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Picture of shufitz
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I found on the web this list of Ozzie slang terms. Doubless Maeve and others are more knowledgeable than I. Comments, challenges, supplements? What's commonly heard, and what's oddball?

arvo: afternoon
bikkie: biscuit
blower: telephone
blue: a fight or argument
bonzer: great
boobley: a big fight/argument
bugger-all: very little
go to buggery: go to hell!
carked it: died (e.g. the car carked it half way to the beach)
chockie: chocolate
chook: chicken
crack: a mental express extreme anger or rage
daks, underdaks: pants, underpants
deadshit: a person of low intelligence (an insult)
divvy van: police van, paddy wagon
drongo: a really dumb dude
up the duff: pregnant
dunny: toilet
fag: cigarette
fair dinkum, dinkum, dinky-dye: honest, truthful, honourable
fart-arse: screw off, waste time
crack a fat: get a boner
footy: a football, or a game of football
franger: condom
goes like a shower of shit: really fast or impressive
hooroo: goodbye, see you later
no wucker’s: a polite shortened form of the spoonerism ‘no wucking furries’
norks: breasts
piss: alcoholic beverage
pissed: drunk
root: synonymous with the word f*ck
sook: a ‘cry-baby’
wanker: one who masturbates... A good all purpose insult.
wowser: prude
yobbo: a rude or ingnorant person
 
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A number of these terms, although no doubt used in Oz, are also used in the UK, with identical meanings. They are not therefore exclusively Australian slang terms.
bikkie: not commonly used, but used mainly when the speaker wants to sound twee: "more tea and bikkies, Vicar?"
blower: an old-fashioned term. I have never personally heard it used but have seen it in books by authors such as PG Wodehouse.
bugger-all: common.
go to buggery: fairly common.
up the duff: one of many "up the..." expressions with the same meaning.
fag: very common.
footy: not often used, but I have heard it. More likely to be spelt "footie".
pissed: very common.
wanker: very common.
yobbo: quite common. More frequently, "yob".
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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"wanker: very common."
__________________________

I'm sure you'll all be pleased to know that in the state of Oregon there's a little settlement known as Wankers Corners. Don't aske me why, though! eek
 
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Pissed
So, Arnie, in England pissed means drunk and piss means an alcoholic beverage? Not the case in Chicago!
 
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quote:
in England pissed means drunk and piss means an alcoholic beverage? Not the case in Chicago!


No, no, pissed does indeed mean drunk (pissed off means angry). However, piss is only used to describe foul-tasting beer, such as that produced in the United States and Australia. big grin
 
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Excuse me, arnie, but as to matters of gustation, aren't you brits the ones who refer to a sausage as a wanker? roll eyes
["Please see said term in the top post of this thread," he said innocently]

"british cuisine" ... perhaps we should start a thread on oxymorons ?? big grin
 
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quote:
aren't you brits the ones who refer to a sausage as a wanker?


Er... Nope. roll eyes

Your list says:
quote:
wanker: one who masturbates... A good all purpose insult.

That's the use of wanker over here in the UK as well. The list makes no mention of sausages.

I think you may be confusing it with banger, which does mean a sausage. big grin
 
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quote:
banger, which does mean a sausage
Ah rest my case.

[Leaving you to decide whether the first two syllables are pronounced I rest or Arrest. wink]
 
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Sheesh you guys! roll eyes Now I'm hungry! razz

Anybody wanna meet me for a beer and a sausage...say 6:00 at the corner bar (or is that pub?)?????? wink
 
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Definitely it's a pub! One of the Great British institutions, and one that the Aussies were wise enough to keep! smile
 
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In his book The Mother Tongue, Bill Bryson has an amusing chapter on the differences between British and American English. He recounts a few gaffes he himself has made as a American living in England, like the one where he mentions giving his wife 'an affectionate pat on the fanny' at a formal sit-down dinner much to the horror of the British guests. He then realised that although the Brits do use the word 'fanny', it refers to another part of the female anatomy, not on the backside but on the front. wink
 
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The muse has inspired me to buy a copy of The Mother Tongue, which I'd read only from the library. Arnie, from that source and on the subject of "british cuisine", what are
  • toad-in-the-hole,
  • spotted dick, and
  • faggots in gravy?
They sound [adjective omitted], and gave me a chance to try the "list" function. smile
 
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toad-in-the-hole

Sausages cooked in batter. Delicious. One of my favourites.
Recipe

spotted dick

A steamed suet pudding. The "spots" are sultanas or raisins.
Recipe

faggots in gravy

Faggots are meatballs, basically. Real faggots are made of pig's liver, but other meats are used as well. Gravy is usually onion gravy.
Recipe

This English-American Recipe Translator may be useful if you want to try out the recipes. smile
 
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OH, dear God! What is your cholesterol level, arnie? Every one of those recipes is dripping with lard or suet! razz

How about another item of "British Cuisine"?

A chip buttie? confused
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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Hey, Morgan, you remember that joke about heaven and hell- the one that says that in heaven, the brits are the cops, and in hell they are the cooks? smile

Asa, from the country that's the noisy, know-it-all, pushy neighbour. roll eyes
 
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Of course! Cholesterol is the secret ingredient in British cooking!

A chip buttie is a chip sandwich. What you would call french fries (cooked in lard, preferably) smile placed between two slices of bread. The chips are often slathered in HP brown sauce or perhaps tomato ketchup. razz
 
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My brother had an argument with his Australian girlfriend one day because she asked him to make her a 'salad sandwich' and he made her a sandwich with tomato, lettuce and green pepper. It was not what she was expecting. What do Ozzies mean by a 'salad sandwich'?
 
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