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Picture of Kalleh
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In the recent novel I read, which took place in Baltimore, they were talking about mukluks. I do remember my cousins from Chicago (I was from Wisconsin) talking about mukluks, but that word wasn't used around me. Is it a regional word?

What are other words from your past?
 
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Frum Siberian: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...erian_Yupik_language Also used by Aleuts in Alaska. Boots made from seal or sometimes reindeer skin, usually fur lined.
My father brought the word home after spending time in Point Barrow, Alaska with the US Navy doing research on permafrost. That was about sixty years ago. So, no longer regional, having spread widely.

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Geoff, do you hear the word in the midwest? I sure don't hear it - only years ago from my cousins.
 
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I bet if you do an internet search you'll find commercial knockoffs sold at myriad yuppie boutiques. Also anorak, which is more common in the UK than here, but has diffused/generalized.
 
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What about "supper?" Do they say "supper" in Indiana? That is said all through north, but not in the midwest.
 
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Some say it, but it seems to be only older folks. Sue uses it.
 
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You mean "supper" as opposed to "dinner"?
Since '70's, I've only heard "dinner" used in NE in conjunction w/holidays. I associate the demise of "dinner" w/the death of the 1-career nuclear family - before Dad was constantly traveling/ working OT, & arrived home at 5 pm in time to relax then enjoy "dinner" at 6pm. Ah those were the days.
 
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Well, I wouldn't have chosen any of those. There wasn't a selection for dinner being the evening meal - not more formal. I grew up with supper, but when I moved to San Francisco and then Chicago, it became dinner.
 
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When I was a kid in Kansas, we had breakfast in the morning, dinner around noon, and supper in the evening. When we moved to Washington, it was breakfast, lunch, and dinner. From what I've read it appears that dinner is the main meal of the day, whether at midday or evening, while lunch is a light midday meal and supper is a light evening meal.
 
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So how come the christian types still talk about Jesus' "Last Supper?" Was he from Kansas, blue-eyed, and spoke 17th Century English? Confused
 
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Good point, Geoff!

All I know is that when I was a kid, supper was always where we had our big meal, and dinner was like our current lunches. That was in Wisconsin.

So - I heard another today. I am in North Carolina on vacation (the reason for my low numbers of posts), and there was an automobile accident causing a huge traffic jam. They called it a "wreck." Of course I knew what they were talking about, but I'd never call it that. What about you?
 
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"Wreck" is common in my opinion.
 
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Of course I knew what it meant, but not common where I come from.
 
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Very nice. I love Longfellow.
 
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