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Has anyone outside leftpond heard this expr--thanks all
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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Is "leftpond" the U.S.?
 
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Picture of arnie
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Not I.

Assuming "outside leftpond" means outside the US, and "expr" is expression. Oh, and assuming this was a question in the first place ...


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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Picture of shufitz
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I'm left-pondian, and I've never heard the expression. What does it mean, and who uses it?
 
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Forgive me; I'm so deeply into slang, neologisms, abbreviations, etc, that I automatically assume everybody will understand

Here's where I found it

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Out+the+cuts

It's almost edxclusively a rightpond expr and therefore I'm not surprised at the lack of response
 
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Picture of arnie
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quote:
It's almost edxclusively a rightpond expr
Translated (I think): It's almost exclusively a UK expression. Confused

As I said, I've never heard it. What makes you think it's from here? The entry in the Urban Dictionary gives no indication. Google searches for "out the cut" and "out the cuts" give no relevant hits.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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arnie: My technique:

1. Google the expr and note the no. of Ghits

2. Google it again but with

uk au nz nu zealand aussie brit british cockney

in the "without" box, again noting the number of hits.
 
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Yes, but almost none of the ghits have anything to do with the purported meaning from UD. The ghits don't all count. You need to look through them all or figure out how to filter the other ones. This is not a job I would volunteer for.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Well, right pond or left pond or middle pond...I've not heard the phrase either. It sounds, from that link to the Urban Dictionary, quite slangish.
 
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I have never heard it. It is certainly not Cockney Rhyming Slang; its construction does not follow the rules.

It could be slang from the modern youth culture, which I confess complete ignorance of.


Richard English
 
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by arnie:
Translated (I think): It's almost exclusively a UK expression.

The urban Dictionary definition: Generally meaning "out of nowhere". is clear, but its quotation certainly does not sound like upmarket UK language:
"When did Carson get here? I didn't even see him come in."
"Yeah, he just came out the cuts like, 'What's up guys, where's the party?' "
Tongue in cheek, Arnie?
 
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Picture of Graham Nice
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quote:
Originally posted by pearce:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by arnie:
Translated (I think): It's almost exclusively a UK expression.

The urban Dictionary definition: Generally meaning "out of nowhere". is clear, but its quotation certainly does not sound like upmarket UK language:
"When did Carson get here? I didn't even see him come in."
"Yeah, he just came out the cuts like, 'What's up guys, where's the party?' "
Tongue in cheek, Arnie?


And Carson isn't an English name: for a time all US golfers seemed to have surnames for first names (Curtis Strange, Payne Stewart, etc). It is certainly an American quote (from South Park?).
 
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zm: I wouldn't volunteer either, and that's why I depend on you guys for some insight
 
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Nope, it isn't from south park. Searching for left pond, I found another word forum explaining a "Dale's" use of leftpond/rightpond.

http://www.wordwizard.com/ch_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18622&whichpage=2

However, this seems to be different than the meaning I am interpreting, which is America.
 
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