Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Buxom? Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted
Quote from episode one of a new series, Railway Walks, exploring some of the disused tracks around the UK.

"Once upon a time this route was filled with buxom busy express trains."


Buxom trains?
 
Posts: 8574 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
Well, one of the definitions is "[h]ealthily plump and ample of figure" (A-H). And, train aficionados are a strange bunch. And, while I'm free associating, I've often thought that cow catchers were a bit like bustles (in or out of a hedgerow).


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5087 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
I can't understand the phrase myself.

To change the subject a little Word of the Week on Nancy Friedman's Fritinancy blog is foamer, which is apparently the US nickname for train buffs, what we in the UK would call a trainspotter.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Richard English
posted Hide Post
In the UK we usually call them "anoraks".

On my last trip across the USA on AMTRAK I only met one anorak/foamer/trainspotter. He was frequently ensconced in the vestibule of our coach (US car) and spent his time checking the progress of our train as it wended its slow way from Seattle to Chicago.

Most of those we met simply preferred to travel by train (as was the case for me). I wouldn't think it was a necessity for anyone - unless they were unable for some reason to fly. The flight cost no more than the rail and would cover the distance in a few hours and not two days.


Richard English
 
Posts: 8037 | Location: Partridge Green, West Sussex, UKReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of jerry thomas
posted Hide Post
Richard, did the anorak/foamer/trainspotter explain why it was easier or more convenient to check the slow progress of the wending train while ensconced in the vestibule of the car rather than simply looking out the window?
 
Posts: 6708 | Location: Kehena Beach, Hawaii, U.S.A.Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I looked up "buxom" (the adjective) in the OED, fully expecting to find something about large breasts. Here are all the definitions. I must say, I was surprised:
quote:
I. Easily bowed or bent. 1. Morally. {dag}a. Obedient; pliant; compliant, tractable

Submissive, humble, meek.

Gracious, indulgent, favourable; obliging, amiable, courteous, affable, kindly

with inf.: Easily moved, prone, ready

Physically: Flexible, pliant. Yielding to pressure, unresisting

II. Blithe, jolly, well-favoured.
3. Blithe, gladsome, bright, lively, gay.

Full of health, vigour, and good temper; well-favoured, plump and comely, ‘jolly’, comfortable-looking (in person). (Chiefly of women.)
Perhaps they meant "lively" or "vigorous."
 
Posts: 24299 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Richard English
posted Hide Post
quote:
Richard, did the anorak/foamer/trainspotter explain why it was easier or more convenient to check the slow progress of the wending train while ensconced in the vestibule of the car rather than simply looking out the window?

He didn't - but I worked that out for myself. If you want to use the other windows you have a seat next to them - which stops the neck-craning that is so important to rail anoraks. Plus, whenever the train stopped, he was right by the door and ready to leap out and investigate the rail-nut chracteristics of the station.


Richard English
 
Posts: 8037 | Location: Partridge Green, West Sussex, UKReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I. Easily bowed or bent.
1. Morally. †a. Obedient; pliant; compliant, tractable


buxom might be from Old English būgan "to bend". This would make it cognate with bow and bagel.
 
Posts: 2438Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
Bagel??? Really? How interesting!
 
Posts: 24299 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
From the Old High German word for "ring".
 
Posts: 2438Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
quote:
Originally posted by goofy:
From the Old High German word for "ring".

Oh, yeah, the Ring of The Nubile Lungs!
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


Copyright © 2002-12