Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Foreign Words    How would this translate?
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
How would this translate? Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted
We have talked about untranslatable in this forum, and I think the consensus is that everything is translatable, although it might not be with one word. It might be an explanation with a paragraph.

So...fast forward...I am at a conference on safety and quality today, and a speaker was talking about a highly reliable system in Sweden. He said they have "qulturums" or "quality houses." I just don't know what that is and couldn't translate it in a paragraph. Perhaps I could if I heard an entire lecture on it, or read an article on it. However, the speaker's mention of it did nothing for me.


Of course Google has something to say on everything. Here is what it has to say on "qulturums":
quote:
Qulturum is a center for development of improvement knowledge and renewal in healthcare. Qulturum is organizational a part of Jönköping County Council, an organization with the responsibility to provide health care, medical treatment and dental service for the residents of Jönköping county which is located in the south of Sweden.
 
Posts: 23277 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
Is this "qulturum" or "Qulturum"? It's capitalised on the site you linked to. It is really a brand name which you wouldn't translate. I would guess that most Swedish nationals, probably including some in healthcare, wouldn't necessarily know about it.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10925 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I think it is a brand name. It's "culture" spelled with a Q, which isn't a common letter in Swedish.
 
Posts: 2369Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by goofy:
It's "culture" spelled with a Q, which isn't a common letter in Swedish.
OK, where IS it common? Wink Seriously, though, the Swedes aren't above making up brand names, as witness Volvo and IKEA.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
Posts: 4430 | Location: In a cornfield in central IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
Q is not used in "native" Swedish words, so presumably it's not found in many words, probably many less words than in English. And "Qulturum" is so obviously a neologism created to refer to a very specific service, so I don't think it's even necessary to translate it.
 
Posts: 2369Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I thought it was generic, but maybe they use it like we use kleenex or xerox.
 
Posts: 23277 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I thought it was generic


Do you mean not generic? Either way, why is it necessary to translate it.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: goofy,
 
Posts: 2369Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
quote:
I thought it was generic, but maybe they use it like we use kleenex or xerox.

If it were a generic name it wouldn't be capitalised.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10925 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of wordmatic
posted Hide Post
quote:
If it were a generic name it wouldn't be capitalised.
That's just it; popsicle often is not. If you Google it, you'll find that most of the suggestions that pop up in the search bar are lower cased, though I admit that all newspaper and official web stories seem to have writers and editors who realize it is a registered trademark.

Wordmatic
 
Posts: 1390 | Location: Near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
So, I googled Qulturum and most of the top 30 or 40 results are capitalized and in Swedish. It looks to me like a proper name. Having not been at the conference that K. was at, I don't really have a feel for how the speaker was using it. S/He may have genericized it for the nonce. If I were translating the speech or some other text in which the word appeared, I'd leave it as is (no translation necessary) and add an explanatory footnote or introductory paragraph on what it means.

I agree with others that translations of proper names (either for humans or inanimate products) do not need to be translated, but if you had to translate them, it would be possible. Again, how else would an Swedish speakers be able to know what you were talking about if they'd never seen the word. Unless you're saying that special Swedish words like Qulturum are hardwired into Swedish brains and the rest of us non-Swedes are SOL.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5085 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
Well, I thought it was a generic term the way she was talking about it, and, while the audience was American, she seemed to speak like we should know what she meant. She didn't define it, nor did anyone ask about it. I guess I should have!

I've seen kleenex and xerox uncapitalized, when used generically, as well as popsicle, and others.

BTW, arnie I did not capitalize it originally. However, in looking for it in other articles, besides the one I linked to, it always seems to be capitalized. So, I guess you are right about it being a proper name.
 
Posts: 23277 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
I noticed that you didn't capitalise it, but the site you linked to did. That's what made me realise it was really a brand name.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10925 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Foreign Words    How would this translate?

Copyright © 2002-12