Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Questions & Answers about Words    Counterparts of 'anglophile,' 'francophobe', etc.
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Counterparts of 'anglophile,' 'francophobe', etc. Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted
We have the words anglophile and anglophobe, and francophile and francophobe, etc. for those who adore or detest the cultures of England, France, etc.

Given the pervasive influence of U.S. culture, one would think it would be valuable to have parallel terms for the U.S. Do such terms exist?
 
Posts: 2615 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
I don't know by I find it interesting from a psychological viewpoint that you chose to name the thread using anglophile but francophobe.

Over to you Doctor Freud.
 
Posts: 8311 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of jheem
posted Hide Post
I suggest yankophile and yankophobe.
 
Posts: 1218 | Location: CaliforniaReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
quote:
U.S. culture
An oxymoron, surely? Big Grin


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by BobHale:
I find it interesting from a psychological viewpoint that you chose to name the thread using anglophile but francophobe. Over to you Doctor Freud.
Now Bob! With two prefixs and two suffixes there are four combinations, which seemed rather too many to fit into a title-line. Now of course I could have fit all the prefixes and suffixes into two words by saying anglophobe and francophile, but could anglic insecurity have borne the insult? Wink

To arnie: pffffffffffffffftttttttt!!! A raspberry tart to you, mate! Big Grin

Non Angli, sed Angeli.
 
Posts: 2615 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Richard English
posted Hide Post
quote:
Non Angli, sed Angeli.

They did have a word for it, those Romans.


Richard English
 
Posts: 8037 | Location: Partridge Green, West Sussex, UKReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I have been workshopping a limerick of Richard's on OEDILF on Anglophiliac. Interestingly, one of the astute workshoppers picked this up about the difference between Anglophiliac and Anglophilia:

"Anglophiliac does not mean sheer admiration. Anglophilia does. But Anglophiliacs share (or have) admiration."
 
Posts: 24030 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
quote:
Originally posted by Richard English:
quote:
Non Angli, sed Angeli.

They did have a word for it, those Romans.


Said, if I remember correctly, because of their blonde hair and blue eyes, not because of their comportment.

And arnie, in re US culture: 'tis no oxymoron - we have many fungi here. Wink
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Caterwauller
posted Hide Post
Well . . . I would say we have lots of culture . . . whether or not it's actually high culture . . .

I mean, Jeff Foxworthy, one of our comedians, has pointed out quite a few cultural idiosyncracies of "Red-necks" that make the group quite identifiable.


*******
"Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
~Dalai Lama
 
Posts: 5149 | Location: Columbus, OhioReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
It's a rhetorical device, CW. When one disagrees with somebody's something, it's best to just deny it's anything at all. Which reminds me: what is the difference between LA and yoghurt? ...


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5086 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
One of them has a culture - AND one tastes better, but I'm not sure which.
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
Egg-zackly, Asa.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5086 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
I suggest yankophile and yankophobe.


People in Texas and other Southern locations would disagree with this. While George Bush might be a Yankee, southerners would feel mortally insulted to be called Yankees. Of course, I'm a "yankee" and I'm from Chicago, so go figure, it evidently has something to do with the civil war, and nothing to do with Dutch pirates.
 
Posts: 886 | Location: IllinoisReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
It has to do with the Mason Dixon line.
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
quote:
People in Texas and other Southern locations would disagree with this.

Well, last I heard, Tejas and other states southern lost the Civil War and ain't really part of Anerica anywho. Wink And, it was a joke, son. I say a joke.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5086 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 

Wordcraft Home Page    Wordcraft Community Home Page    Forums  Hop To Forum Categories  Questions & Answers about Words    Counterparts of 'anglophile,' 'francophobe', etc.

Copyright © 2002-12