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In today's Guardian, on page 9 of the broadsheet bit, there is a small article about the capercaillie. Apparently....
'Capercaillie numbers have fallen below 1,000 and there are fears of it becoming extinct again.'

Eek

Tadpole
 
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Well, that's a neat trick!
 
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I had never heard of them. They are wood grouses, evidently native to northern Europe? Why is that so strange?
 
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Not that - the "extinct again"!
 
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Ohhhhhhhh! Red Face
 
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Misplaced modifiers are always good for a laugh!

Richard English
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
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Misplaced modifiers are always good for a laugh
-----------------------------------------------

I didn't see it right off either, Kalleh. Confused It therefore became a misplaced mortifier!
 
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... here's information about the Capercaillie

~ ~~ ~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~ ~~ ~

What mildly disturbs me in the Guardian article is "... and there are fears of it becoming extinct again.'

I believe it should say, " ... there are again fears of its becoming extinct."

.... because a noun or pronoun modifying a gerund is possessive. No?
 
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We can't have 'it' becoming extinct. It is far too useful a word.

Tadpole
 
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I have just been reminded about an article that appeared in a gardening column in which the author was suggesting that we should let our gardens grow wild. They should be
'allowed to revert to virgin woodlands'

Roll Eyes

Tadpole
 
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Or Oscar Levant on Doris Day?

"I knew her before she was a virgin."
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Ros:
Not that - the "extinct again"!

This is not as bad as it looks. In his post on June 30, Jerry gives a link to Capercaillie. It says the capercaillie was exterminated in Scotland in 1785 and reintroduced in the 19th century. So the animal was locally extinct in Scotland. In botany they often use the term extirpated for this.

Tinman
 
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"revert to virgin woodlands"

It is not unknown for a female to attempt to distance herself from a former lower life-style by feigning what may be called retroactive virginity.
 
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quote:
they often use the term extirpated for this.
Interesting, Tinman. I never would have guessed that from the definitions in onelook.
 
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Not-so-famous quotation that may or may not be relevant here:

"The same women who fervently claimed to be virgins in high school now just as earnestly profess to be sexualiy insatiable. They weren't then and they aren't now."


I doubt that this is word-for-word perfect and I haven't a clue as to its originator.
 
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