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Are we "lexiphiles"? Login/Join
 
Member
Picture of shufitz
posted

Question:
Our museamuse proposes,
quote:
How about 'lexiphile'? It uses the word 'lexis' which is a direct reference to the word 'word' instead of language as a whole. I don't know if this is a word, but in my book it should be!
Though I couldn't find it in any on-line dictionary, I agree with muse: the coinage is perfect. Agreed that we are now to be called lexiphiles?

Choices:
aye
nay
you can't get unanimity about anything
call me anything you like, but don't call me late to dinner

 
 
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Picture of arnie
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The word logophile does appear in the dictionary, and means a lover of words. Why coin a new word when we already have a perfectly serviceable alternative?
 
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<Asa Lovejoy>
posted
Why
coin a new word when we already have a perfectly serviceable alternative?
_________________________________

All too often I her "logos" as a religious term, as in the "Word of God." Being unreligious myself, I like the more neutral coinage that does not have any "baggage" associated with it. Yes, this is MY "baggage," but it feels right.
smile
 
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Picture of shufitz
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My incompleteness, arnie. I should have given the link to the rationale suggesting that lexiphile and linguaphile would have slightly different meanings. Sorry.
 
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I would be careful using the term lexiphile since it also has other connotations.

But lexicomaniac and lexiphane are good alternatives.
 
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And--what are those other connotations, autotheist? If we coin the word, can't we define it any way we want to?
In trying to find lexiphile even cited (and I couldn't), I found lexiphane (as "lexiphanicism") in the Grandiloquent Dictionary; it is a useful word, but it doesn't really describe a word-lover (the original question), does it? Its definition: Lexiphanicism- Showing off by using words.

[This message was edited by Kalleh on Tue Sep 3rd, 2002 at 9:28.]
 
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I favor "logophile" over "lexiphile". Better yet, "word lover". I see no need to use an arcane term when an easily-recognizable one will do. Perhaps "logophile" will become a common term some day, but I doubt it. I'm speaking from a USA perspective; I have no idea how common it is in Britain.

When most people here think of "logo", they think of a company symbol (logogram or logotype - OED), so they would associate "logophile" with a lover of logos.

I do like "linguaphile", though. It has a nice sound, and "lingua-" looks enough like language that I think most people could figure it out.

Tinman

[This message was edited by tinman on Tue Sep 3rd, 2002 at 22:08.]
 
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Picture of shufitz
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Kalleh notes "Lexiphanicism - Showing off by using words" -- of which I found a humorous example while searching this topic. From the "about the author" page of the excellent Phrontistery site:
quote:
Whether you prefer the term logolept, verbivore, logophile, epeolater, or logodaedalus, to name only a few, I count myself among that odd crowd who takes great joy in the mere mention of a new or interesting word
Definitions of the above, found on that site or elsewhere:
>>logolept - a word maniac
>>epeolatry - worship of words
>>logodaedalus - artificer in words (logodaedalus, logodaedaly = vebbal legerdemain)

[This message was edited by shufitz on Wed Sep 4th, 2002 at 14:54.]
 
Posts: 2618 | Location: Chicago, IL USAReply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Kalleh
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Tinman,
I think I agree with you that "word lover" is best of all (much like the scare crow is best of all to Dorothy! big grin). Why use a fancy word when you don't have to? Just today, I was in a meeting when our executive director said that we will, "utilize the system...." I have always hated the word "utilize". While "utilize" is not exactly highfalutin, "use" is simpler. Or maybe logophiles don't want to use simple words! razz
 
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