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Picture of Kalleh
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I was reading an article about Kurdistan, using the word peshmurga, meaning "a strong security force." As far as I know, we don't have a word like that, do we?
 
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As far as I know, peshmurga means' those who face death' in Kurdish.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Wkikpedia confirms this meaning, but the spelling is "peshmerga".
 
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Actually, the spelling in Kurdish is pêşmerge. I had spelled it peshmerga in my blog entry, but copied and pasted here Kalleh's spelling.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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pishmarg is the Persian form of this word (Kurdish is an Iranian language). It comprises of "pish" (pre-) and "marg" (death). It means pre-dier. One who dies before another one so that s/he would remain alive. For example, a bodyguard used to be pishmarg of his boss. Or a mother "who saves her child from a car accident and instead she herself dies" has become pishmarg of her child.


----------------------
Hamdeli az hamzabâni behtar ast
To be one in heart is better than to be one in tongue

- Rumi (Persian poet)
 
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look pesh means "to face" murge means death.
Peshmerga means the ones who face death. that's a translation. the book that says "a strong security force" was probably written by a journalist or politician that never left the base or did anything important in Iraq.
 
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Welcome, Shaun! See your PMs.
 
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Welcome, Shaun.

But I think you are being a bit harsh. The importation of foreign words into English very commonly involves an extension of the native meaning. There's no reason to conclude that those who use the imported words, or even initiate the importation, are REMFs.
 
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There's no reason to conclude that those who use the imported words, or even initiate the importation, are REMFs.

I suspect you're right. Now, if I happened to know what an REMF is, I could be 100% sureWink

And could a possible equivalent English word be "martyr"?


Richard English
 
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REMF was (and for all I know still is) military slang, highly pejorative. RE was "Rear Echelon".

Martyr? I don't think so. Maybe "forlorn hope"?
 
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There's an image of Peshmurga Kurdish Militia here.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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REMF

The MF in REMF is equivalent to that in JAMF, another acronym beginning jive-ass ... You may find its expansion here in this list of US Marine Corps vocabulary. It's a pejorative term for somebody who has a non-combatant role in some conflict.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Several years ago, one of my opponents in a postal chess tournament always ended his reply with the word "Maranathara." I asked him several times what it meant but he always ignored the question.

Anyone ever heard of the word and know its meaning? I hope he wasn't insulting my ability to play chess.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Could he have meant, perhaps, Maranatha?


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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Maranathara is a Sanskrit word. The closest English equivalent is probably red herring. It was used to describe an act that was done primarily to psychologically confuse an opponent.
 
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Originally posted by Valentine:
Maranathara is a Sanskrit word. The closest English equivalent is probably red herring. It was used to describe an act that was done primarily to psychologically confuse an opponent.


Where did you hear this? I haven't been able to find it. The closest I can find is maraṇa or māraṇa, "death".
 
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The closest I can find is maraṇa or māraṇa, "death".


Sounds like a typical chess player.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Proofreader,


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Came across this today.

This may be more accurate for the usage directed toward me.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Yikes. I forgot to follow up that my Sanskrit meaning was a pure figment of my imagination. I was hoping to pull Proofreader's chain a little.

Interesting answer. But what language? It is the Indonesia yahoo site.
 
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Different opinions on maranatha, a hapax legomenon in the New Testament (link).


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That's the same link as I posted on 9 September, z. Wink


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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That's the same link as I posted on 9 September

Is there an echo in here? Sorry about that, arnie.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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I assume that "Maranathra" and "Maranatha" are just variations on the same word?


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Well, we've found the word "Maranatha" but not "Maranathra".


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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How is "the lord is come" or "come, lord" related to chess?


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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I assume that "Maranathra" and "Maranatha" are just variations on the same word?


Not necessarily. But the original word you asked about was maranathara.
 
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I think I threw in an extra "a" at the end of my original post, after seeing what followed. It's been about fifteen years since the incident and that's why they have a statute of limitations.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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...I'm currently translating a movie which is in Kurdish into English...Actually, i do it thru Persian n the Directors help...this word "pishmarg" is used a lot n am lookin 4 a proper equivalent maintaining the original sense which is sth like an "escape goat" or "sticking-out neck"...they're actually soldiers, yet daring ones who fear not death...how would my wordcraft dudes opine on
" (life-staker) veteran"?...in a linguistic twist, they actually both take others' lives n stake their own...oceans o' tnx in advance...
 
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Originally posted by Hamed Abdi:
...I'm currently translating a movie which is in Kurdish into English...Actually, i do it thru Persian n the Directors help...this word "pishmarg" is used a lot n am lookin 4 a proper equivalent maintaining the original sense which is sth like an "escape goat" or "sticking-out neck"...they're actually soldiers, yet daring ones who fear not death...how would my wordcraft dudes opine on
" (life-staker) veteran"?...in a linguistic twist, they actually both take others' lives n stake their own...oceans o' tnx in advance...


I think "Suicide Battalion" is a good equivalent
 
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