Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
team?mates Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted

Question:
    Quote: He called Mr. Beckham and his team mates "nancy boys."
What struck me about this is that I would have written teammates. The author of the quoted passage is British (Quentin Letts), and I'm from the US.

Is this another transpondial difference? Which way do you spell it?

Choices:
I write "team mates" and I'm a Brit.
I write "teammates" and I'm a USn.
I write "teammates" and I'm a Brit.
I write "team mates" and I'm a USn.

 
 
Posts: 2618 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
There is also the option "team-mates". Wink

I've voted for "team mates", but I suspect I might use "team-mates". I think it's more a matter of individual style. This is similar to the usual progression as in "store front" > "store-front" > "storefront".


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
As ever, what he said!
 
Posts: 8451 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
I write none of the above, as I've never been chosen for a team, but hyphenation makes sense to me. It's like "coworker" instead of "co-worker." In some parts of this country you'd get arrested for orking cows.

Asa the clumsy
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
Having introduced the hyphen into this discussion I'll proceed to take the thread further off-topic.

My newspaper contained the word "pre-occupied", which I can only assume is an error. To me, it would mean "occupied before", not "lost in thought". I see, however, that "occupied before" is a secondary meaning of "preoccupied". I would use "pre-occupied" in a sentence like When we moved into our new home we discovered it had been pre-occupied by a family of rats.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
I think of "pre-occupied" when I head for the toilets on airliners, which always have people in them. Or is that pee-occupied?
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
Another instance is re-mark, which we use at work quite often when a school queries the exam results of pupils and asks for their papers to be marked again. I have seen it spelt remark, which is not only incorrect, in my view, but also potentially confusing.


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
I suspect I need some help in searching Google. A search for "teammate" gave around 13,900,000 Ghits; one for "team-mate" about 2,790,000; whereas "team mate" reported 2,810,000. However, a cursory look through the results for team mate gave several hits for team-mate. Is there any way of filtering out the hyphen? Since the "-" character is used as a search command itself, you can't very well exclude it!


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
I suspect that Google treats team mates and team-mates as identical (the difference in ghits being due to approximation). You see that if you add other terms to reduce the sheer number of ghits. A search for "team-mate" androgynous yields identical numbers of ghits with and without the hyphen.
 
Posts: 2618 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
Google seems to strip out punctuation from searches.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5087 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of arnie
posted Hide Post
Yeah, that's what I thought. Frown


Build a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life.
 
Posts: 10940 | Location: LondonReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
I tried to escape the punctuation by using a back-slash (\), but that didn't seem to work.

For example google "Mr\. Smith".


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5087 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
I googled up google punctuation and found that Google recognizes non-letter characters in some special combinations (C++; $10), and it will recognize the apostrophe, but that's it. There is no general way to force Google to recognize non-letter characters.

Hyphens are a special case. A search with a hyphen, such as team-work, will return matches for team-work, team work and teamwork.
 
Posts: 2618 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
I am much more intrigued by "nancy boys." What on earth are they?
 
Posts: 24164 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
Oh, silly me! I thought Hyphen was an Israeli seaport full of seven-headed sea monsters. Or do I have it confused with Haiphong? Confused
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted Hide Post
No, you have Haiphong confused with diphthong.
 
Posts: 2618 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
Oh, Shu, a dipthong is the little piece of ribbon girls wear when they go swimming. Oy, don't you know ANYthing!?!?
 
Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of BobHale
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Kalleh:
I am much more intrigued by "nancy boys." What on earth are they?


It's a slightly dated insult calling someone effeminate or homosexual. You still see or hear it occasionally.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: BobHale,
 
Posts: 8451 | Location: EnglandReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
I'm a bit younger, so I'll say is very dated. It sounds to me like it would be used in the 50s. I have heard it a bunch of times, but I can't put my finger on any of the contexts.
 
Posts: 886 | Location: IllinoisReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Kalleh
posted Hide Post
First of all, I can't believe you've heard it. I haven't, and I am "a bit" older than you are. Wink Though I do suspect that men talk about this subject more than women do.
 
Posts: 24164 | Location: Chicago, USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of zmježd
posted Hide Post
Well, I've heard nancy boy used by both straight and gay men in speech, but as an archaism. I've heard it movies and read it in literature. I don't think it's rare, just a bit old fashioned.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
 
Posts: 5087 | Location: R'lyehReply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


Copyright © 2002-12