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Luke 20:17 (King James Version) "And he beheld them, and said, What is this then that is written, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner?"

So what can we make of the rejected word?!

http://www.aolnews.com/world/a...ject-list%2F19583886


RJA
 
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Darn those gatekeepers at the OED, getting to decide what is a word and what isn't!

I'm reminded of the Hans Stengel cartoon in this post.

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Being inclined to pedantry myself, I can sympathize (Or is it just "sympath?") with those who argue that adding "ize" is usually clumsy and awkward, but if the meaning is clear, it's a word to me. "Ate," added needlessly, as in "orientate," also seems clumsy, but the meaning isn't obscure at all. I am reminded of the section in St-Exupery's The Little Prince wherein a Turkish astronomer discovers a new asteroid. He presents his discovery to a gathering of astronomers while wearing traditional Turkish clothing and is thought a quack. A year later he presents the same findings while wearing Western clothes and is hailed as a genius. We pedants must struggle to not let the clothing of a message obstruct the content.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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I have always insisted that the proper verb should be ort (the proper past participle form of orior 'to rise' being ortus in Latin). I know of no other Latinate verb derived from a present participle. I realize that this is a lost cause, similar to my championing irregardless as using the intensifying prefix in- (as in inflammable) and not its homonymous negating one in- (as in inutile).


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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That makes sense to me, Z. It also makes me realize that the term, "Ex oriente lux" is reduplicative.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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Great article, Robert. Thanks for posting it! Interestingly, my favorite e-word isn't there. Lord knows they have heard, from me anyway, that is should be included. One word there,earworm, comes from the German ohrwurm. Perhaps we should just take their word, as we did Schadenfreude. I think that would be a very useful word to have around.

quote:
Darn those gatekeepers at the OED, getting to decide what is a word and what isn't!
Interestingly, just today I was reading the 2010 edition of the Chicago Style Manual, and they said that dictionaries only report the words being used and don't take a stand on them, though they do sometimes have usage notes. Their example was moot, which has now evolved in the U.S. from meaning "debatable" to meaning "of little practical value."
 
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Yeah, I wasn't completely serious. Of course dictionaries don't decide what's a word and what isn't.
Geoff mentioned pedantry. I'm inclined to pedantry sometimes, but that means I check all the details about the history and usage of the word in question, and I often discover that the people complaining about the word have got it wrong.
 
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Odd that they would reject earworm. I saw it used in print last week by someone who only speaks US English.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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Ear worm is becoming my new epicaricacy. It is in Wikipedia, the Urban Dictionary, Word Spy, The Free Dictionary, Word IQ, Wordnik, Dictionary.com, Onelook, American Heritage Dictionary, Cambridge International Dictionary of English, Worthless Word for the Day, and even others! Further, it has more than 3,000,000 hits on Google. I think it's a real English word, though they've called it a "loanword." It makes sense as we have no word for that concept.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I think it's a real English word, though they've called it a "loanword."


A loanword is just a word that's been borrowed from another language. It's sort of a silly term, since it's not like loanwords are ever returned.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by goofy:
quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I think it's a real English word, though they've called it a "loanword."


A loanword is just a word that's been borrowed from another language. It's sort of a silly term, since it's not like loanwords are ever returned.


I just had a very silly vision of all the other languages popping round to us and asking for their words back.
 
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though they've called it a "loanword."

It's a loan translation or calque. Like "honeymoon" in Spanish, luna de miela.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Is the root of miela the same one from which we get mellifluous? There's a Slavic family name, Miele, so I'm guessing it's one of those widely scattered IE root words. I leave it to better minds to confirm.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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Is the root of miela the same one from which we get mellifluous?

Yes. Latin mel, mellis, 'honey'; the names Melinda and Melissa 'bee' are related, too. From PIE *mel-it-, genitive *mel-nes-. English mildew is also from the same root.

Miele

I'm pretty sure that Miele is a German name (at least the company is), but it could be of Slavic origin. There's another PIE root for 'honey' *medhu. Sanskrit has madhu 'honey', English mead, Russian мёд (mjod) is 'honey'; Медведь (medved') is a 'bear', a 'honey-eater' literally, also Sanskrit madhuvad 'bear'.

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Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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And of course, mead.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan: [as Herger offers a mead horn] I can taste neither the fermentation of grape, nor of wheat.
[Herger laughs]
Ahmed Ibn Fahdlan: What? Why do you laugh?
Herger the Joyous: [laughing, and handing over the bottle] HONEY! It's made from honey!

From "The 13th Warrior"


RJA
 
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Ben Zimmer discovered that this list isn't from a "secret vault", and it's probably not a list of words rejected by the OED. Most of the words are from a Merriam-Webster's 2005 list of words that aren't in dictionaries.
 
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I missed this, goofy. Great article! I loved that link Zimmer had to sniglets, such as snackmosphere, which means the 95% air inside bags of potato chips; oatamatopoiea is the sound that the cereal "Captain Crunch" makes when you pour milk over it.
 
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