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Picture of BobHale
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A friend forwarded this link. I rate it every bit as highly as I rate the ludicrous Gwynne's Grammar.

https://www.independent.co.uk/...-poets-a8523796.html


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Totally disagree. If he thinks Wikipedia "has become a substitute for serious research, a way of avoiding the discipline of academic discovery.", he is ridiculous. As one who writes, reads and reviews scientific papers, a Wikipedia citation means it's immediately rejected.
 
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It’s weird how he considers the English of his childhood to be fine, but all changes since then are horrible. I’m sure that’s just a coincidence.

I’m not sure he knows what the passive voice is.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Yes, many think what they were raised with is the best. The language is evolving and so many don't seem to grasp that. In the U.S. everyone is talking about Donald's comment about being a "nationalist." His people say that it has nothing to do with "white nationalism" and suggest we look up "nationalism" in the dictionary. Sure, their side will be right on that. However, I argue that society, at least in the U.S. has changed the meaning of "nationalist" in the last few years (hasn't hit the dictionary yet), to mean "white nationalist."
 
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Originally posted by Kalleh:
... I argue that society, at least in the U.S. has changed the meaning of "nationalist" in the last few years (hasn't hit the dictionary yet), to mean "white nationalist."
I'd not thought of it that way. I equate it with "patriot," but "America first" does come to mind.

How to you think of the phrase, "nationalist vs communist Chinese?" What does "nationalist" mean in that case?
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Interesting question. I suppose the same thing, really, but just not Communist. That is, there are others in China who are more globally minded and not just pushing the selfish needs of their country (such as stealing our technology).

I just read today, however, that maybe the correct term is American Nationalist. That I could buy. Nationalist, in my mind, however translates to white supremacist.
 
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Picture of bethree5
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Bob, I could not place a tart retort at the author's website, so here it is.

If you are truly concerned about this, look to your schools. The ability to express oneself cogently, with verve and originality, is directly related to the volume and quality of one's reading, and to the study and practice of writing. Primary and secondary education in the US and the UK have been highjacked by standardization, high-stakes testing, and commercialism. The corporations shaping and benefiting from these policies are indifferent to your concern; they are pushing product. Reading and writing are labor-intensive practices which cannot be measured by multiple-choice answers. Look to your local schools, and you will find curriculum narrowed to material whose mastery can be measured and assessed by computer-graded products.
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Well said, Bethree. I am not sure I00% agree, but you make a good point. I do think some minimal standards should be set so that continuous quality improvement can take place.

This may sound like a conservative, and heaven knows that is not I, but I have felt that the unions have minimized public education. While I favor unions, I do not think they work with the professions (nursing, education, etc.). Perhaps that is too political to talk about here.
 
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Homogeneity may be the issue. We are all - or should strive to be - individuals. If unions, or any other organization, seeks to homogenize us, it's not good. If people band together toward a common good, fine, but I recoil at the notion that what's good for one must be good for all. Raise the ceiling, don't lower the floor.
 
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Yes! I love the idea of raising the ceiling, and not the floor. You are right that what is good for some is not always good for others.
 
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