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Picture of BobHale
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One of the podcasts on my list is A Way With Words which I listen to only occasionally because being American its focus on American word usage largely passes me by. However the 2nd March episode (a rebroadcast of an older one) Brollies and Bumbershoots includes some interesting bits about differences between US/UK English.

To give one example... how would you feel if I described your house as "homely"? If you wouldn't be happy about that then you should be because in the UK it means comfortable and welcoming.

Lots of other interesting things in the show... not just the usual you say trunk and we say boot kind of thing.

Worth a listen while you sit isolated from the world.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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My wife had begun watching a UK-based real estate show called "Escape to The Country." She's noted that to you a garden is our yard; a conservatory is our sun porch, and the first floor is upstairs. She's also learned that we could NEVER afford to buy a house er, cottage there!
 
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Originally posted by Geoff:
My wife had begun watching a UK-based real estate show called "Escape to The Country." She's noted that to you a garden is our yard; a conservatory is our sun porch, and the first floor is upstairs. She's also learned that we could NEVER afford to buy a house er, cottage there!


Indeed. To us if there is grass or trees or flowers or even vegetables, then it's a garden while a yard is made of concrete but then again you don't say concrete you save pavement but what we call pavement is your sidewalk. Confusing isn't it?


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
Posts: 9352 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Geoff:
My wife had begun watching a UK-based real estate show called "Escape to The Country."


You should try watching Homes Under The Hammer but - and this is vital - with the sound turned down. It becomes a sequence of surreal images where a man wanders from one room into another, can't remember what it was he wanted in there and wanders out again.

Full disclosure - I am not the first to make this observation - a comedian named Dave Gorman did it and was much funnier.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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Since we're too impecunious to afford cable we don't get many UK shows. We do not have an over-the-air channel that broadcasts Homes Under The Hammer."
 
Posts: 6051 | Location: Muncie, IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Geoff:
Since we're too impecunious to afford cable we don't get many UK shows. We do not have an over-the-air channel that broadcasts Homes Under The Hammer."


Plenty of old episodes on YouTube that will give you a flavour of the show.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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