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To wand, or not to wand, that is the question.... Login/Join
 
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Picture of Kalleh
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A columnist was writing about anti-terrorism and mentioned that now "to wand" is a common, everyday verb. That got me to thinking...have other words like that developed since 9/11?
 
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What does it mean? Confused


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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Arnie I think your question about the meaning of "to wand" indicates that you haven't travelled by air lately.

Airline passengers about to board airplanes must pass through Security Checkpoints where the Security Guards are equipped with metal-detecting wands that they wave around the passengers' bodies. When metal is detected, an audible alarm says, "Beep!"

Twenty years ago I fell off a bicycle and shattered my left acetabulum, or hip socket. Steel bolts were installed in the repair surgery. Those bolts set off the alarm whenever I'm wanded, so I explain about the bolts and offer to show the scar. My offer is usually declined.

Next question?
 
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I've travelled by air many times in the past few years and have been checked in the way you describe. But never have I heard it referred to as "wanding".

I suspect it's a US term.


Richard English
 
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I've heard it used by some security people at a US airport. It makes sense that it would develop. Easier to say: "I have to wand this person" than "I have to run a metal-detecting wand over this person's body." I suspect that English will survive the injection of a new denominal verb.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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I must admit this is the first time I ever saw "wand" used as a verb.

Whether it's a U.S. term or not is anybody's guess. I predict the procedure will continue but that use of the word will not.
 
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It may not be long-lived, but then so few things are, but it certainly serves a current purpose for the people who use it.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
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Hmmm...I thought it was a common use of the word. Perhaps it is just used more at O'Hare. I was "wanded" the other day in Salt Lake City, though. It was irritating because I specifically asked if I had to take my shoes off, and he said no. Then, when I beeped, he said, "You should have taken your shoes off!" Roll Eyes

Are there other words like this that have arisen since 9/11 and our increased focus on anti-terrorism?
 
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quote:
Originally posted by jerry thomas:
I must admit this is the first time I ever saw "wand" used as a verb.

Whether it's a U.S. term or not is anybody's guess. I predict the procedure will continue but that use of the word will not.


I too have never heard wand used as a verb, Thank goodness.
 
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On a similar note, Michael Quinion's newsletter reports:
The Gatwick Airport site, Ben Ostrowsky notes, interprets this [the recent restriction on hand baggage] disturbingly: “Hand baggage restrictions are in place; Passengers will be handsearched; Footwear and all items (including pushchairs and walking aids) must be x-ray screened; Liquids will be removed from the passenger.” Is that like taking the piss?


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
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The Brits say:
  • arnie: "What does it mean? Confused"
  • Richard: "But never have I heard it ... I suspect it's a US term.
  • pearce: "I too have never heard wand used as a verb"

    But The Guardian says today, "Domodedovo [airport, in Moscow] has since evolved a policy whereby if Muslim women will not be wanded or hand searched, they have to stand in an x-ray machine." The Guardian is quoting an editor of Flight International Magazine, which appears to be UK-based. (Note that its homepage is at http://www.qssa.co.uk, etc.)

    This message has been edited. Last edited by: shufitz,
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    Posts: 2615 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
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    Picture of shufitz
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    The word may predate 9/11. Here is a cite from very shortly after that date.
      I did see some people getting wanded, and I was wanded too, ...
      Peggy Noonan, Wall Street Journal, Nov. 30, 2001
     
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    Picture of Kalleh
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    Interesting, Shu.

    Maybe there aren't any words that have been coined since 9/11 then. However, "Ready to roll!" sure was popularized from 9/11.
     
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    The Guardian is quoting this David Learmount, who is the Flight International magazine operations and safety editor. I suspect the word is quite likely used as jargon by the security services, but not used by people in general over here.


    Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
     
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    Picture of Richard English
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    quote:
    However, "Ready to roll!" sure was popularized from 9/11.

    If it means the same in the USA as it does here, then I can tell you that it has been in use for longer than that.


    Richard English
     
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    I believe the proper quotation was "Let's roll." Yes, it has been around a long time.
     
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    Practically any word can be used as practically any part of speech

    CRASH: n: when there is a security crash vb: crash the White House [fr West Wing] adj: in the crash mode

    But I need an example where it's used as an adverb
     
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    Picture of Kalleh
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    Well, of course "Let's roll" (or any derivations thereof) has been around for awhile. My point, however, was that 9/11 surely popularized it.
     
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    quote:
    Originally posted by Kalleh:
    Well, of course "Let's roll" (or any derivations thereof) has been around for awhile. My point, however, was that 9/11 surely popularized it.


    I would say that it was already a very popular expression, and 9/11 didn't make it any more popular than it already was.
     
    Posts: 886 | Location: IllinoisReply With QuoteReport This Post
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    quote:
    Originally posted by dalehileman:
    But I need an example where it's used as an adverb


    The crashless race team won its fifth title.

    That isn't "crash" exactly, but I don't see it being an adverb without a suffix.
     
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    Picture of Kalleh
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    quote:
    I would say that it was already a very popular expression, and 9/11 didn't make it any more popular than it already was.

    Not around here, but there always are regional variations.
     
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    Kalleh, we aren't from too far apart. It is probably a generational issue. : )
     
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    Picture of Kalleh
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    Yeah...I thought of that after I posted that. Oh well!
     
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