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Is sue now only understood as an adversarial term? Since the US seems only to use it to mean a legal weapon against some person or entity, it's not heard as request or entreaty. Is this the case in all English-speaking places?
 
Posts: 5610 | Location: Muncie, IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of BobHale
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Outside of historical dramas I think I've only heard it used in the sense of suing someone in court.


"No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money." Samuel Johnson.
 
Posts: 8752 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
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So, a traitorous eytmology! From the Latin, "sequi," we get "suitor" and suit; one a follower, the other an opponent. But then if the suitor is of the romantic variety, it might devolve into the latter term eventually. Wink
 
Posts: 5610 | Location: Muncie, IndianaReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Kalleh
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Interesting thought, Geoff. But I do agree with Bob that "sue" itself seems to only refer to court cases. Of course, there is always the lady's name, Sue!
 
Posts: 24483 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
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