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Picture of BobHale
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In a couple of hours I'll be off on holiday to Spain so for the next week or so I won't be posting.

See you all when I get back.


Bob

Non curo ! Si metrum no habet, non est poema.

Read all about my travels around the world here.
Read even more of my travel writing and poems on my weblog.
 
Posts: 8518 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Have a great time Bob!

Ros
 
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Picture of Richard English
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In fact, I too will be away. Next week Jersey, two weeks later Malta.

Richard English
 
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Have a great one, guys! Big Grin But, miss us a little, too!
 
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Enjoy your trips, one and all! I will be away next chat weekend. (May 30-June 1) Goin' to meet some friends! Big Grin
 
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I. too, will be away, starting tomorrow. I'm off to Ontario on business and may be away for weeks or even months. I'll be back on the board soon as I can! 'Bye fer now!

Dunc
 
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...and I've just come back from nearly a fortnight in France.

I hope everyone has as good a time as I did, but I'm not going to wish on you the weight loss I'm going to have to countenance as a result of all the food I troughed whilst there.

Stephen.
 
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Good to have you back, Bear! Big Grin

I have yet another U.K. versus U.S. question; do you all say "whilst" instead of "while"? I must admit, it sounds rather biblical to me, like "thee" or "thou". Guess I am just not used to it.
 
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Ah, those wacky Brits! Everyone knows that "Whilst" is a card game!
 
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...and here all along I thought it was what the Seven Dwarfs (Dwarves?) did as they went off to Work...
 
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Picture of BobHale
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quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
Good to have you back, Bear! Big Grin

I have yet another U.K. versus U.S. question; do you all say "whilst" instead of "while"? I must admit, it sounds rather biblical to me, like "thee" or "thou". Guess I am just not used to it.


"While" and "whilst" are both in use although "while" is much more common. To my ear "whilst" can sound a little pompous as if the speaker wants to appear cleverer than he really is.
Others may disagree though.

Non curo ! Si metrum no habet, non est poema.

Read all about my travels around the world here.
Read even more of my travel writing and poems on my weblog.
 
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As I just said elsewhere, we met some Americans in Italy last week, and it put me in mind of some of our "cultural differences" discussions here.

One thing I noticed was an inability to join in with (or maybe understand?) British self-deprecation. Our group was my family (four children) and my wife's sister's family (four children, three of them triplets); the Americans (again a large extended family group, but all adults) offered "congratulations on your lovely big families", which was nice of them. My wife's sister replied "Commiserations, more like" which to the British ear is clearly a jokey comment. The Americans looked slightly horrified, and were actually unable to find a reply -- they clearly were culturally unable to join in with non-positive language about children, maybe for fear of being unintentionally insulting?

(Talking of which, they said they loved the Italian weather, to which I said "But you have the sun in California, surely?"

"THEY come from California", one lady replied, "but WE come from Chicago, Illinois".

My instant reply was "Ah, so you have the wind", which caused some of my party to collapse giggling. Luckily, she didn't seem to notice. Poor choice of words on my part!)
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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"Commiserations, more like"
I can only say that I would think that remark quite funny. Perhaps it was a fear of offending another culture?

BTW, welcome back, Bob & Paul, too! Big Grin
 
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Originally posted by haberdasher:
...and here all along I thought it was what the Seven Dwarfs (Dwarves?) did as they went off to Work...


The dwarves and elves were introduced by Tolkien if I remember rightly. He decided he didn't like dwarfs and elfs as the plurals, so he used dwarves and elves instead. I think I agree with him!

Anyone know for sure?

Ros

PS - I'm on holiday in Devon from 6th to 23rd June, reverting to the original topic!
 
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We'll miss you, Ros. You Europeans seem to vacation more than we U.S.ers do!

I have always used "elves", but not "dwarves".
 
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I don't know about the Europeans but in England we go on holiday; we don't take vacations.

Richard English
 
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Alright--Europeans seem to go on holiday more often than Americans do, then. Richard, since few people here in the U.S. say "go on holiday", I might sound as if I were putting on airs were I to say it that way.

