) is even-handed about it all, the Chicago Bears match against the Indianapolis Colts is being broadcast live on ITV tonight

Of course, that wasn't my point. Yes, the UK does broadcast world sports more than we do.
quote:
Out of interest, was our own football cup final broadcast on US mainstream TV?

I don't know what football cup you mean. Do you mean the World Cup? If so, yes, it was shown in bars around the city and quite a few people watched it. You may mean something else though.

However, to the question at hand, I find it interesting that I had read about the men who went down to New Orleans and helped the Katrina victims. However, I had not read about those signs that Richard posted about, and in fact this was the first time I saw them. Interesting.
 
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Sorry Da Bears didn't win. :-(

There weren't even that many decent commercials this year. I was also disappointed in the halftime entertainment. Prince? Sheesh!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
 
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I hate to admit I was hoping the Colts won... I love the Manning familly; DaBears gave it their best in pouring down rain. I think the Super Bowl needs to be played in a domed stadium. I would hate to think I had paid good money to sit in the rain!

Is his name now Prince again?? I thought he changed it...
 
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I don't know what football cup you mean. Do you mean the World Cup?

No. The cup final, like the Superbowl, is an exclusively national event for British football (soccer) teams.

I never watch it myself but it is impossible to be unaware that it's on.

The World cup is different - although it's the same sport. That is a knockout competition that any country can enter (and I believe that the USA entered a team last year - although I don't think they did all that well).


Richard English
 
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Well, I am thinking then that the British cup final isn't broadcast here, but I don't know for sure.

It's sad, but it's true, the Bears lost.
Whenever our quarterback tossed...
I opened the door
and let our a roar
In our wintery, below zero frost!

We are in a real deep freeze here in Chicago. Just adds to the irritation of the Bears losing!
 
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In the interests of accuracy, it's not the British FA cup final, but the English (plus a couple of Welsh teams that play in the English leagues but never get anywhere). The Scots and Irish have their own cups.

BTW, I understand Prince realised in the end the futility of being the Artist Formerly Known as Prince, and wishes it to be known that the Artist Formerly Known as Prince now wishes to be known as Prince again. Cool


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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In the interests of accuracy, it's not the British FA cup final,

I am happy to be corrected. As I said, I know very little about football, and care rather less than that.


Richard English
 
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BTW, I understand Prince realised in the end the futility of being the Artist Formerly Known as Prince, and wishes it to be known that the Artist Formerly Known as Prince now wishes to be known as Prince again.

That's because he owns the rights to the name again. He became TAFKAP when he split with his record company (Warner Brothers, I think), who owned the rights to the name. He trademarked the Egyptian-icon thing at the same time. When WB's rights expired he became Prince again.
 
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We are in a real deep freeze here in Chicago.

We've got it here in Ohio, as well. Second day off school for Simon, just because of the cold! Something about kids standing at bus stops in -20F windchill - blah blah blah. Wimps, I tell you! Why, in MY DAY we walked to school in weather like this!


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"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
 
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Yeah, but you know better than that, Bob. That's how generalizations and stereotypes develop, especially when the information is broadcast around the world.


Don't feel bad, Kalleh. Once, about 25 years ago, an entire stadium full of Philadelphia Eagles fans booed Santa Claus, and the world has never forgotten it.

As for the weather, thank goodness it is now up in the balmy 20s! (Fahrenheit.)
 
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It's still awful here...minus 10 tonight! This has been one of the worst winters ever! They aren't closing the schools here, though, CW. That's amazing!

I remember one December 23rd when I wanted to take our 3 small children to Wisconsin (2-hour drive) to visit my parents. My 5 year-old had pneumonia. My 2-year-old had a fever of 105 because of strep. And my month-old baby had just had surgery for a hernia and was vomiting. It was minus 80 degrees, chill factor, outside. Shu, very sweetely, put his arm around me and said, "Honey, what happens if something happens to the car with 3 sick children in this cold?" I knew he was right, but I so wanted my mother! Wink
 
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As some of you may know, we had snow in the UK this week. It upset traffic and close schools here.

