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Picture of bethree5
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I suppose you read the classics, back in the day, Kalleh? My big influences were Native Son (Wright), Black Like Me (Griffin), Invisible Man (Ellison), and of course To Kill a Mockingbird. Looks like I will want to read The Help.
 
Posts: 2049 | Location: As they say at 101.5FM: Not New York... Not Philadelphia... PROUD TO BE NEW JERSEY!Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Caterwauller
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I have a question...what do you do, CW, when a book isn't your "cuppa?" Do you finish it anyway? I struggle with that.


In the case of listening to the book on CD of American Gods, I listened to most of it anyway because we were listening to it as a family on a long road trip. Also, since my son loves the book so much I want to be able to talk with him about it, so it's worth it.

If it's just a book I picked up and there isn't some higher reason to read it, I'll just stop at a certain point. For instance, I got about 1/2 way through the first Twilight book and didn't really give a crap what happened to any of the characters - stopped listening to it!

I'm reading a book right now that I am very surprised to find that I like. It's The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. It tells the story of the woman whose cells became the much-used HeLa cells in research (cure for polio, etc), covers some of the history of medical ethics (she was never told she was donating cells to science, nor was her family), and race issues. I am more than interested in the book, and at times don't want to put it down. This from a person who normally doesn't read much non-fiction, let alone science!


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
 
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Sounds wonderful! I have finally got around to reading "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo." I have heard from others that it is hard to get into, and some have wondered what the hullabaloo is. I am enjoying it a great deal and am having a hard time putting it down.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Well, now I've finished the first and second Larsson books, and now I am on the third. These books are addictive, that's for sure.
 
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Picture of stella
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I haven’t read this trilogy, Kalleh, but I did see the first movie. I have to say that I was a bit shocked by the sexual violence in it – that surprised me, considering the wide-ranging appeal of the books.

I’ve read quite a lot lately though some of it seems to have fallen through little holes in my brain. Some that stand out

Barbara Kingsolver’s The Lacuna – beautiful, lyrical writing and I especially loved the first half, set in Mexico where the main character becomes intertwined in the lives of Trotsky, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. I’m going to try and read this one again.

Jeanette Walls’ autobiography The Glass Castle – a girl-overcomes-neglect story told with great skill and humour. I've had this one for years and only just got round to reading it - it's a REAL feel-good story (unlike eg Precious ) and a lovely piece of writing.

One more I remember, though I don’t know what appeal it might have to you northerners. The Tall Man by Chloe Hooper – a raw look at racial issues in Australia based on the true story of an aborigine who was arrested for drunken swearing and 40 minutes later was dead in a police cell with injuries akin to having being in a car wreck. But ... it’s not simple and no-one has ever been charged. Great book.

On that note, one more pops into my mind (not necessarily to recommend it). The Slap by Christos Tsiolkas – a look at contemporary suburban Australia, particularly through the eyes of immigrants; winner of the 2009 Commonwealth Prize, this is a very controversial book down under. A LOT of sex, drugs and swearing. Roll Eyes
 
Posts: 267 | Location: NZReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by stella:
I have to say that I was a bit shocked by the sexual violence in it – that surprised me, considering the wide-ranging appeal of the books.


Perhaps that's why it's so popular. Roll Eyes

Although I spent a lot of money on books when Kalleh, Shufitz, Tinman, and I went to Powell's Books, I've had my nose stuck in nothing but ones relating to attention deficit disorder, since I've recently been diagnosed as having it.

I seem to notice a stronger questioning by Australian writers of policy towards its aboriginal people than we've had towards those in North America. Our emphasis has been on our maltreatment of blacks rather than of indigenous people.


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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I'm reading A Guide to a Happy Mariage (in six parts) by Larry King.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
Posts: 5994 | Location: Rhode IslandReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is that the one with a forward by Zsa Zsa Gabor?


It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society. -J. Krishnamurti
 
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I think it's the foreword.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
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Picture of arnie
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Zsa Zsa Gabor has never been backwards in coming forward. A very up-front woman, she is. She's working on her own book on the subject: it will be in nine parts.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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She's working on her own book on the subject:

She'd better hurry. They just gave her the last rites.


Give a man a fish and he can eat for one day; give a man a fishing pole and he will find an excuse to never work again.
Nollidj is power.
 
Posts: 5994 | Location: Rhode IslandReply With QuoteReport This Post
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