Now, on that subject, I did hear a statistic on the radio that supports my hypothesis. It said that Europeans (England is part of Europe, though I do get the message from this forum that the English don't always like to be called Europeans; if that's that case, I apologize in advance! Wink) take an average of 3-7 weeks vacation (holiday, whatever!) a year. To most Americans, that is a lot. Further, it said that because of the economy here, American vacations have decreased by 10%. Unfortunately, it didn't give an average number of weeks for American vacations, but I will venture a guess at 2-3 weeks per year.

[This message was edited by Kalleh on Sun Jun 15th, 2003 at 19:46.]
 
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We touched on this in last night's chat. When I used to work for the police I got twenty six days' annual leave plus 8 public holidays plus two concessionary days that doubled up two of those public holidays. If I worked my flexi time properly I could add another twelve or thirteen days a year.

That made a total possible of about fifty if I worked everything properly.

That's pretty high even for the UK but low by some European country standards. We are actually bottom of the table in Europe for the number of public holidays. Austria has 13 !

Non curo ! Si metrum no habet, non est poema.

Read all about my travels around the world here.
Read even more of my travel writing and poems on my weblog.
 
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Okay, today there was a big article in the Chicago Sun Times about the annual vacation (holiday for you Brits) time. The first number is the legal minimum, and the second is the average:

Austria 25 days/30 days
Denmark 25 days/30 days
France 25 days/30 days
Spain 25 days/30 days
Germany 24 days/30 days
Australia 20 days/25 days
Belgium 20 days/25-30 days
Greece 20 days/23 days
Italy 20 days/30 days
U.K. 20 days/25 days
China 15 days/15 days
Canada 10 days/n/a
Japan 10 days/17.5 days
U.S. 0 days/10 days

Then:

Annual hours worked per person:

South Korea 2,474
Bangladesh 2,301
Czech Republic 2,092
U.S. 1,979
Mexico 1,887
Japan 1,842
Canada 1,767
U.K. 1,720
Brazil 1,689
France 1,604
Ireland 1,520
Germany 1,480
Netherlands 1,365

No wonder we Americans are so crabby! Wink
 
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Picture of arnie
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I'm off to Northern Ireland for a couple of weeks. See you all in a fortnight!
 
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Well, this could be my last post for a while. From Wednesday I'll be off working away for five weeks and while I'll have enough access to a computer to check in from time to time I doubt that I'll have enough to do many replies.

If there is anything that you are truly desperate to get my opinion on then please Private Topic me and I'll try to answer.

I'll be thinking of you all and I know I'll suffer withdrawl but that's life.

Try to have fun while I'm gone.

Bob

Non curo ! Si metrum no habet, non est poema.

Read all about my travels around the world here.
Read even more of my travel writing and poems on my weblog.
 
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We will miss you, Bob! Frown You will be back in 5 weeks, correct?

Just to everyone know, for some reason the private topic notification system isn't working right now. I have let the administrators know, but until it is fixed, you might want to check in My Pop to see if you have received a private message.

Arnie, see you in a fortnight! Have fun and let me know what Galway is like. That's where my grandfather was born.
 
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Try to have fun while I'm gone.


That's a tough assignment, but with our limited resources and talents we'll do our best. Roll Eyes LOL and hahahahaha!!

* ** *** ***** ******** ***** *** ** *
Kalleh,

If you ever go across the sea to Ireland,
Then maybe at the closing of each day,
You could sit and watch the moon rise over Claddagh
And see the sun go down on Galway Bay.

Just to hear again the ripple of the trout stream,
The women in the meadow making hay.
Just to sit beside a campfire down by Claddagh,
And see the sun go down on Galway Bay.

The strangers came and tried to teach us their way,
They scorned us just for being what we are,
But, they might as well go chasing after moonbeams,
Or light a penny candle from a star.

Now, if there's going to be a life hereafter,
And faith, I'm sure there's going to be,
I would ask my God to let me make my Heaven,
In that dear land across the Irish sea.
 
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Wow! I haven't heard that song for ages. I'd forgotten about it. Dennis Day sang it on a Jack Benny album I had. Here's how I remember it (with a little help from Traditional Music Library (www.traditionalmusic.co.uk)

If you ever go across the sea to Ireland,
Then maybe at the closing of your day,
You will sit and watch the moon rise over Claddagh
And see the sun go down on Galway Bay.

Just to hear again the ripple of the trout stream,
The women in the meadows making hay;
And to sit beside a turf fire in the cabin
And watch the barefoot gossoons at their play.