Of course, everyone moaned about it and asked why we can't cope with snow when all other countries can - which is primarily a demonstration of ignorance about the world. Snow affects transport wherever it falls and we in England cope very well considering that:

1. We get heavy now very rarely - maybe once every three years.

2. When we do get snow it is particularly slippery snow because it is so close to its melting point. Snow at 30 degrees is far more treacherous than snow at 10 degrees.

3. Because of our average winter temperatures, generally in the mid-thirties, it needs only a small shift in temperature for the forecast rain to fall as snow - or vice versa.

4. Our weather patterns are very erratic, being influenced by the several different climatic types that surround us.

But moaning about our country is a national sport here!


Richard English
 
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All of which may be true Richard but can you, with hand on heart, say that this piddling bit of snow would have stopped anyone going to school when you were a lad? I hate to sound like some crusty old curmugeon but when I was at school my mom would have dressed me up warm, made me put on my wellies and sent me to school. And I can guarantee that noone would have been absent from class.
Of course nowadays schools are terrified that if someone should catch a cold or, God forbid, slip on the ice, the parents would ring a solicitor before they rang a doctor.

In Dudley schools were all closed a full twenty four hours before a single snowflake had fallen. My brother tells me that where he lives (Polegate) the schools were closed on Wednesday and there has still been NO snow.

Lest anyone in the USA is misled by Richard's words into thinking England is buried under the ice I'd point out that we've had less than ten centimetres of snow, most of the main roads are perfectly clear and by comparison to our own previous winters this is scarcely more than a hard frost.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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Oh yes, one more thing. I was very glad to see that as well as better beer, more delicious food, a richer history and a greater number of inventions we also have more dangerous snow here. It's good to know we're also the world leaders in weather. Wink


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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Of course nowadays schools are terrified that if someone should catch a cold or, God forbid, slip on the ice, the parents would ring a solicitor before they rang a doctor.

That is probably the real issue! One of the less desirable imports from the USA is the change in our legal system whereby people can sue for a fixed amount and there are plenty of lawyers around who are happy to persuade them to do so on a "no win, no fee" basis. Naturally this system encourages people to sue for ridiculous sums since there is no disadvantage in so doing. I far preferred our old system where the damages, if awarded, would be assessed by an expert panel who had no personal interest in the matter.

When I was at primary school in the 1940s, not only did we have to walk to school in the freezing cold (1947 was a very cold winter) but when we got there there was precious little warmth - so we kept our scarves and gloves on. I suspect that nowadays any schoolchild who went home and complained to his parents that he had been subjected to such inhumane conditions would immediately trigger of some kind of witchhunt!

Incidentally, in Partridge Green the sun is now shining and the snow has vanished completely.


Richard English
 
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We always walked to school in the snow and ice also. We lived only two blocks from our elementary school, but nearly a mile from our junior high and high school, and so we got a lot of walking in all kinds of weather. When my own children were small, we lived in Upstate New York in the so-called "snow belt," where we would get up to 120 inches of snow per winter. The kids had snowmobile suits from the time they were little, and I remember bundling up the older one in snowsuit and boots, hat, gloves and scarf and sending him off walking down the road the three blocks to his elementary school with his friend Nicky. Nicky's mother and I used to chuckle about our neighbor who always got in her car and drove her little girl to school.

Here in Pennsylvania today, just as in England, just as in Columbus, Ohio, schools close early or open late or close altogether for two to four inches of snow. They did not close for the extreme cold these last two weeks, but we have not been as cold as the far north, nor have we had more than a centimeter or two of snow on any one day. What we have had is whipping, frigid winds, and anyone who does not wrap up warmly and wear a hat is very foolish. One woman in my office refuses to wear a hat, because it will give her "hat hair." How totally stupid!

Wordmatic
 
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One of the less desirable imports from the USA is the change in our legal system whereby people can sue for a fixed amount and there are plenty of lawyers around who are happy to persuade them to do so on a "no win, no fee" basis.

Odd -- I thought we inherited our legal system from you.
 
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Ah but the way it works is that we invent something that is marvelous and wonderful, you inherit it from us and change it around so that it is dark and evil and thoroughly despicable and then we take it back from you and use it to replace our wonderful old invention.
Just look at the language.

