Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Questions & Answers about Words    A perfect example of a misplaced modifier
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
A perfect example of a misplaced modifier Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted
A question from a quiz show on TV last night.

"After moving to Sheffield which snooker player won the World Snooker Championship the most times ?"

It was of course the championship that moved to Sheffield rather than Stephen Hendry though you couldn't possibly guess that from the question.
 
Posts: 8630 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
Please pardon this ignorant question: What is the World Snooker Championship? Confused
 
Posts: 24357 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of jheem
posted Hide Post
K., snooker is a kind of billiards (or pool). Popular in the UK. The WSC is what you'd expect it to be. See the link for more info.
 
Posts: 1218 | Location: CaliforniaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
Ahhh...that must be where the slang term "being snookered" originated.
 
Posts: 24357 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
quote:
. that must be where the slang term "being snookered" originated.
That's right. If you put the cue ball in a position that means your opponent cannot play a legal shot, you get four points and have "snookered" him or her. It is often used metaphorically to mean that someone has been placed in an invidious position, with no obvious way out.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of jheem
posted Hide Post
It is often used metaphorically to mean that someone has been placed in an invidious position, with no obvious way out.

Interesting. Yanks talk about "being behind the eight ball" in a similar situation.
 
Posts: 1218 | Location: CaliforniaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I may be all wet, but isn't there a subtle difference between "being snookered" (or duped) and being "behind the eight ball" (or in an unfavorable situation). Yet, the way arnie describes being "snookered," it really seems to be imply an unfavorable position (like checkmate....which my husband has done to me far too often! Roll Eyes), which I guess can be extended to being duped.
 
Posts: 24357 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
Perhaps the expression "being snookered" has a subtly different meaning in the US. Over here we wouldn't use it to mean duped, only in the sense arnie used it - to be put in a difficult or impossible position.
 
Posts: 8630 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Chris J. Strolin
posted Hide Post
I agree with Kalleh - there's a huge difference.

In my mind, being "snookered" means being left with no way in which to proceed. Being "behind the eight ball" is being the target of a fairly easy or obvious attack. The first term reflects the unfavorable offensive position of the person in question, the second reflects the unfavorable defensive position.

(to me, anyway)
 
Posts: 681Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I recall that the rule is that your cue-ball has to hit the object ball first, or else. If it hits any other ball first, the shot is invalid and there is a penalty, called a "scratch." (One of several kinds of scratch, I might add.) Worse yet, the penalty for "scratching off the eight-ball" is losing the game outright then and there, no matter how far ahead you might have been to then.

"Behind the eight-ball" thus means having a very difficult (and risky) next shot, a highly undesirable position indeed. Offensively speaking.
 
Posts: 6004 | Location: Worcester, MA, USReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of jheem
posted Hide Post
I meant that the snooker term and the eight-ball term had similar meanings of being placed in a disavantageous or impossible situation. Snooker, the verb, also seems to have acquired another slightly different meaning of being tricked into that situation, but not so behind the eight ball saying.
 
Posts: 1218 | Location: CaliforniaReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Questions & Answers about Words    A perfect example of a misplaced modifier

Copyright © 2002-12