For the breezes blowing o'er the sea to Ireland,
Are perfumed by the heather as they blow;
And the women in the uplands digging praties,
Speak a language that the strangers do not know.

For the strangers tried came and tried to teach us their way
They scorned us just for being what we are;
But they might as well go chasing after moonbeams
Or light a penny candle from a star.

And if there is going to be a life hereafter,
And faith I'm sure there's going to be,
I shall ask my God to let me make my heaven
In that dear land across the Irish Sea.

If you ever go across the sea to Ireland,
Then maybe at the closing of your day,
You will sit and watch the moon rise over Claddagh
And see the sun go down on Galway Bay.

I heard "turf fire" as "hearth fire", and "Claddagh" sounded something like "chaddow".

The AHD defines gossoon as "a boy; a servant". The Dublin Slang and Phrasebook defines it as a "foolhardy individual (usually male!)", and praties as "potatoes".

Tinman

[This message was edited by tinman on Mon Jul 7th, 2003 at 21:17.]
 
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Headed to Ohio for a few days. Richard, we are going to Vintage Motorcycle Days. My goal is to find and photograph a Rudge! Big Grin

My hubby's goal, on the other hand, is to find a vintage Indian to bring home. At least my goal won't cost us anything!
 
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We have no Rudge Club members in Ohio; the nearest are in Michigan and Missouri.

If you get in touch with the Club's Central US representative, Roger Chafen, he may be able to tell you whether there'll be any Rudges at the meeting you're attending.

Roger lives in St Joseph, Missouri and can be contacted at chafen@stjoelive.com

I had an Indian once, when I was very young! However, once I discovered Rudges there was no returning to lesser makes!

Richard English
 
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I'm back!
quote:
Arnie, see you in a fortnight! Have fun and let me know what Galway is like.
I'm afraid I haven't been to Galway. It's in the West of Ireland, in Connaught, whereas Northern Ireland is, erm, in the North, in Ulster. I had a good time and am sorry to be back (home that is; I'm not, of course, sorry to be back on the Wordcraft site). Big Grin
 
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Morgan says:
quote:

My goal is to find and photograph a Rudge! My hubby's goal, on the other hand, is to find a vintage Indian to bring home.


Sounds like a Rudge-rage alert is in order.

Richard replies:
quote:
I had an Indian once, when I was very young!


Braggart! Was her name Pocahantas?
 
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Welcome back, arnie! We missed you!
 
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No. The Indian I had was red, had two cylinders was noisy and quite small. Nothing like Pocahantas, I'm sure.

Incidentally, Rudge's most famous sporting motorcycle was their Ulster model, so called following their success in the 1928 Ulster Grand Prix - the world's fastest motocycle race at that time. By coincidence., Rudge's emblem was a wheel overlaid by a red hand - very similar to the red hand of Ulster, although there is actually no connection.

I have a 1930 Rudge Ulster, similar to the model that won the Isle of Man TT in that year. It will still do 100 mph, although I am not brave enough to try it these days!

Richard English
 
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Neither of us met our challenge. Roll Eyes

There were people at the meet from all over the US and Canada, motorcycles everywhere. Lots of fun for an enthusiast!
 
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Under the heading of "Don't send out the search parties," I will be on hiatus from this board for at least 6 weeks due to work and other considerations.


A Short Poem of Farewell

See you all
In the fall.
 
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C J Strolin
Goin' bowlin'?
 
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Well, you two remind me of Ogden! Wink

We'll miss you, CJ! I do look forward to Mondays. Please hurry back!
 
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Well CJ... I'd say that I will miss you as well, but since I'm hardly ever here now, that would not exactly be accurate. Actually, I'm not really here now, I'm in Chicago for a few days before heading up to the cabin in Minnesota. I'm typing on my cousin's computer and she has one of these ergomatic (what's the word?) keyboards that is split in the middle and tilted. It is so odd to type this way... but I've gone off on a tangent... What I really wanted to say was:
The board will not be the same without you CJ.
 
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I'm typing on my cousin's computer and she has one of these ergomatic (what's the word?) keyboards that is split in the middle and tilted. It is so odd to type this way...

The word you are looking for is ergonomic and once you get used to one, you will never want to type on a regular keyboard again! I started using mine after I had surgery for carpal tunnel. Without this keyboard, I am certain I would have trouble again.
 