And I need a tongue-in-cheek smiley just to make sure no-one takes that seriously.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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Ah but the way it works is that we invent something that is marvelous and wonderful, you inherit it from us and change it around so that it is dark and evil and thoroughly despicable and then we take it back from you and use it to replace our wonderful old invention.

Just a little thing we call "innovation".
 
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Snow at 30 degrees is far more treacherous than snow at 10 degrees.

Actually, Richard, as we've learned recently, that's just not true, at least according to our meteorologists. We just had 4 inches of snow in zero degree weather, and there were two 30 car crashes on our 2 major expressways, closing both. Let's just say, traffic that day was bad. Roll Eyes The weathermen said it was much slipperier out in the frigid weather because the salt doesn't melt the ice.

Bob, you have taken the words right out of my mouth in a few of these posts. Wink
 
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I just read the whole article. As a patient, she made some good points. Nurses need to be caring about their patients, as her one agency nurse was. They shouldn't leave right at 7 am without checking on their patients, as she said happened. Still, I can only think she had an isolated experience because I've heard nothing but good things about British nurses. Happy they're not (just like American nurses), but their work remains topnotch. Her ideas are old-fashioned, though, in these times of complexity in healthcare. The 50s and 60s are gone now; nurses need to be educated at least at the baccalaureate level.

Interestingly, her quote from Beverly Malone? I just met Dr. Malone on Friday; she has quit her job at the Royal College of Nursing and has become the CEO of a nursing organization in the U.S. It's a small world.
 
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The weathermen said it was much slipperier out in the frigid weather because the salt doesn't melt the ice.

Yes. But it has to get down to around zero degrees Fahrenheit for that to happen. When Fahrenheit invented his scale, he used a freezing mixture of salt and ice to determine zero. When you add salt to ice the temperature of the mixture drops as the water turns into brine and liquifies. add more ice and more salt and the temperature drops still more. Eventually the process stops - and that's zero Fahrenheit.

Adding more ice will then simply increase the body of the mixture and adding more water will simply make more ice. So once the ambient temperature reaches zero Fahrenheit then it is quite true that salt will not longer melt the ice and, furthermore, any rain falling will turn immediately into ice.

But you will note that I did say "...Snow at 30 degrees is far more treacherous than snow at 10 degrees..." At zero degrees the situation is different - if salt is being used. But if no salt is used, then snow will get steadily less slippery the colder it gets. Snow near the poles is no more slippery than sand.

This is due to the phenomenon of "pressure thawing" - which is also the reason why British snow, at its typical 30 degrees temperature, is so slippery.


Richard English
 
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Snow near the poles is no more slippery than sand.

This is true. At -40 deg. it squeaks.
 
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It squeaks for quite a range. It was 7 F here one morning last week (-13.8C) and the snow squeaked as I walked out to get the morning paper. In upstate NY our temps got down to -20 or -25 for periods of time most winters, and the snow always squeaked. I'm sure Kalleh and Shu's snow has needed oiling as well.

WM
 
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Speaking of cold, here's an excerpt from Jack London's excellent short story, "To Build A Fire."

He was a new-comer in the land, a chechaquo, and this was his first winter. The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances. Fifty degrees below zero meant eighty odd degrees of frost. Such fact impressed him as being cold and uncomfortable, and that was all. It did not lead him to meditate upon his frailty as a creature of temperature, and upon man's frailty in general, able only to live within certain narrow limits of heat and cold; and from there on it did not lead him to the conjectural field of immortality and man's place in the universe. Fifty degrees below zero stood for a bite of frost that hurt and that must be guarded against by the use of mittens, ear-flaps, warm moccasins, and thick socks. Fifty degrees below zero was to him just precisely fifty degrees below zero. That there should be anything more to it than that was a thought that never entered his head.

As he turned to go on, he spat speculatively. There was a sharp, explosive crackle that startled him. He spat again. And again, in the air, before it could fall to the snow, the spittle crackled. He knew that at fifty below spittle crackled on the snow, but this spittle had crackled in the air. Undoubtedly it was colder than fifty below--how much colder he did not know. But the temperature did not matter.
 
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