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TrossL, if you are still here, give us a call! We're in the phone book and would love to hear from you!
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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Quoth Kalleh: I have always used "elves", but not "dwarves".

Does Shufitz know about your kinky side? Eek
 
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Yep! Razz Roll Eyes Red Face
 
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Okay, today there was a big article in the Chicago Sun Times about the annual vacation (holiday for you Brits) time. The first number is the legal minimum, and the second is the average:

Austria 25 days/30 days
Denmark 25 days/30 days
France 25 days/30 days
Spain 25 days/30 days
Germany 24 days/30 days
Australia 20 days/25 days
Belgium 20 days/25-30 days
Greece 20 days/23 days
Italy 20 days/30 days
U.K. 20 days/25 days
China 15 days/15 days
Canada 10 days/n/a
Japan 10 days/17.5 days
U.S. 0 days/10 days
This post could either go here or under one of our famous beer threads:
[From today's editorial in the Chicago Tribune]
"Wolfgang Clement, Germany's economy minister suggested abolishing some holidays to foster competitiveness in a staggering economy. In some parts of the country, paid vacation and holidays amount to 45 working days off a year--that's a full nine weeks. This combined with the short working weeks of 35 to 38 hours account for annual working hours that are almost one-quarter less [Sic] than the American average. Clement's suggestion went over like warm beer."

What this editor didn't realize is that warm beer (or at least not ice cold) is the norm in Europe. I have found that some of the wonderful English beers I am now drinking (e.g. Fuller's 1845) are much better a little warm.
 
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What this editor didn't realize is that warm beer (or at least not ice cold) is the norm in Europe. I have found that some of the wonderful English beers I am now drinking (e.g. Fuller's 1845) are much better a little warm.

Most of the European lager-style beers are, in fact best drunk cold. British-style bitters and ales are best at cellar temperature (about 50 degrees F) which is colder than room temperature, but warmer than ice cold.

Really warm beer (room temperature or above) is disgusting.
 
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Except mulled ale, of course Smile
 
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Well, yes, of course you're right, arnie. However, in the U.S. beer is literally served ice cold, in iced glasses. I do think our idea of warm beer is much different than yours.
 
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The colder the drink the less noticeable is its flavour. This is why so many people believe that bottled water tastes better than tap (faucet) water since the bottled variety is aways drunk cold and the tapwater much warmer.

Our local water company frequently run blind tasting where commercial bottled water is compared with a sample of their tapwater. All the samples are served at the same temperature from disguised containers and, without fail, few can distinguish between them. Invariably, those who do express a preference, tend to prefer the tapwater.

This taste phenomenon is used by the manufacturers of inferior drinks who ask that their concoctions be served "ice-cold". Thus they cannot be tasted and people accept them. The well-known phenomenon exhibited by American beers of their becoming quite undrinkable when warm is simply that their naturally disgusting taste beomes evident. Good beers, while being more refreshing when cool, will be drinkable even when quite warm.

Indeed, as has been mentioned, good beers can even be mulled - can you imagine mulled Budweiser! It would probably taste like something from a specimen bottle!

Richard English
 
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ROFL!

I must, however, confess to liking the other Budweiser.
 
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In fact, although Anheuser Busch have been trying for years to cover up the truth, the "other Budweiser" - brewed by the Budvar brewery in the Czech republic, is the real drink. It has nothing in common with the A-B muck apart from being a liquid.

A-B have several times tried to prevent Budvar from calling their beers Budweiser and have succeed in the USA where Budvar is sold under the Czechvar name.

In the UK A-B took Budvar to the highest court in the land and, to the eternal credit of british Justice the Law Lords threw the case out. In fact, their Lordships told A-B not to try again and to stop wasting people's time. So in UK pubs you can by the real Budweiser or the A-B chemical rubbish, both called Budweiser.

Apart from the difference in recipes, there is just one more area of deceit perpetrated by A-B. The "King of Beers" as American as apple pie, is brewed in that well known American town, Mortlake* - on the River Thames! The Czech drink is, of course, brewed in the Czech republic and imported.

*Mortlake is also where Watneys used to brew their vile "Red Barrel" and the name Mortlake means "dead water" - how very appropriate!

Richard English
 
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